MM_XSLTransform error.
http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/index.php/feed/ is not a valid XML document.
Non-static method DOMDocument::loadXML() should not be called statically, assuming $this from incompatible context in file http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/index.php/feed/.
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?><rss version="2.0"
	xmlns:content="http://purl.org/rss/1.0/modules/content/"
	xmlns:wfw="http://wellformedweb.org/CommentAPI/"
	xmlns:dc="http://purl.org/dc/elements/1.1/"
	xmlns:atom="http://www.w3.org/2005/Atom"
	xmlns:sy="http://purl.org/rss/1.0/modules/syndication/"
	xmlns:slash="http://purl.org/rss/1.0/modules/slash/"
	>

<channel>
	<title>MN Department of Natural Resources &#8212; News Releases</title>
	<atom:link href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/feed/" rel="self" type="application/rss+xml" />
	<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us</link>
	<description>MN Department of Natural Resources -- News Releases</description>
	<lastBuildDate>Mon, 19 Nov 2018 18:16:43 +0000</lastBuildDate>
	<language>en-US</language>
	<sy:updatePeriod>hourly</sy:updatePeriod>
	<sy:updateFrequency>1</sy:updateFrequency>
	<generator>https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.6</generator>
	<item>
		<title>Upper Red Lake walleye regulations continue for winter season</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/11/19/upper-red-lake-walleye-regulations-continue-for-winter-season/</link>
		<pubDate>Mon, 19 Nov 2018 18:16:43 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Fish and Wildlife]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fisheries]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fishing]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=21483</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[Anglers fishing during the winter season on Upper Red Lake will continue to have a four walleye bag limit, with only one walleye allowed longer than 17 inches.  The same regulation has been in place since the May 2017 fishing &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/11/19/upper-red-lake-walleye-regulations-continue-for-winter-season/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Anglers fishing during the winter season on Upper Red Lake will continue to have a four walleye bag limit, with only one walleye allowed longer than 17 inches. <span id="more-21483"></span></p>
<p>The same regulation has been in place since the May 2017 fishing opener. From December 2017 through November 2018, anglers harvested approximately 235,000 pounds – a record high for annual harvest since walleye fishing resumed on the lake in 2006.</p>
<p>Red Lake’s walleye harvest is managed under a joint harvest plan. The Red Lakes Fisheries Technical Committee revised the plan in 2015. The revised harvest plan recommends an aggressive approach when walleye spawning stock is in surplus, as it currently is. An Upper Red Lake Citizen Advisory Committee reviews walleye harvest totals and regulation options and provides recommendations for regulations for the state waters of Upper Red Lake.</p>
<p>Eventually there may be a need to make adjustments to size or bag limits if spawning stock declines and needs more protection, but for now the opportunity to harvest some fish over 17 inches is popular with anglers, and it meets harvest plan objectives by spreading harvest over a wide range of sizes and removing some of the surplus spawning stock.</p>
<p>More information on Red Lake fishing regulations is available at <u><a href="http://links.govdelivery.com:80/track?type=click&amp;enid=ZWFzPTEmbWFpbGluZ2lkPTIwMTgxMTE5Ljk3ODQwNjIxJm1lc3NhZ2VpZD1NREItUFJELUJVTC0yMDE4MTExOS45Nzg0MDYyMSZkYXRhYmFzZWlkPTEwMDEmc2VyaWFsPTE3NTY1NzExJmVtYWlsaWQ9anVsaWUuZm9yc3RlckBzdGF0ZS5tbi51cyZ1c2VyaWQ9anVsaWUuZm9yc3RlckBzdGF0ZS5tbi51cyZmbD0mZXh0cmE9TXVsdGl2YXJpYXRlSWQ9JiYm&amp;&amp;&amp;103&amp;&amp;&amp;http://www.mndnr.gov/regulations/fishing?utm_content=&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_name=&amp;utm_source=govdelivery&amp;utm_term=">mndnr.gov/regulations/fishing</a></u>.<strong>    </strong></p>
]]></content:encoded>
			</item>
		<item>
		<title>Pheasant hunting a great excuse to get outdoors as temperatures drop</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/11/19/pheasant-hunting-a-great-excuse-to-get-outdoors-as-temperatures-drop/</link>
		<pubDate>Mon, 19 Nov 2018 18:08:59 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fish and Wildlife]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Pheasant]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Wildlife]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=21479</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[Pheasant hunters should have plenty of harvest opportunities during the late season hunt. “The hunting forecast looks really good for the latter part of the pheasant season,” said Nicole Davros, farmland wildlife research supervisor for the Minnesota Department of Natural &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/11/19/pheasant-hunting-a-great-excuse-to-get-outdoors-as-temperatures-drop/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p><em>Pheasant hunters should have plenty of harvest opportunities during the late season hunt.</em></p>
<p><img class="alignleft size-medium wp-image-21481" src="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/-4-300x225." alt="" width="300" height="225" srcset="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/-4-300x225. 300w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/-4-75x56. 75w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/-4-768x576. 768w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/-4-600x450. 600w" sizes="(max-width: 300px) 100vw, 300px" />“The hunting forecast looks really good for the latter part of the pheasant season,” said Nicole Davros, farmland wildlife research supervisor for the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. “Our August roadside survey counts were up in most areas of the pheasant range this year, and early hunting season field reports have confirmed our suspicion that we may have under-detected birds due to a late hatch.” <span id="more-21479"></span></p>
<p>Field conditions were wet enough that the corn harvest was significantly delayed again this fall.</p>
<p>“Another factor setting us up nicely for the late season hunt is that most of the corn has now been harvested. Roosters have fewer places to hide and hunters should be seeing more birds,” Davros said.</p>
<p>With the transition in weather, pheasants are using both grassland cover and winter cover such as cattail sloughs and willow thickets, according to Scott Roemhildt, DNR southern regional director.</p>
<p>“Hunters who are willing to do a little walking and work these tougher-to-reach areas will have opportunities to harvest birds,” Roemhildt said. “The colder weather in our forecast will make wetlands more accessible to hunters as the water freezes up.”</p>
<p>Both Davros and Roemhildt agree that late-season pheasant hunting is a great excuse to get away from the hustle and bustle of the holiday season, regardless of whether any roosters are put in your bag.</p>
<p>“During the hectic holiday season, pheasant hunting is a great opportunity to both stretch your legs and clear your mind,” Davros said.</p>
<p>Added Roemhildt: “It’s also a chance to introduce someone new to pheasant hunting as kids get time off from school and family comes to visit.”</p>
<p>The daily bag limit is two roosters with a possession limit of six roosters through November. On Dec. 1, the daily bag limit increases to three roosters with a possession limit of nine roosters.</p>
<p>Hunters need a small game license and a pheasant stamp to hunt pheasants in Minnesota. A small game license costs $22 for Minnesota residents age 18 to 64, and the pheasant stamp costs $7.50. Pheasant hunters 65 and older need to buy a small game license for $13.50 but are not required to buy a stamp. Hunters age 16 to 17 must buy a $5 small game license but do not need to buy a stamp, and hunters under 16 can hunt pheasants without a license or stamp.</p>
<p>Active members of the military home on leave are able to hunt without needing to purchase a small game license or stamp. Check the 2018 hunting and trapping regulations booklet for additional requirements and other license information.</p>
<p>Hunters also can purchase a Walk-In Access validation for $3 to gain additional public hunting opportunities on private land that is enrolled in the program. This year, nearly 30,000 acres of land across more than 250 sites in western and southern Minnesota are open to public hunting.</p>
<p>Minnesota’s 2018 pheasant season is open through Tuesday, Jan. 1. Shooting hours are 9 a.m. to sunset. Additional details on pheasant hunting are available at <a href="http://links.govdelivery.com:80/track?type=click&amp;enid=ZWFzPTEmbWFpbGluZ2lkPTIwMTgxMTE5Ljk3ODQwNjIxJm1lc3NhZ2VpZD1NREItUFJELUJVTC0yMDE4MTExOS45Nzg0MDYyMSZkYXRhYmFzZWlkPTEwMDEmc2VyaWFsPTE3NTY1NzExJmVtYWlsaWQ9anVsaWUuZm9yc3RlckBzdGF0ZS5tbi51cyZ1c2VyaWQ9anVsaWUuZm9yc3RlckBzdGF0ZS5tbi51cyZmbD0mZXh0cmE9TXVsdGl2YXJpYXRlSWQ9JiYm&amp;&amp;&amp;101&amp;&amp;&amp;http://www.mndnr.gov/hunting/pheasant?utm_content=&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_name=&amp;utm_source=govdelivery&amp;utm_term=">mndnr.gov/hunting/pheasant</a>. Additional details on the Walk-In Access Program are available at <a href="http://links.govdelivery.com:80/track?type=click&amp;enid=ZWFzPTEmbWFpbGluZ2lkPTIwMTgxMTE5Ljk3ODQwNjIxJm1lc3NhZ2VpZD1NREItUFJELUJVTC0yMDE4MTExOS45Nzg0MDYyMSZkYXRhYmFzZWlkPTEwMDEmc2VyaWFsPTE3NTY1NzExJmVtYWlsaWQ9anVsaWUuZm9yc3RlckBzdGF0ZS5tbi51cyZ1c2VyaWQ9anVsaWUuZm9yc3RlckBzdGF0ZS5tbi51cyZmbD0mZXh0cmE9TXVsdGl2YXJpYXRlSWQ9JiYm&amp;&amp;&amp;102&amp;&amp;&amp;http://www.mndnr.gov/walkin?utm_content=&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_name=&amp;utm_source=govdelivery&amp;utm_term=">mndnr.gov/walkin</a>.</p>
]]></content:encoded>
			</item>
		<item>
		<title>Angler sets new benchmark for northern pike state record</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/11/19/angler-sets-new-benchmark-for-northern-pike-state-record/</link>
		<pubDate>Mon, 19 Nov 2018 18:07:21 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fish and Wildlife]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fisheries]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fishing]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=21476</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[Minnesota anglers who want to catch a state record northern pike now have a new mark to beat after angler Matthew Swanson of Woodbury has claimed the record with a 45 1/4 inch northern pike caught on the Rainy River.  &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/11/19/angler-sets-new-benchmark-for-northern-pike-state-record/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Minnesota anglers who want to catch a state record northern pike now have a new mark to beat after angler Matthew Swanson of Woodbury has claimed the record with a 45 1/4 inch northern pike caught on the Rainy River. <span id="more-21476"></span></p>
<p><img class="alignleft size-medium wp-image-21477" src="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/-3-300x200." alt="" width="300" height="200" srcset="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/-3-300x200. 300w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/-3-75x50. 75w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/-3-768x512. 768w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/-3-600x400. 600w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/-3 1020w" sizes="(max-width: 300px) 100vw, 300px" />The record surpasses the first ever record set in early October when Maddy Ogg caught and released a 43 1/2 inch pike from Mille Lacs; however, Swanson reeled in his pike five months earlier, in May. The Department of Natural Resources received Swanson’s application on Oct. 29 and certified the fish soon after.</p>
<p>Swanson was on an annual Rainy River pike fishing trip with his dad and brother. Swanson reported that after three days of fishing, he had not landed any large pike, but his dad and brother had caught several over 30 inches. His father fishes spring pike with streamer flies on 30-pound test wire line. Using his dad’s setup, Swanson took a few casts and the water around his fly exploded – he had hooked a big pike.</p>
<p>After a brief fight and some careful netting, Swanson had caught the 45 1/4 inch northern pike.  They handled the large pike carefully to get a couple pictures and a length measurement before releasing the fish.</p>
<p>“Because this was to date my first and only pike on a fly, it was a very memorable experience,” Swanson said.</p>
<p>Cool spring and fall temperatures make for excellent catch-and-release conditions. The DNR announces new state records in news releases, on social media and on the DNR website. Find current records and guidelines for each type of state record at <u><a href="http://links.govdelivery.com:80/track?type=click&amp;enid=ZWFzPTEmbWFpbGluZ2lkPTIwMTgxMTE5Ljk3ODQwNjIxJm1lc3NhZ2VpZD1NREItUFJELUJVTC0yMDE4MTExOS45Nzg0MDYyMSZkYXRhYmFzZWlkPTEwMDEmc2VyaWFsPTE3NTY1NzExJmVtYWlsaWQ9anVsaWUuZm9yc3RlckBzdGF0ZS5tbi51cyZ1c2VyaWQ9anVsaWUuZm9yc3RlckBzdGF0ZS5tbi51cyZmbD0mZXh0cmE9TXVsdGl2YXJpYXRlSWQ9JiYm&amp;&amp;&amp;100&amp;&amp;&amp;http://www.mndnr.gov/recordfish?utm_content=&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_name=&amp;utm_source=govdelivery&amp;utm_term=">mndnr.gov/recordfish</a></u>.</p>
]]></content:encoded>
			</item>
		<item>
		<title>Governor’s Residence Christmas tree harvested from Nemadji State Forest</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/11/16/governors-residence-christmas-tree-harvested-from-nemadji-state-forest/</link>
		<pubDate>Fri, 16 Nov 2018 18:02:51 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[stcarrol]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Forestry]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=21470</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[The holidays are coming to the Governor’s Residence! Foresters from the Department of Natural Resources and the Conservation Corps of Minnesota harvested the official state Christmas tree Nov. 16 from the Nemadji State Forest. The tree, which is approximately 60 &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/11/16/governors-residence-christmas-tree-harvested-from-nemadji-state-forest/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>The holidays are coming to the Governor’s Residence!</p>
<p>Foresters from the Department of Natural Resources and the Conservation Corps of Minnesota harvested the official state Christmas tree Nov. 16 from the Nemadji State Forest. The tree, which is approximately 60 years old, will decorate the Governor’s Residence in St. Paul.<span id="more-21470"></span></p>
<p>“This year’s tree is absolutely gorgeous—tall, full, and almost perfectly shaped,” said Jean Mouelle, the DNR forester who selected this year’s tree. “It’s an impressive example of a balsam fir.”</p>
<a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/-2"><img class="wp-image-21472 size-medium" src="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/-2-300x169." alt="" width="300" height="169" srcset="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/-2-300x169. 300w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/-2-75x42. 75w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/-2-768x432. 768w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/-2-600x338. 600w" sizes="(max-width: 300px) 100vw, 300px" /></a>
<p>Each year, DNR staff chooses the Governor’s Christmas tree from one of Minnesota’s 59 state forests. Although the tree is always harvested on the Friday before Thanksgiving, the search for the perfect tree begins months beforehand. DNR foresters keep an eye out for a tall tree that’s nicely shaped and well filled out. The tree also needs to be in a location where it will not be damaged when dropped, and where foresters can easily remove it from the forest and load it onto a trailer.</p>
<p>The tree will be set up at the Governor’s Residence, 1006 Summit Ave., St. Paul, at 9 a.m. on Monday, Nov. 19, and lit Monday, Nov. 26. Information about viewing the tree can be found at <a href="http://www.mn.gov/admin/governors-residence/tours/schedule">www.mn.gov/admin/governors-residence/tours/schedule</a>.</p>
<p>Half a million Christmas trees are harvested from private tree farms in Minnesota each holiday season, contributing about $30 million to the state’s economy. For each tree harvested, one to three trees are planted. Real Christmas trees provide an environmentally friendly decorating option during the holidays because they store carbon during their lifespan and can be chipped for mulch when the season is over.</p>
]]></content:encoded>
			</item>
		<item>
		<title>DNR issues Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for revised Fargo-Moorhead flood diversion project</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/11/13/dnr-issues-final-supplemental-environmental-impact-statement-for-revised-fargo-moorhead-flood-diversion-project/</link>
		<pubDate>Tue, 13 Nov 2018 15:42:18 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[stcarrol]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=21465</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[Public comments invited through Nov. 29 The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources today issued a Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (Final SEIS) for the Fargo-Moorhead Flood Risk Management project. The DNR is accepting public comments on the Final SEIS until &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/11/13/dnr-issues-final-supplemental-environmental-impact-statement-for-revised-fargo-moorhead-flood-diversion-project/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p><strong><em>Public comments invited through Nov. 29</em></strong><br />
The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources today issued a Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (Final SEIS) for the Fargo-Moorhead Flood Risk Management project. The DNR is accepting public comments on the Final SEIS until 4:30 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 29.<span id="more-21465"></span><em><br />
</em></p>
<p>The Final SEIS describes the potential environmental and social effects of the revised Fargo-Moorhead flood diversion project, known as Plan B.</p>
<p>The DNR received 107 comment submittals on the Draft SEIS, which included letters, emails, and transcribed comments from a public meeting held Sept. 13 in Moorhead.</p>
<p>The DNR used those comments to make revisions and produce the Final SEIS. The Final SEIS also includes all comments that were received and responses to substantive comments.</p>
<p>“We appreciate the many thoughtful comments we received on the Draft SEIS and considered those comments carefully in developing the final document,” said Tom Landwehr, DNR commissioner.  “While the Supplemental EIS is not a decision-making document, it will be very helpful as we consider the Diversion Authority’s permit application.”</p>
<p>According to Landwehr, “Minnesota remains committed to enhancing flood risk management for developed portions of the Fargo-Moorhead area while also meeting Minnesota’s rigorous floodplain management and environmental protection standards.”</p>
<p>Broadly speaking, the Final SEIS describes the proposed project, identifies potential environmental impacts and considers mitigation and alternatives that may lessen the environmental impacts. The supplemental review, which is not an entire new EIS, focused on those aspects of the revised project that were not fully evaluated in the original Environmental Impact Statement (EIS).</p>
<p>The DNR is now seeking comments through Nov. 29 on the adequacy of the Final SEIS. An Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is declared adequate if it meets three criteria:</p>
<ol>
<li>The EIS covered the potentially significant issues and alternatives raised in scoping.</li>
<li>The EIS provided responses to substantive comments received on the Draft SEIS.</li>
<li>The EIS was prepared in compliance with the environmental review procedures established in state law.</li>
</ol>
<p>To inform the DNR’s adequacy determination, public comments on the Final SEIS should focus on these three criteria for adequacy. If the Final SEIS is determined adequate, the environmental review process for the Fargo-Moorhead project will be complete.  The DNR would then proceed to making final decisions on the dam safety/public waters work application for the project.</p>
<p>Notification of Final SEIS availability is in the Nov. 13, 2018 Environmental Quality Board (EQB) Monitor. Additionally, anyone who submitted comments will receive an individual notification that the Final SEIS is available. The Final SEIS and additional details about the proposed project and the DNR’s review process are available at <a href="http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/input/environmentalreview/fm_flood_risk/index.html">www.dnr.state.mn.us/input/environmentalreview/fm_flood_risk/index.html</a>.</p>
<p>A copy of the Final SEIS is available for public review at:</p>
<ul>
<li>DNR Library, 500 Lafayette Road, St. Paul, MN 55155.</li>
<li>DNR northwest region office, 2115 Birchmont Beach Rd. NE., Bemidji, MN 56601.</li>
<li>Minneapolis Central Library, 300 Nicollet Mall, Minneapolis, MN 55401, Government Documents, 2nd Floor.</li>
<li>Moorhead Public Library, 118 5th St. S, Moorhead, MN 56560.</li>
<li>Fergus Falls Public Library, 205 E. Hampden, Fergus Falls, MN 56537.</li>
<li>Fargo Public Library Downtown, 102 3rd Street North, Fargo, ND 58102.</li>
</ul>
<p>Written comments on the Final SEIS must be received by 4:30 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 29.<br />
Comments may be mailed to: Jill Townley, Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, 500 Lafayette Road, Box 25, St. Paul, MN 55155-4025.</p>
<p>Comments may be emailed to: <a href="mailto:environmentalrev.dnr@state.mn.us">environmentalrev.dnr@state.mn.us</a> with “Fargo-Moorhead SEIS” in the subject line. If using the email address, people should include their name, so that they can be added to the mailing list.</p>
<p>Comments may be faxed to <span class="baec5a81-e4d6-4674-97f3-e9220f0136c1" style="white-space: nowrap;">651-297-1500</span>.</p>
]]></content:encoded>
			</item>
		<item>
		<title>Stressed out? Visit a state park on Veterans Day and unwind with nature</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/11/08/stressed-out-visit-a-state-park-on-veterans-day-and-unwind-with-nature/</link>
		<pubDate>Thu, 08 Nov 2018 19:21:41 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[stcarrol]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[State Parks]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=21461</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[It’s no secret that nature helps sooth a troubled mind. Consider spending an afternoon at a state park with a veteran this Veterans Day where the “awe” factor increases as the stress level decreases. “A state park visit can provide &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/11/08/stressed-out-visit-a-state-park-on-veterans-day-and-unwind-with-nature/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>It’s no secret that nature helps sooth a troubled mind. Consider spending an afternoon at a state park with a veteran this Veterans Day where the “awe” factor increases as the stress level decreases.<span id="more-21461"></span></p>
<p>“A state park visit can provide a healthy dose of nature therapy,” said Erika Rivers, director of Minnesota State Park and Trails. “All park visitors benefit from time outdoors and for those exposed to a lot of stress, the benefits can be especially acute.”</p>
<p>Free year-round vehicle permits, providing unlimited access to all 75 Minnesota state parks and recreation areas, are now available to:</p>
<ul>
<li>active military personnel in any branch or unit of the United States Armed Forces.</li>
<li>veterans with a service-related disability.</li>
</ul>
<p>These benefits were approved by Minnesota lawmakers in 2017.</p>
<p>Studies done by the <u><a href="http://warriorinstitute.org/">Warrior Institute</a></u>, <u><a href="http://www.outwardbound.org">Outward Bound</a></u>, <u><a href="http://www.sierraclub.org/outings/military">Sierra Club</a></u> and others show that outdoor recreation enhances emotional, physical and physiological well-being.  Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is the leading injury for American veterans. An estimated 30 percent of Vietnam War veterans have had PTSD in their lifetime, and 20 percent of veterans who served in Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom have PTSD in a given year, according to the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. It is estimated that less than 30 percent of veterans with mental health issues, however, will seek help.</p>
<p>“People generally find it difficult to seek help for mental health issues,” said Jodi Dehn, who is the DNR Yellow Ribbon Program Military Outreach Representative.</p>
<p>An antidote to trauma can start with something as simple as more time spent outdoors. “The cost is minimal but the effect can be substantial,” she said. The Yellow Ribbon Program designation acknowledges companies and agencies with exceptional and ongoing records of caring, commitment and compassion for military members and their families.</p>
<p>Special programs taking place at Minnesota state parks on or near Veterans Day include:</p>
<ul>
<li><strong>Whitewater’s German POW Camp<u>,</u> 7-8 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 10, at Whitewater State Park (near Winona). </strong>Whitewater State Park once served as a prison to World War II Prisoners of War. This presentation explains how they got there, where they went later, and what life was like at the camp. For more information, call 507-312-2300.</li>
<li><strong>Veterans in the Vicinity, 11 a.m.-noon, Sunday, Nov. 11, at Sibley State Park (New London). </strong>The land at and near Sibley State Park was a site of conflict during the U.S.-Dakota War of 1862. Join a naturalist on Veteran’s Day to remember and honor all veterans with ties to West Central Minnesota and Sibley State Park. Meet at the Lakeview Campground. For more information, call 320-354-2055.</li>
</ul>
<p>To see all licenses, permits and passes that are available to military personnel and veterans, and the form of identification that an individual needs to show, visit <u><a href="http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/licenses/military/index.html">www.mndnr.gov</a></u>.</p>
<p><strong> </strong>The DNR is recognized as a Yellow Ribbon Company for its support of active and retired military personnel and their families.</p>
<p>For more information, contact the DNR Information Center at <u><a href="mailto:info.dnr@state.mn.us">info.dnr@state.mn.us</a></u> or 888-646-6367 (8 a.m.-8 p.m. Monday through Friday, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturday).</p>
<p>&nbsp;</p>
<p>&nbsp;</p>
]]></content:encoded>
			</item>
		<item>
		<title>Lakeville artist wins walleye stamp contest</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/11/01/lakeville-artist-wins-walleye-stamp-contest/</link>
		<pubDate>Thu, 01 Nov 2018 20:35:03 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fish and Wildlife]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fisheries]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fishing]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Wildlife]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=21457</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[Lakeville artist Stephen Hamrick won the Minnesota Walleye Stamp contest. Judges selected his painting from among 11 entries for the annual contest that the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources sponsors.  The 2019 walleye stamp will feature Hamrick’s painting of a &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/11/01/lakeville-artist-wins-walleye-stamp-contest/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Lakeville artist Stephen Hamrick won the Minnesota Walleye Stamp contest. Judges selected his painting from among 11 entries for the annual contest that the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources sponsors. <span id="more-21457"></span></p>
<img class="size-medium wp-image-21458" src="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/-1-300x218." alt="" width="300" height="218" srcset="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/-1-300x218. 300w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/-1-75x55. 75w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/-1-768x558. 768w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/-1-600x436. 600w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/-1 975w" sizes="(max-width: 300px) 100vw, 300px" />
<p>The 2019 walleye stamp will feature Hamrick’s painting of a walleye swimming at night under a full moon near an angler’s leech-baited hook and slip bobber. Hamrick has won a DNR stamp contest 11 times; he also has won the waterfowl, pheasant, wild turkey, trout and salmon, and walleye stamp contests.</p>
<p>The voluntary walleye stamp validation costs $5 but the DNR does not require anglers to buy it to fish for or keep walleye. For an extra 75 cents, the DNR will mail the pictorial stamp to purchasers. The DNR also sells a pictorial collectable stamp without the validation for $5.75, and sells walleye stamps year-round. Customers can purchase walleye stamps at any time, even if they already have a fishing license.</p>
<p>Judges also selected Stuart Nelson of Cloquet and Josh Evan of Mapleton as finalists in the Oct. 25 contest at DNR headquarters in St. Paul. The DNR offers no prizes for the stamp contest winner, but the winning artist retains the right to reproduce the work.</p>
<p>The DNR uses revenue from stamp sales to purchase walleye for stocking in Minnesota’s lakes. All license vendors still have the 2018 walleye stamp available for purchase. The DNR website at <a href="http://www.mndnr.gov/stamps?utm_content=&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_name=&amp;utm_source=govdelivery&amp;utm_term=">mndnr.gov/stamps</a> has more information about stamps.</p>
]]></content:encoded>
			</item>
		<item>
		<title>Archers take 237 deer at Camp Ripley</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/11/01/archers-take-237-deer-at-camp-ripley/</link>
		<pubDate>Thu, 01 Nov 2018 20:29:55 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Deer]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fish and Wildlife]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Hunting]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Wildlife]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=21455</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[Mild, windy and wet weather greeted archers at this year’s Camp Ripley bow hunts near Little Falls, and hunters took 237 deer during the four-day event from Oct. 18-19 and Oct. 27-28.  The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources issued 2,883 &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/11/01/archers-take-237-deer-at-camp-ripley/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Mild, windy and wet weather greeted archers at this year’s Camp Ripley bow hunts near Little Falls, and hunters took 237 deer during the four-day event from Oct. 18-19 and Oct. 27-28. <span id="more-21455"></span></p>
<p>The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources issued 2,883 permits, and the 2,365 participating hunters had above average success of 9.7 percent.</p>
<p>The Central Lakes College Natural Resources Program coordinated morning check-in and provided deer registration services at the hunts.</p>
<p>“We have a strong partnership with Central Lakes College,” said Beau Liddell, DNR wildlife manager at Little Falls. “They did a great job managing traffic and registering deer. The event is a worthwhile opportunity to train students pursuing careers in wildlife management.”</p>
<p>The archery hunt at Camp Ripley is an annual event. The DNR coordinates the hunts in collaboration with Central Lakes College Natural Resources Department, and the Department of Military Affairs, which manages the 53,000-acre military reservation.</p>
]]></content:encoded>
			</item>
		<item>
		<title>Parks and Trails Legacy Advisory Committee seeks applicants</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/11/01/parks-and-trails-legacy-advisory-committee-seeks-applicants-5/</link>
		<pubDate>Thu, 01 Nov 2018 20:27:25 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Legacy Amendment]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[State Parks]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Trails]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=21453</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[Applications due by Friday, Nov. 30 The Department of Natural Resources, the Metropolitan Council and the Greater Minnesota Regional Parks and Trails Commission are seeking qualified applicants to serve on the Parks and Trails Legacy Advisory Committee.  “The Parks and &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/11/01/parks-and-trails-legacy-advisory-committee-seeks-applicants-5/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p><em>Applications due by Friday, Nov. 30</em></p>
<p>The Department of Natural Resources, the Metropolitan Council and the Greater Minnesota Regional Parks and Trails Commission are seeking qualified applicants to serve on the Parks and Trails Legacy Advisory Committee. <span id="more-21453"></span></p>
<p>“The Parks and Trails Legacy Advisory Committee plays a critical role in helping us achieve the vision Minnesotans have for use of the Parks and Trails Legacy funds and creates an accessible and equitable, integrated system of state and regional parks and trails in Minnesota,” said DNR Commissioner Tom Landwehr.</p>
<p>The purpose of the Legacy Advisory Committee is to promote and coordinate implementation of the 25 Year Parks and Trails Legacy Plan. Funding recommendations for individual projects is not a part of this committee’s work. The plan can be found at <a href="http://www.legacy.leg.mn/funds/parks-trails-fund/plan?utm_content=&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_name=&amp;utm_source=govdelivery&amp;utm_term=">www.legacy.leg.mn/funds/parks-trails-fund/plan</a>.</p>
<p>The deadline for applications is Friday, Nov. 30.</p>
<p>The committee is made up of 17 members, including, to the practical extent possible, diverse geographical and demographic representation. The committee has a mixture of park and trail professionals and Minnesota residents. Among the skills desired for the committee are backgrounds in youth programs, natural resource education, resource management, marketing, new technology, tourism, and business. Committee members should have expertise in two or more of the four strategic pillars of the plan:</p>
<ul>
<li>Connect people and the outdoors.</li>
<li>Acquire land and create opportunities.</li>
<li>Take care of what we have.</li>
<li>Coordinate among partners.</li>
</ul>
<p>Terms are two years with the option of being reappointed for a maximum of three terms. Meetings are scheduled every two months around the state, with an option to attend remotely.</p>
<p>Interested candidates may complete the application form online at <a href="http://www.legacy.leg.mn/ptlac/member-application?utm_content=&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_name=&amp;utm_source=govdelivery&amp;utm_term=">www.legacy.leg.mn/ptlac/member-application</a> or print it out and return it to Paul Purman, Department of Natural Resources, Box 39, 500 Lafayette Road, St. Paul, MN 55155. Questions should be directed to Purman via phone at 651-259-5643 or email at <a href="mailto:paul.purman@state.mn.us">paul.purman@state.mn.us</a>.</p>
<p>The year 2018 marked the 10th anniversary of the passage of the Legacy Amendment by Minnesota voters, and 2019 is 10 years since the first Legacy-funded projects. The committee hosted a series of regional events during 2018 to celebrate Legacy accomplishments and engage Minnesotans on the question “What’s Your Legacy?” A final report on the regional events will be available in January.</p>
]]></content:encoded>
			</item>
		<item>
		<title>Zebra mussels confirmed in Lake Bemidji in Beltrami County</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/11/01/zebra-mussels-confirmed-in-lake-bemidji-in-beltrami-county/</link>
		<pubDate>Thu, 01 Nov 2018 20:23:29 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Aquatic Invasive Species]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=21451</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources has confirmed zebra mussels in Lake Bemidji in Beltrami County.  In July, an adult zebra mussel was found in the stomach contents of a perch caught by a Lake Bemidji State Park volunteer while &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/11/01/zebra-mussels-confirmed-in-lake-bemidji-in-beltrami-county/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources has confirmed zebra mussels in Lake Bemidji in Beltrami County. <span id="more-21451"></span></p>
<p>In July, an adult zebra mussel was found in the stomach contents of a perch caught by a Lake Bemidji State Park volunteer while fishing on the north shore. DNR investigations at that time, including diving and sampling for zebra mussel larvae, did not lead to conclusive evidence.</p>
<p>Zebra mussels were recently confirmed during planned dock and lift inspections. A Beltrami County aquatic invasive species specialist found individual adult zebra mussels on the Northwoods public access dock and on a dock near a resort on the south side of the lake.</p>
<p>Lakes connected to Lake Bemidji by navigable waters will also be listed as infested. These include Lake Marquette, Carr Lake, Lake Irving, Stump Lake and the stretch of the Mississippi River from Stump Lake to Wolf Lake.</p>
<p>“The DNR appreciates the help of Beltrami County staff who partnered with us to look for zebra mussels in Lake Bemidji,” said DNR Invasive Species Unit Supervisor Heidi Wolf.  “The diligent work of Beltrami County and our other partners around the state is invaluable.”</p>
<p>Minnesota law requires keeping docks and lifts out of the water for at least 21 days before putting them into another body of water.</p>
<p>The DNR recommends these steps for lake property owners:</p>
<ul>
<li>Look on the posts, wheels and underwater support bars of docks and lifts, as well as any parts of boats, pontoons and rafts that may have been submerged in water for an extended period.</li>
<li>Hire DNR-permitted lake service provider businesses to install or remove boats, docks, lifts and other water-related equipment. These businesses have received training on Minnesota’s aquatic invasive species laws and many have experience identifying and removing invasive species.</li>
<li>People should <a href="http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/invasives/ais/contacts.html?utm_content=&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_name=&amp;utm_source=govdelivery&amp;utm_term=">contact their area aquatic invasive species specialist</a> if they think they have discovered an invasive species that has not already been confirmed in a lake. Take a photo of any newly discovered invasive species before removing it from equipment. Save specimens or leave them in place until the DNR can investigate.</li>
</ul>
<p>More information is available at <a href="http://www.mndnr.gov/AIS?utm_content=&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_name=&amp;utm_source=govdelivery&amp;utm_term=">www.mndnr.gov/AIS</a>.</p>
]]></content:encoded>
			</item>
		<item>
		<title>DNR issues permits for NorthMet mining project in northeast Minnesota</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/11/01/dnr-issues-permits-for-northmet-mining-project-in-northeast-minnesota/</link>
		<pubDate>Thu, 01 Nov 2018 16:59:38 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Polymet]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=21447</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources announced today that it has issued permits for Poly Met Mining, Inc.’s (PolyMet’s) proposed NorthMet mining project in northeast Minnesota.  The DNR has issued the permit to mine, six water appropriation permits, two dam &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/11/01/dnr-issues-permits-for-northmet-mining-project-in-northeast-minnesota/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources announced today that it has issued permits for Poly Met Mining, Inc.’s (PolyMet’s) proposed NorthMet mining project in northeast Minnesota. <span id="more-21447"></span></p>
<p>The DNR has issued the permit to mine, six water appropriation permits, two dam safety permits, a public waters work permit, and an endangered species takings permit for the NorthMet project.</p>
<p>The permit to mine includes a financial assurance plan and wetland replacement plan.</p>
<p>Today’s action completes the DNR’s consideration of the major permits that the project needs from the DNR in order to proceed.  However, the NorthMet project still requires water and air quality permits from the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency and a wetlands permit from the Army Corps of Engineers, in addition to other local permits and approvals.</p>
<p>“No project in the history of Minnesota has been more thoroughly evaluated,” said DNR Commissioner Tom Landwehr.</p>
<p>“Based on the DNR’s review, we are confident that the project can be built, operated, and reclaimed in compliance with Minnesota’s rigorous environmental standards, which are designed to protect human health and the environment,” Landwehr said. “This does not mean that the project will not have impacts, but it does mean that the project meets Minnesota’s regulatory standards for these permits.”</p>
<p>The NorthMet project would create an open pit copper, nickel, cobalt and precious metals mine and would refurbish a portion of the former LTV Steel Mining Company processing plant. The project is located near the cities of Hoyt Lakes and Babbitt.</p>
<p><strong>Comprehensive financial assurance package<br />
</strong>The NorthMet permit to mine permit includes a comprehensive, PolyMet-funded financial assurance package designed to provide sufficient funds for the DNR to reclaim and close the mine and plant site in the event that PolyMet should fail to do so.</p>
<p>Prior to issuance of the permit to mine, the company provided $74 million in financial assurance for the construction phase of the project, which will last approximately two years. The total required financial assurance at the start of mining is currently estimated at $588 million.  In the year of peak mining activities, the DNR currently estimates the required financial assurance at approximately $1.039 billion.</p>
<p>The DNR will review the company’s financial assurance obligations annually and amounts will be adjusted as necessary to ensure that the state has sufficient funds to reclaim the site should it close unexpectedly at any point.</p>
<p>“The financial assurance package has been thoroughly vetted by independent financial experts and provides comprehensive protections for Minnesota,” said Landwehr.</p>
<p><strong>Public input results in changes<br />
</strong>Since the project was first proposed in 2004, the DNR and other state and federal agencies have thoroughly evaluated the NorthMet project, including multiple opportunities for public input on both the environmental impact statement and draft permits.</p>
<p>During the public’s review of the proposed project’s Supplemental Draft Environmental Impact Statement, the DNR and its federal agency co-leads held three public meetings and systematically reviewed approximately 58,000 comments.</p>
<p>During the permitting process, the DNR and MPCA also held two public meetings and the DNR considered more than 22,000 comments on its draft permits.</p>
<p>Several tribal governments and stakeholder groups submitted extensive and substantive comments that resulted in important changes to the NorthMet permits.</p>
<p>Examples of changes include:  additional surface and groundwater monitoring points, additional financial assurance, more specific timelines and approvals for submittal of final designs and project work plans, pilot and field testing for the tailings basin pond features, greater safety ratings for the high concentration wastewater pipeline, and additional seepage collection system requirements.</p>
<p><strong>Additional steps<br />
</strong>In issuing its permits, the DNR has completed its decision making process on the NorthMet permit applications and is not taking further public comment on the applications.</p>
<p>Prior to the DNR’s permit decisions, PolyMet has obtained from mining company Cliffs Erie certain properties associated with the former LTV taconite facility. The DNR has executed modifications to certain permits in connection with these property transfers to ensure that all permit obligations, including financial assurance, are maintained with the proper party.</p>
<p>Additionally, prior to making permit decisions, the DNR concluded it would not order a pre-decisional contest case hearing(s) regarding the permits. Detailed explanation of the agency’s decision to deny the contested case requests is included in the DNR’s findings for its permit mine decision.</p>
<p><strong>Online public information<br />
</strong>The DNR and MPCA have a joint web portal for the PolyMet project at <a href="http://www.polymet.mn.gov">polymet.mn.gov</a>. The DNR’s final permits and additional documents related to these permit decisions will be available later this afternoon via the portal or at <a href="http://www.mndnr.gov/polymet">mndnr.gov/polymet</a>.</p>
<p>The portal provides permitting-related information from both agencies, as well as links to the DNR’s earlier environmental review documents.</p>
]]></content:encoded>
			</item>
		<item>
		<title>Lake Mille Lacs winter anglers allowed 1 walleye starting Dec. 1</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/10/30/lake-mille-lacs-winter-anglers-allowed-1-walleye-starting-dec-1/</link>
		<pubDate>Tue, 30 Oct 2018 16:17:19 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fish and Wildlife]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fisheries]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fishing]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Mille Lacs]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=21444</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[Surveys show walleye population increasing, but some year classes remain below normal Winter anglers on Lake Mille Lacs will again enjoy a walleye harvest this winter for the third season in a row, according to the Department of Natural Resources. &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/10/30/lake-mille-lacs-winter-anglers-allowed-1-walleye-starting-dec-1/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p><em>Surveys show walleye population increasing, but some year classes remain below normal</em></p>
<p>Winter anglers on Lake Mille Lacs will again enjoy a walleye harvest this winter for the third season in a row, according to the Department of Natural Resources. Similar to last season, anglers will be allowed to keep walleye on Mille Lacs starting Saturday, Dec. 1, with no bait restrictions and a limit of one walleye between 21-23 inches, or one fish over 28 inches. <span id="more-21444"></span></p>
<p>Winter regulations are set after completion of the DNR&#8217;s annual fall gill net assessment on Mille Lacs. In 2018, this assessment was supplemented by a population estimate, in which the DNR catches fish in the spring, marks them, and later recaptures them. While studies indicate the walleye population on Mille Lacs is increasing, some year classes remain below normal or average.</p>
<p>“It’s good news that anglers will be able to harvest walleye again this winter,” said Tom Landwehr, DNR commissioner. “We’re also encouraged to see evidence that our conservative approach to Mille Lacs is paying off to the point that we’re seeing population increases on this renowned fishing lake.”</p>
<p>According to the results of the 2018 population estimate, the abundance of walleye 14 inches and longer in the lake was 727,000 fish. This is up significantly from the population estimates in 2013 and 2014, both of which were around 250,000 fish.</p>
<p>The fall gill net assessment also showed that the total pounds of mature walleye sampled  increased significantly from 18.9 pounds per net last year to 27.7 pounds per net this year, mostly due to an increase in mature females. Because of this result, the DNR selected a regulation that allows anglers to keep walleye from 21-23 inches, which focuses the harvest on mature female fish.</p>
<p>The DNR believes the population of mature female walleye can sustain harvest because their numbers are at sufficient levels to ensure good production of fry (baby walleye) in the spring.</p>
<p><strong>2013 fish still strong, but stronger year classes needed</strong><br />
While hopeful for a continued increase, the DNR is taking a cautious approach to interpreting the results of the population estimates. The 2013 year class (or fish hatched that year) continues to dominate the population, accounting for about 40 percent of the fish caught, but year classes hatched since 2013 show mixed results.</p>
<p>The 2014 and 2015 year classes remain below normal. The 2016 year class, which is now 13-15 inches in length, appears close to average compared to the last 15 years. This is significant because if it survives it will only be the second average-or-above year class since 2008. The 2017 year class, now between 9 and 12 inches in length, was well represented in the gill nets, but it’s too early to tell whether these fish will comprise an above average year class.</p>
<p>“Over time we want to let anglers keep more fish, but it is critical that population assessments continue to show surviving and self-sustaining year classes of walleye,” said Brad Parsons, DNR fisheries chief. “We’ve seen promising year classes in past years fail to survive to older ages. Opening up additional harvest too fast or too soon could jeopardize the population increases we’re seeing.”</p>
<p>The fall assessment also examines food abundance for walleye and walleye health. Perch and tullibee are the primary food source for Mille Lacs’ walleye. Perch from 0 to 2 years old were caught in low numbers, and the number of young-of-year tullibee caught also was low. Walleye condition or “plumpness” reflects these results and remained lower than recent averages.</p>
<p>Low forage levels usually mean the walleye bite is good because there is less food available for fish to eat, making an angler’s bait all the more attractive.</p>
<p>“We expect the walleye bite to be quite good on Mille Lacs this winter, which means ice anglers may experience a lot of fishing action out on the lake,” Parsons said.</p>
<p>Complete winter regulation information for Mille Lacs is available on the DNR website at <a href="http://www.mndnr.gov/millelacslake">mndnr.gov/millelacslake</a>.</p>
]]></content:encoded>
			</item>
		<item>
		<title>Zebra mussels confirmed in Lake Riley, Carver County</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/10/29/zebra-mussels-confirmed-in-lake-riley-carver-county/</link>
		<pubDate>Mon, 29 Oct 2018 19:49:14 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Aquatic Invasive Species]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fish and Wildlife]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fisheries]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fishing]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=21441</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[Fall is a key time of year to check for invasive species The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources has confirmed zebra mussels in Lake Riley in Carver County.  A lake service provider business contacted the DNR after finding juvenile zebra &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/10/29/zebra-mussels-confirmed-in-lake-riley-carver-county/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p><em>Fall is a key time of year to check for invasive species</em></p>
<p>The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources has confirmed zebra mussels in Lake Riley in Carver County. <span id="more-21441"></span></p>
<p>A lake service provider business contacted the DNR after finding juvenile zebra mussels on docks and lifts they were removing from the lake for the season. Riley Purgatory Bluff Creek Watershed District staff searched five locations around the perimeter of the lake and found zebra mussels at every site. They recorded a total of 91 zebra mussels on a variety of surfaces around the lake.</p>
<p>“It helps a lot when lake property owners, lake service businesses and others notify us when they’ve spotted an invasive species,” said DNR Invasive Species Unit Supervisor Heidi Wolf. “We also appreciate the good work of the Riley Purgatory Bluff Creek Watershed District and their early detection and monitoring program.”</p>
<p>Minnesota law requires keeping docks and lifts out of the water for at least 21 days before putting them into another body of water.</p>
<p>The DNR recommends these steps for lake property owners:</p>
<ul>
<li>Look on the posts, wheels and underwater support bars of docks and lifts, as well as any parts of boats, pontoons and rafts that may have been submerged in water for an extended period.</li>
<li>Hire DNR-permitted lake service provider businesses to install or remove boats, docks, lifts and other water-related equipment. These businesses have received training on Minnesota’s aquatic invasive species laws and many have experience identifying and removing invasive species.</li>
<li>People should <a href="http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/invasives/ais/contacts.html?utm_content=&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_name=&amp;utm_source=govdelivery&amp;utm_term=">contact their area aquatic invasive species specialist</a> if they think they have discovered an invasive species that has not already been confirmed in a lake. Take a photo of any newly discovered invasive species before removing it from equipment. Save specimens or leave them in place until the DNR can investigate.</li>
</ul>
<p>More information is available at <a href="http://www.mndnr.gov/AIS?utm_content=&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_name=&amp;utm_source=govdelivery&amp;utm_term=">www.mndnr.gov/AIS</a>.</p>
]]></content:encoded>
			</item>
		<item>
		<title>Zebra mussels confirmed in several central Minnesota lakes</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/10/29/zebra-mussels-confirmed-in-several-central-minnesota-lakes/</link>
		<pubDate>Mon, 29 Oct 2018 19:48:02 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Aquatic Invasive Species]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fish and Wildlife]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fisheries]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fishing]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=21439</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources has confirmed zebra mussels in Koetter Lake in Stearns County, Mound Lake in Todd County and Crookneck Lake in Morrison County.  A property owner on Koetter Lake in the Cedar Island basin contacted the &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/10/29/zebra-mussels-confirmed-in-several-central-minnesota-lakes/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources has confirmed zebra mussels in Koetter Lake in Stearns County, Mound Lake in Todd County and Crookneck Lake in Morrison County. <span id="more-21439"></span></p>
<p>A property owner on Koetter Lake in the Cedar Island basin contacted the DNR after finding adult zebra mussels on a dock and boat lift being removed from the lake for the season. DNR invasive species staff confirmed several half-inch zebra mussels.</p>
<p>The lakes connected by the Sauk River between Sauk Lake and Becker Lake, and that section of the Sauk River, will also be added to the infested waters list. These lakes include Melrose, Becker, Horseshoe, Zumwalde, Schneider, Great Northern, Cedar Island, East Lake, Little Lake, Cedar Island Main Bay and Mud Lake.</p>
<p>A property owner on Mound Lake contacted the DNR after finding adult zebra mussels on a dock and boat lift being removed from the lake for the season. Others subsequently contacted the DNR after finding zebra mussels in several other parts of the lake. DNR invasive species staff confirmed that zebra mussels are widely distributed in the lake.</p>
<p>DNR staff searched Crookneck Lake this summer, after an initial report of a single zebra mussel. They did not find additional zebra mussels at that time, but recently confirmed an adult zebra mussel on a dock being removed by DNR Parks and Trails staff from the public access.</p>
<p>Minnesota law requires keeping docks and lifts out of the water for at least 21 days before putting them into another body of water.</p>
<p>The DNR recommends these steps for lake property owners:</p>
<ul>
<li>Look on the posts, wheels and underwater support bars of docks and lifts, as well as any parts of boats, pontoons and rafts that may have been submerged in water for an extended period.</li>
<li>Hire DNR-permitted lake service provider businesses to install or remove boats, docks, lifts and other water-related equipment. These businesses have received training on Minnesota’s aquatic invasive species laws and many have experience identifying and removing invasive species.</li>
<li>People should <a href="http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/invasives/ais/contacts.html?utm_content=&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_name=&amp;utm_source=govdelivery&amp;utm_term=">contact their area aquatic invasive species specialist</a> if they think they have discovered an invasive species that has not already been confirmed in a lake. Take a photo of any newly discovered invasive species before removing it from equipment. Save specimens or leave them in place until the DNR can investigate.</li>
</ul>
<p>More information is available at <a href="http://www.mndnr.gov/AIS?utm_content=&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_name=&amp;utm_source=govdelivery&amp;utm_term=">www.mndnr.gov/AIS</a>.</p>
]]></content:encoded>
			</item>
		<item>
		<title>Deer season opens this weekend</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/10/29/deer-season-opens-this-weekend/</link>
		<pubDate>Mon, 29 Oct 2018 15:51:58 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[CWD]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Deer]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fish and Wildlife]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Hunting]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Wildlife]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=21432</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[Minnesota’s firearms deer season begins a half-hour before sunrise on Saturday, Nov. 3, and the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources expects half a million hunters to participate.  Some points to remember: Hunters will have additional deer hunting opportunities because deer &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/10/29/deer-season-opens-this-weekend/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Minnesota’s firearms deer season begins a half-hour before sunrise on Saturday, Nov. 3, and the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources expects half a million hunters to participate. <span id="more-21432"></span></p>
<p><img class="alignleft size-medium wp-image-21433" src="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/-11-300x168." alt="" width="300" height="168" srcset="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/-11-300x168. 300w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/-11-75x42. 75w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/-11-768x431. 768w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/-11-600x337. 600w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/-11 975w" sizes="(max-width: 300px) 100vw, 300px" />Some points to remember:</p>
<ul>
<li>Hunters will have additional deer hunting opportunities because deer numbers continue to rebound across the state. Many areas now have populations at or above goal levels.</li>
</ul>
<ul>
<li>Hunters should follow the three tenets of safe firearms handling: Treat each firearm as if it is loaded by keeping finger off the trigger; always control the muzzle of the firearm; and be sure of target and what is beyond. Tree stand accidents are the leading cause of injury to hunters, so it’s always important they wear a safety harness and follow other safety guidelines.</li>
<li>The DNR requires hunters in central, north-central and southeast Minnesota (including deer permit area 255) to have their harvested deer tested for chronic wasting disease during opening weekend of the season on Saturday, Nov. 3 and Sunday, Nov. 4. Mandatory CWD testing also will occur in much of southeast Minnesota during the opening weekend of the 3B season, Saturday, Nov. 17, and Sunday, Nov. 18. During both periods, stations will be open from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. Hunters can find information about CWD testing locations and procedures at <a href="http://links.govdelivery.com:80/track?type=click&amp;enid=ZWFzPTEmbWFpbGluZ2lkPTIwMTgxMDI5Ljk2ODc2NTAxJm1lc3NhZ2VpZD1NREItUFJELUJVTC0yMDE4MTAyOS45Njg3NjUwMSZkYXRhYmFzZWlkPTEwMDEmc2VyaWFsPTE3NTU4NDMwJmVtYWlsaWQ9anVsaWUuZm9yc3RlckBzdGF0ZS5tbi51cyZ1c2VyaWQ9anVsaWUuZm9yc3RlckBzdGF0ZS5tbi51cyZmbD0mZXh0cmE9TXVsdGl2YXJpYXRlSWQ9JiYm&amp;&amp;&amp;100&amp;&amp;&amp;http://www.mndnr.gov/cwd?utm_content=&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_name=&amp;utm_source=govdelivery&amp;utm_term=">mndnr.gov/cwd</a> and in the 2018 Minnesota Hunting and Trapping Regulations booklet.</li>
<li>Hunters can find deer hunting information at <a href="http://links.govdelivery.com:80/track?type=click&amp;enid=ZWFzPTEmbWFpbGluZ2lkPTIwMTgxMDI5Ljk2ODc2NTAxJm1lc3NhZ2VpZD1NREItUFJELUJVTC0yMDE4MTAyOS45Njg3NjUwMSZkYXRhYmFzZWlkPTEwMDEmc2VyaWFsPTE3NTU4NDMwJmVtYWlsaWQ9anVsaWUuZm9yc3RlckBzdGF0ZS5tbi51cyZ1c2VyaWQ9anVsaWUuZm9yc3RlckBzdGF0ZS5tbi51cyZmbD0mZXh0cmE9TXVsdGl2YXJpYXRlSWQ9JiYm&amp;&amp;&amp;101&amp;&amp;&amp;https://www.dnr.state.mn.us/hunting/deer/index.html?utm_content=&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_name=&amp;utm_source=govdelivery&amp;utm_term=">mndnr.</a><a href="http://links.govdelivery.com:80/track?type=click&amp;enid=ZWFzPTEmbWFpbGluZ2lkPTIwMTgxMDI5Ljk2ODc2NTAxJm1lc3NhZ2VpZD1NREItUFJELUJVTC0yMDE4MTAyOS45Njg3NjUwMSZkYXRhYmFzZWlkPTEwMDEmc2VyaWFsPTE3NTU4NDMwJmVtYWlsaWQ9anVsaWUuZm9yc3RlckBzdGF0ZS5tbi51cyZ1c2VyaWQ9anVsaWUuZm9yc3RlckBzdGF0ZS5tbi51cyZmbD0mZXh0cmE9TXVsdGl2YXJpYXRlSWQ9JiYm&amp;&amp;&amp;102&amp;&amp;&amp;https://www.dnr.state.mn.us/hunting/deer/index.html?utm_content=&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_name=&amp;utm_source=govdelivery&amp;utm_term="> gov/hunting/deer</a> and join in on social media using #DeerCampMN. They can direct hunting questions to the DNR Information Center at 651-296-6157 or 888-646-6367, from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. weekdays and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays.</li>
</ul>
]]></content:encoded>
			</item>
		<item>
		<title>Zebra mussels confirmed in Elkhorn Lake in Kandiyohi County</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/10/25/zebra-mussels-confirmed-in-elkhorn-lake-in-kandiyohi-county/</link>
		<pubDate>Thu, 25 Oct 2018 19:13:56 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fish and Wildlife]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fisheries]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=21428</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[Fall is a key time of year to check for invasive species The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources has confirmed zebra mussels in Elkhorn Lake in Kandiyohi County.  DNR fisheries staff initially found one zebra mussel on the northwest side &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/10/25/zebra-mussels-confirmed-in-elkhorn-lake-in-kandiyohi-county/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p><em>Fall is a key time of year to check for invasive species</em></p>
<p>The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources has confirmed zebra mussels in Elkhorn Lake in Kandiyohi County. <span id="more-21428"></span></p>
<p>DNR fisheries staff initially found one zebra mussel on the northwest side of the lake. Three DNR staff performed a dive search that did not reveal additional zebra mussels. DNR staff subsequently found individual adult zebra mussels while searching equipment in the water on opposite sides of the lake.</p>
<p>Minnesota law requires keeping docks and lifts out of the water for at least 21 days before putting them into another body of water.</p>
<p>The DNR recommends these steps for lake property owners:</p>
<ul>
<li>Look on the posts, wheels and underwater support bars of docks and lifts, as well as any parts of boats, pontoons and rafts that may have been submerged in water for an extended period.</li>
<li>Hire DNR-permitted lake service provider businesses to install or remove boats, docks, lifts and other water-related equipment. These businesses have received training on Minnesota’s aquatic invasive species laws and many have experience identifying and removing invasive species.</li>
<li>People should <a href="http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/invasives/ais/contacts.html?utm_content=&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_name=&amp;utm_source=govdelivery&amp;utm_term=">contact their area aquatic invasive species specialist</a> if they think they have discovered an invasive species that has not already been confirmed in a lake. Take a photo of any newly discovered invasive species before removing it from equipment. Save specimens or leave them in place until the DNR can investigate.</li>
</ul>
<p>More information is available at <a href="http://www.mndnr.gov/AIS?utm_content=&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_name=&amp;utm_source=govdelivery&amp;utm_term=">www.mndnr.gov/AIS</a>.</p>
]]></content:encoded>
			</item>
		<item>
		<title>Zebra mussels confirmed in Lake Sarah in Murray County</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/10/25/zebra-mussels-confirmed-in-lake-sarah-in-murray-county/</link>
		<pubDate>Thu, 25 Oct 2018 19:09:59 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Aquatic Invasive Species]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fish and Wildlife]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fisheries]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=21426</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[Fall is a key time of year to check for invasive species The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources has confirmed zebra mussels in Lake Sarah in Murray County.  A lake service provider business contacted the DNR after finding zebra mussels &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/10/25/zebra-mussels-confirmed-in-lake-sarah-in-murray-county/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p><em>Fall is a key time of year to check for invasive species</em></p>
<p>The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources has confirmed zebra mussels in Lake Sarah in Murray County. <span id="more-21426"></span></p>
<p>A lake service provider business contacted the DNR after finding zebra mussels on docks they removed from the lake for the season. DNR staff surveyed six locations around the lake and found multiple adult zebra mussels at all six locations.</p>
<p>The DNR also plans to bring in a conservation officer with a K9 trained to locate zebra mussels, to search other equipment at a nearby marina.</p>
<p>“It helps a lot when lake property owners, lake service businesses and others notify us when they’ve spotted an invasive species,” said DNR Invasive Species Unit Supervisor Heidi Wolf.</p>
<p>Minnesota law requires keeping docks and lifts out of the water for at least 21 days before putting them into another body of water.</p>
<p>The DNR recommends these steps for lake property owners:</p>
<ul>
<li>Look on the posts, wheels and underwater support bars of docks and lifts, as well as any parts of boats, pontoons and rafts that may have been submerged in water for an extended period.</li>
<li>Hire DNR-permitted lake service provider businesses to install or remove boats, docks, lifts and other water-related equipment. These businesses have received training on Minnesota’s aquatic invasive species laws and many have experience identifying and removing invasive species.</li>
<li>People should <a href="http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/invasives/ais/contacts.html?utm_content=&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_name=&amp;utm_source=govdelivery&amp;utm_term=">contact their area aquatic invasive species specialist</a> if they think they have discovered an invasive species that has not already been confirmed in a lake. Take a photo of any newly discovered invasive species before removing it from equipment. Save specimens or leave them in place until the DNR can investigate.</li>
</ul>
<p>More information is available at <a href="http://www.mndnr.gov/AIS?utm_content=&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_name=&amp;utm_source=govdelivery&amp;utm_term=">www.mndnr.gov/AIS</a>.</p>
]]></content:encoded>
			</item>
		<item>
		<title>Whitefish, tullibee sport-netting to open on Shagawa, Bear Island, Ojibway lakes</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/10/23/whitefish-tullibee-sport-netting-to-open-on-shagawa-bear-island-ojibway-lakes-2/</link>
		<pubDate>Tue, 23 Oct 2018 19:59:32 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[chzeppel]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Fisheries]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fishing]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Region 2-NE]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Tower]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=21421</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[Dates have been set for recreational netting for whitefish and tullibee (cisco) on Shagawa, Bear Island and Ojibway lakes in the Tower fisheries work area, according to the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. These lakes are Schedule I Lakes, which &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/10/23/whitefish-tullibee-sport-netting-to-open-on-shagawa-bear-island-ojibway-lakes-2/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Dates have been set for recreational netting for whitefish and tullibee (cisco) on Shagawa, Bear Island and Ojibway lakes in the Tower fisheries work area, according to the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.<span id="more-21421"></span></p>
<p>These lakes are Schedule I Lakes, which are more susceptible to sudden changes that impact water temperatures, and are opened and closed on a 48-hour notice posted at lake accesses, other public places, and the DNR website.</p>
<p>Schedule I Lakes (48 hour notice)</p>
<ul>
<li>Shagawa, open to netting Thursday, Nov. 1  through Sunday, Nov. 25, 2018  (minimum 3.5 inch mesh size).</li>
<li>Bear Island &amp; Ojibway lakes, open to netting Saturday, Nov. 17 through Sunday, Dec. 16, 2018 (minimum 1.75 inch mesh size).</li>
</ul>
<p>Shagawa Lake is designated as infested with spiny waterflea so netters are encouraged to review rules that help prevent the spread of aquatic invasive species.</p>
<p>About 700 people obtain special permits to net for whitefish-tullibee each year. Fishing regulations require that netters purchase both a whitefish netting license and angling license. The DNR bases netting schedules on expected water temperatures, fish abundance and vulnerability of game fish. As the water temperature cools, game fish head to deeper water and whitefish-tullibee come to shallow water for fall spawning.  Netting is allowed when there is little chance that game fish populations would be negatively impacted by recreational netting in shallow water.</p>
<p>Find information about sport netting by lake, minimum mesh sizes, and fishing regulations at <a href="http://files.dnr.state.mn.us/rlp/regulations/fishing/whitefish-tullibee.pdf">http://files.dnr.state.mn.us/rlp/regulations/fishing/whitefish-tullibee.pdf</a> or contact the DNR’s Tower area office at 650 Highway 169, Tower, MN 55790, or call 218-300-7802.</p>
]]></content:encoded>
			</item>
		<item>
		<title>DNR names Cynthia Osmundson to lead Nongame Wildlife Program</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/10/22/dnr-names-cynthia-osmundson-to-lead-nongame-wildlife-program/</link>
		<pubDate>Mon, 22 Oct 2018 18:37:31 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fish and Wildlife]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Wildlife]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=21414</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources has announced that regional wildlife manager Cynthia Osmundson will become the supervisor of the agency’s Nongame Wildlife Program, effective next month. Osmundson will replace the recently retired Carrol Henderson.  “Minnesotans have been strong supporters &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/10/22/dnr-names-cynthia-osmundson-to-lead-nongame-wildlife-program/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources has announced that regional wildlife manager Cynthia Osmundson will become the supervisor of the agency’s Nongame Wildlife Program, effective next month. Osmundson will replace the recently retired Carrol Henderson. <span id="more-21414"></span></p>
<p>“Minnesotans have been strong supporters of the state’s nongame program, and it’s my desire to build on that success and continue to connect people with wildlife,” Osmundson said.</p>
<img class="size-medium wp-image-21415" src="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/-10-248x300." alt="Cynthia Osmundson" width="248" height="300" srcset="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/-10-248x300. 248w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/-10-62x75. 62w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/-10-768x927. 768w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/-10-497x600. 497w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/-10 1137w" sizes="(max-width: 248px) 100vw, 248px" />
<p>The donor-supported DNR Nongame Wildlife Program works to help more than 700 species of Minnesota wildlife thrive. Nongame wildlife are species that are not legally hunted, with a focus on species that are rare, declining or vulnerable to decline.</p>
<p>Minnesota’s Wildlife Action Plan is an important guide for this work. This partnership-based, 10-year conservation plan is designed to ensure the long-term health and viability of Minnesota&#8217;s wildlife and to enhance opportunities for people to enjoy it.</p>
<p>“We are so fortunate to inherit the strong foundation Carrol Henderson and his team of wildlife professionals have built over the years,” Osmundson said.</p>
<p>Osmundson most recently served as regional wildlife manager in the DNR’s Central Region, where she and her team focused on key priorities affecting the 50,000 acres of wildlife habitat in 23 counties including the Minneapolis/St. Paul metro area, and outreach to diverse communities.</p>
<p>Before that, Osmundson was the statewide forest habitat coordinator in the DNR Wildlife Section. She has also worked as a planner for the Minnesota Forest Resources Council and as an assistant refuge manager in Montana and Wisconsin with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.</p>
<p>Born and raised in Minnesota, Osmundson earned her bachelor’s degree in zoology from the University of Montana and a master’s degree in wildlife biology from the University of Wyoming. While there, she had opportunities to trap and tag grizzly bears, as well as raft the Colorado River in search of endangered fish and peregrine falcons.</p>
<p>More information about the DNR Nongame Wildlife Program can be found at mndnr.gov/nongame.</p>
]]></content:encoded>
			</item>
		<item>
		<title>Angler sets first catch-and-release record for northern pike</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/10/22/angler-sets-first-catch-and-release-record-for-northern-pike/</link>
		<pubDate>Mon, 22 Oct 2018 18:34:31 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fish and Wildlife]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fisheries]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Mille Lacs]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=21411</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[A 43 1/2 inch pike caught by a member of the Women Anglers of Minnesota on Mille Lacs Lake sets the first northern pike state record in the Department of Natural Resources’ catch-and-release category.  Angler Maddy Ogg caught and released &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/10/22/angler-sets-first-catch-and-release-record-for-northern-pike/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>A 43 1/2 inch pike caught by a member of the Women Anglers of Minnesota on Mille Lacs Lake sets the first northern pike state record in the Department of Natural Resources’ catch-and-release category. <span id="more-21411"></span></p>
<p><img class="alignleft size-medium wp-image-21412" src="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/-9-300x225." alt="" width="300" height="225" srcset="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/-9-300x225. 300w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/-9-75x56. 75w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/-9-768x576. 768w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/-9-600x450. 600w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/-9 1500w" sizes="(max-width: 300px) 100vw, 300px" />Angler Maddy Ogg caught and released the huge pike Oct. 6 during what she described as a cold and windy day of fishing. She and companions Mike Buckingham and Jenni Buckingham got an early start that morning, soon landing two fish at the same time.</p>
<p>“On the way to the lake that morning, we saw eight bald eagles and shortly after we started fishing, we landed a double – I knew it was going to be a good day of fishing,” Ogg said.</p>
<p>Five hours later, while trolling the edges of plants in 12 feet of water, Maddy had a strike that bent her rod hard. Even though most record-fish stories include a long dramatic battle between fish and angler, fortune was going their way.</p>
<p>“I had to reel fast because the fish swam towards the boat, causing nearly constant slack in the line,” Ogg said.</p>
<p>She landed the pike and now claims the first Minnesota catch-and-release state record for the species. While pike can often be lively once in a boat, in this case the cool temperatures and calm behavior of Maddy’s pike made for an outstanding catch-and-release scenario.</p>
<p>While the 43 1/2 inch pike may have set the record, it likely will not be the only trophy pike pulled from the big lake. Mille Lacs has a growing reputation as a trophy pike fishery, with some fish reaching the mid- to high -40 inch and range and exceeding 20 pounds.</p>
<p>There are two kinds of Minnesota state records: one for catching and keeping the biggest fish in each species based on certified weight; and the other for the length of a caught and released muskellunge, northern pike, lake sturgeon or flathead catfish.</p>
<p>The DNR announces new state records in news releases, on social media and on the DNR website. Find current records and guidelines for each type of state record at <a href="http://www.mndnr.gov/recordfish">mndnr.gov/recordfish</a>.</p>
]]></content:encoded>
			</item>
	</channel>
</rss>
s

Paul Novotny / Owner

Rocket / General Manager

Spike / Sales

Eric Bothun / Drury Outdoors

Jason Irish / TV / DVD Celeb