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	<title>MN Department of Natural Resources &#8212; News Releases</title>
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	<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us</link>
	<description>MN Department of Natural Resources -- News Releases</description>
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		<title>Flowering rush confirmed in Grants Lake in Douglas County</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/07/18/flowering-rush-confirmed-in-grants-lake-in-douglas-county/</link>
		<pubDate>Thu, 18 Jul 2019 18:45:34 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Aquatic Invasive Species]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=22088</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[First time invasive aquatic plant has been confirmed in county The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources has confirmed small patches of flowering rush, an invasive aquatic plant, in Grants Lake in Douglas County.  The DNR has begun removing the plants &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/07/18/flowering-rush-confirmed-in-grants-lake-in-douglas-county/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p><em>First time invasive aquatic plant has been confirmed in county</em></p>
<p>The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources has confirmed small patches of flowering rush, an invasive aquatic plant, in Grants Lake in Douglas County. <span id="more-22088"></span></p>
<p>The DNR has begun removing the plants by hand. Hand removal can be successful in small populations like this one.  DNR staff will monitor the site for any regrowth and take appropriate further control measures if required.</p>
<p>Flowering rush is a weed-like plant with pink flowers that can overtake habitat, crowd out native species and make it difficult for boats to access open water. It is a perennial that grows one to four feet high along shores in shallow, slow-moving water.</p>
<p>In deeper water, it can grow in a submerged form that does not produce flowers. It flowers in early summer through mid-fall. Flowering rush can be difficult to identify when not in flower, as it closely resembles many beneficial native shoreland plants such as the common bulrush.</p>
<p>People can spread flowering rush primarily by moving water-related equipment and illegally releasing water garden plants into public waters. It reproduces by vegetative spread of small onion-like buds called bulbils, which can be hidden in mud and debris and can stick to boots, waders and other fishing and hunting gear.</p>
<p>Flowering rush is a prohibited invasive species in Minnesota, which means it is unlawful (a misdemeanor) to possess, import, purchase, transport or introduce this species except under a permit for disposal, control, research or education.</p>
<p>Whether or not a lake is listed for any invasive species, Minnesota law requires boaters and anglers to:</p>
<ul>
<li><strong>Clean</strong> watercraft and trailers of aquatic plants and prohibited invasive species.</li>
<li><strong>Drain</strong> all water by removing drain plugs and keeping them out during transport.</li>
<li><strong>Dispose</strong> of unwanted bait in the trash.</li>
</ul>
<p>Some invasive species are small and difficult to see at the access. To remove or kill them, take one or more of the following precautions before moving to another waterbody:</p>
<ul>
<li>Spray with high-pressure water.</li>
<li>Rinse with very hot water (120 degrees for at least two minutes or 140 degrees for at least 10 seconds).</li>
<li>Dry for at least five days.</li>
</ul>
<p>People should <a href="http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/invasives/ais/contacts.html?utm_content=&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_name=&amp;utm_source=govdelivery&amp;utm_term=">contact an area DNR aquatic invasive species specialist</a> if they think they have found flowering rush or any other invasive species that has not already been confirmed in a lake.</p>
<p>More information is available at <a href="http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/invasives/aquatic/index.html?utm_medium=email&amp;utm_source=govdelivery">mndnr.gov/ais</a>.</p>
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		<title>Zebra mussels confirmed in Lake Alexander in Morrison County</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/07/18/zebra-mussels-confirmed-in-lake-alexander-in-morrison-county/</link>
		<pubDate>Thu, 18 Jul 2019 17:14:50 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Aquatic Invasive Species]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fish and Wildlife]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fisheries]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fishing]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=22086</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources has confirmed zebra mussels in Lake Alexander in Morrison County.  DNR divers found two adult zebra mussels, about one-half inch in length, near Soldiers Island on the west side of the lake, and two &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/07/18/zebra-mussels-confirmed-in-lake-alexander-in-morrison-county/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources has confirmed zebra mussels in Lake Alexander in Morrison County. <span id="more-22086"></span></p>
<p>DNR divers found two adult zebra mussels, about one-half inch in length, near Soldiers Island on the west side of the lake, and two more zebra mussels of the same size at the east boat access. Reports of zebra mussels in 2018 in another part of the lake could not be substantiated, despite numerous searches in 2018 and 2019.</p>
<p>Whether or not a lake is listed as infested, Minnesota law requires boaters and anglers to:</p>
<ul>
<li><strong>Clean</strong> watercraft and trailers of aquatic plants and prohibited invasive species.</li>
<li><strong>Drain</strong> all water by removing drain plugs and keeping them out during transport.</li>
<li><strong>Dispose</strong> of unwanted bait in the trash.</li>
</ul>
<p>Some invasive species are small and difficult to see at the access. To remove or kill them, take one or more of the following precautions before moving to another waterbody:</p>
<ul>
<li>Spray with high-pressure water.</li>
<li>Rinse with very hot water (120 degrees for at least two minutes or 140 degrees for at least 10 seconds).</li>
<li>Dry for at least five days.</li>
</ul>
<p>Zebra mussels can compete with native species for food and habitat, cut the feet of swimmers, reduce the performance of boat motors, and cause damage to water intake pipes.</p>
<p>People should <a href="http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/invasives/ais/contacts.html?utm_content=&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_name=&amp;utm_source=govdelivery&amp;utm_term=">contact an area DNR aquatic invasive species specialist</a> if they think they have found zebra mussels or any other invasive species that has not already been confirmed in a lake.</p>
<p>More information is available at <a href="http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/invasives/aquatic/index.html?utm_medium=email&amp;utm_source=govdelivery">mndnr.gov/ais</a>.</p>
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		<title>West Nile virus impacting Minnesota loon population</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/07/18/west-nile-virus-impacting-minnesota-loon-population/</link>
		<pubDate>Thu, 18 Jul 2019 16:51:21 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fish and Wildlife]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Management]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Wildlife]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=22084</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[A recent uptick in reports of dead loons and test results indicate an impact from West Nile virus (WNV), according to nongame wildlife staff at the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.  The Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory at the University of Minnesota &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/07/18/west-nile-virus-impacting-minnesota-loon-population/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>A recent uptick in reports of dead loons and test results indicate an impact from West Nile virus (WNV), according to nongame wildlife staff at the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. <span id="more-22084"></span></p>
<p>The Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory at the University of Minnesota confirmed WNV as the cause of death in two of three dead loons from northeastern Minnesota earlier this month. Wildlife staff are receiving a small but noticeable increase in calls from people finding dead loons in northeastern Minnesota this summer.</p>
<p>WNV was first confirmed in Minnesota in 2002 and was documented as a cause of loon mortality in Minnesota as early as 2005. It is not uncommon for people, animals and birds to be exposed to WNV through mosquito bites. Most people and animals successfully fight off the virus and develop antibodies against future infection. Some birds, like loons, crows and other corvids, are especially susceptible to the infection. Researchers are attempting to discover the rates of infection among ruffed grouse.</p>
<p>Loons can die from a variety of illnesses and injuries and individual bird deaths are a normal occurrence and not cause for alarm.</p>
<p>“Minnesotans love our loons and it’s concerning for people to find them dead. When we start seeing multiple birds dying on a single lake, we want to know about it so we can start tracking the information and determine when further testing is warranted,” said nongame wildlife specialist Gaea Crozier. “While there isn’t a way to treat the West Nile virus infection, knowing the cause can help us rule out other, preventable causes of mortality.”</p>
<p>Lake homeowners and other lake users who observe two or more dead loons on a single lake with no obvious injury or cause of death are asked to email the nearest DNR nongame wildlife staff for tracking:</p>
<ul>
<li>Bemidji/northwest area: <a href="christine.herwig@state.mn.us">Christine Herwig</a>.</li>
<li>Grand Rapids/northeast area: <a href="gaea.e.crozier@state.mn.us">Gaea Crozier.</a></li>
<li>Metro/Central Minnesota: <a href="lori.naumann@state.mn.us">Lori Naumann</a>,</li>
<li>New Ulm/southern Minnesota: <a href="lisa.gelvin-innvaer@state.mn.us">Lisa Gelvin-Innvaer.</a></li>
</ul>
<p>Individual bird carcasses can be disposed of by burial or in the trash. There is no evidence people can contract WNV from infected birds, but gloves or a plastic bag are recommended when handling any dead animal. If reporting numbers reach a threshold that indicates a need for further testing, more information and handling protocols will follow.</p>
<p>The Minnesota Nongame Wildlife Program is funded almost entirely through grants and donations. More information about the DNR’s Nongame Wildlife Program and the Loon Monitoring Program can be found on the DNR website at <a href="http://www.mndnr.gov/nongame">mndnr.gov/nongame</a>.</p>
<p>&nbsp;</p>
<p>&nbsp;</p>
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		<title>Herbicide applications to help reforestation efforts in the Remer area</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/07/16/herbicide-applications-to-help-reforestation-efforts-in-the-remer-area/</link>
		<pubDate>Tue, 16 Jul 2019 16:29:26 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[chzeppel]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Forestry]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Grand Rapids]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Region 2-NE]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=22079</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources will begin herbicide applications on select state lands to improve reforestation efforts. Applications will begin around August 15 and continue through approximately September 20 on select parcels in the Remer State Forest in the &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/07/16/herbicide-applications-to-help-reforestation-efforts-in-the-remer-area/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources will begin herbicide applications on select state lands to improve reforestation efforts. Applications will begin around August 15 and continue through approximately September 20 on select parcels in the Remer State Forest in the vicinity of the Pine Tree Hunter Walking Trail.</p>
<p><span id="more-22079"></span>Signs will be posted on all herbicide treatment sites. Adjacent landowners within a quarter mile of the treatment sites have already been notified. Herbicides will not be applied within 100 feet of any waterbody, following DNR herbicide application guidelines.</p>
<p>The DNR plants trees on state lands to reforest harvested areas, provide wildlife habitat, protect watersheds, and maintain healthy forests. Part of the reforestation process involves applying herbicides to the harvested areas prior to or following tree planting.</p>
<p>Herbicides are sprayed on the ground after reforestation to reduce competing woody vegetation.</p>
<p>This gives tree seedlings a better chance to grow and survive. In smaller treatment areas, herbicides are sprayed from the ground.  In large treatment areas, helicopters do aerial spraying using precise GPS-guided mapping. The DNR uses minimal amounts of herbicide only when absolutely necessary. The DNR uses a non-neonicotinoid herbicide that has been proven safe for bees and other pollinators.</p>
<p>This past spring in the DNR’s Deer River work area, the Forestry Division planted more than 14,000 seedlings on 60 acres, and an additional 118 acres were seeded. Statewide, more than 1.9 million seedlings were planted on state forest lands and more than 5,300 acres were seeded this year.</p>
<p>For additional information on sites treated with herbicide in the Deer River work area, contact John Segari at 218-246-8343.</p>
<p>More information about the DNR’s Forestry Division can be found on the DNR website at <a href="http://www.mndnr.gov/forestry">mndnr.gov/forestry</a>.</p>
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		<item>
		<title>DNR hosts second round of area open houses for deer conversation</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/07/15/dnr-hosts-second-round-of-area-open-houses-for-deer-conversation/</link>
		<pubDate>Mon, 15 Jul 2019 16:54:34 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Deer]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fish and Wildlife]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Hunting]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Management]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Wildlife]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=22072</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[Public can meet local wildlife staff and learn about upcoming hunting season changes Local wildlife managers across the state are again inviting the public to come to open house meetings to ask their deer-related questions and offer thoughts on deer &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/07/15/dnr-hosts-second-round-of-area-open-houses-for-deer-conversation/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p><em>Public can meet local wildlife staff and learn about upcoming hunting season changes</em></p>
<p>Local wildlife managers across the state are again inviting the public to come to open house meetings to ask their deer-related questions and offer thoughts on deer issues. <span id="more-22072"></span></p>
<p>The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources is dedicating time from mid-August to early September to discuss deer-related topics including upcoming hunting regulation changes that will be released in early August. Specific time and location details are available on the deer plan webpage at <a href="http://links.govdelivery.com:80/track?type=click&amp;enid=ZWFzPTEmbXNpZD0mYXVpZD0mbWFpbGluZ2lkPTIwMTkwNzE1LjgwNTA2MzEmbWVzc2FnZWlkPU1EQi1QUkQtQlVMLTIwMTkwNzE1LjgwNTA2MzEmZGF0YWJhc2VpZD0xMDAxJnNlcmlhbD0xNjc4MTEyMyZlbWFpbGlkPWp1bGllLmZvcnN0ZXJAc3RhdGUubW4udXMmdXNlcmlkPWp1bGllLmZvcnN0ZXJAc3RhdGUubW4udXMmdGFyZ2V0aWQ9JmZsPSZtdmlkPSZleHRyYT0mJiY=&amp;&amp;&amp;100&amp;&amp;&amp;http://www.mndnr.gov/deerplan?utm_medium=email&amp;utm_source=govdelivery">mndnr.gov/deerplan</a>.</p>
<p>These local, open house meetings are a way to encourage conversations about deer and deer management, enhance local relationships and foster two-way communication between the DNR and the public.</p>
<p>The DNR began the meetings last year with the release of its statewide deer management plan. This is the second dedicated opportunity for conversation about deer-related topics this year; the first meetings were held in March and April.</p>
<p>“After the productive discussions we had in spring, we’re really looking forward to the additional conversation at these open houses,” said Barbara Keller, the DNR’s big game program leader. “These events are great opportunities for people to learn more about specific regulations changes this year and get their questions answered as we approach hunting season. They also provide an opportunity for us to receive public input that will help us plan for the coming year.”</p>
<p>In addition to discussing general concerns about deer, individuals can ask DNR staff about last year’s harvest data, provide topics that the DNR’s deer advisory committee should be aware of, and discuss upcoming hunting season changes. Regulations for the 2019 season will be released in early August and reflect disease management needs, as well as feedback that was gathered from surveys and open house meetings in the spring.</p>
<p>The open houses do not include formal presentations; people can arrive any time during the scheduled meeting times.</p>
<p>The DNR encourages people who can’t attend a scheduled meeting, but who have questions about deer management, to contact a local wildlife manager. A list of area wildlife offices is available online at <a href="http://links.govdelivery.com:80/track?type=click&amp;enid=ZWFzPTEmbXNpZD0mYXVpZD0mbWFpbGluZ2lkPTIwMTkwNzE1LjgwNTA2MzEmbWVzc2FnZWlkPU1EQi1QUkQtQlVMLTIwMTkwNzE1LjgwNTA2MzEmZGF0YWJhc2VpZD0xMDAxJnNlcmlhbD0xNjc4MTEyMyZlbWFpbGlkPWp1bGllLmZvcnN0ZXJAc3RhdGUubW4udXMmdXNlcmlkPWp1bGllLmZvcnN0ZXJAc3RhdGUubW4udXMmdGFyZ2V0aWQ9JmZsPSZtdmlkPSZleHRyYT0mJiY=&amp;&amp;&amp;101&amp;&amp;&amp;http://www.mndnr.gov/areas/wildlife?utm_medium=email&amp;utm_source=govdelivery">mndnr.gov/areas/wildlife</a>.</p>
<p><strong>More about the Minnesota deer management plan </strong><strong><br />
</strong>The DNR released the Minnesota White-Tailed Deer Management Plan in July 2018, setting new goals and priorities, increasing formal opportunities for people to influence deer decisions, and aiming for a disease-free deer population. The plan was a result of two years of planning that involved statewide meetings and hundreds of in-depth conversations with the public and interest groups. The full plan is available on the DNR website at <a href="http://links.govdelivery.com:80/track?type=click&amp;enid=ZWFzPTEmbXNpZD0mYXVpZD0mbWFpbGluZ2lkPTIwMTkwNzE1LjgwNTA2MzEmbWVzc2FnZWlkPU1EQi1QUkQtQlVMLTIwMTkwNzE1LjgwNTA2MzEmZGF0YWJhc2VpZD0xMDAxJnNlcmlhbD0xNjc4MTEyMyZlbWFpbGlkPWp1bGllLmZvcnN0ZXJAc3RhdGUubW4udXMmdXNlcmlkPWp1bGllLmZvcnN0ZXJAc3RhdGUubW4udXMmdGFyZ2V0aWQ9JmZsPSZtdmlkPSZleHRyYT0mJiY=&amp;&amp;&amp;102&amp;&amp;&amp;http://www.mndnr.gov/deerplan?utm_medium=email&amp;utm_source=govdelivery">mndnr.gov/deerplan</a>.</p>
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		<title>Zebra mussels confirmed in Hand Lake in Cass County; Upper Cormorant Lake in Becker County</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/07/11/zebra-mussels-confirmed-in-hand-lake-in-cass-county-upper-cormorant-lake-in-becker-county/</link>
		<pubDate>Thu, 11 Jul 2019 18:09:38 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Aquatic Invasive Species]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=22070</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources has confirmed reports of zebra mussels in Hand Lake in Cass County and Upper Cormorant Lake in Becker County. Two smaller lakes and an unnamed wetland connected to Upper Cormorant Lake will also be &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/07/11/zebra-mussels-confirmed-in-hand-lake-in-cass-county-upper-cormorant-lake-in-becker-county/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources has confirmed reports of zebra mussels in Hand Lake in Cass County and Upper Cormorant Lake in Becker County. Two smaller lakes and an unnamed wetland connected to Upper Cormorant Lake will also be listed for zebra mussels.b<span id="more-22070"></span></p>
<p>A Cass County watercraft inspector found a plant with attached zebra mussels on a boat coming from Hand Lake. Divers then found a 1-inch, adult zebra mussel in Hand Lake. The DNR is conducting further analyses to better determine the distribution of zebra mussels in the lake.</p>
<p>DNR divers conducted a search of Upper Cormorant Lake and found seven adult zebra mussels in four locations. Nelson Lake, Middle Cormorant Lake and an unnamed wetland connected to and downstream of Upper Cormorant Lake will also be listed for zebra mussels. The wetland flows into Big Cormorant Lake, where zebra mussels were confirmed in July of 2015.</p>
<p>Whether or not a lake is listed as infested, Minnesota law requires boaters and anglers to:</p>
<ul>
<li><strong>Clean</strong> watercraft and trailers of aquatic plants and prohibited invasive species.</li>
<li><strong>Drain</strong> all water by removing drain plugs and keeping them out during transport.</li>
<li><strong>Dispose</strong> of unwanted bait in the trash.</li>
</ul>
<p>Some invasive species are small and difficult to see at the water access. To remove or kill them, take one or more of the following precautions before moving to another waterbody:</p>
<ul>
<li>Spray with high-pressure water.</li>
<li>Rinse with very hot water (120 degrees for at least two minutes or 140 degrees for at least 10 seconds).</li>
<li>Dry for at least five days.</li>
</ul>
<p>Zebra mussels can compete with native species for food and habitat, cut the feet of swimmers, reduce the performance of boat motors, and cause expensive damage to water intake pipes.</p>
<p>People should <a href="http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/invasives/ais/contacts.html?utm_content=&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_name=&amp;utm_source=govdelivery&amp;utm_term=">contact an area DNR aquatic invasive species specialist</a> if they think they have found zebra mussels or any other invasive species that has not already been confirmed in a lake.</p>
<p>More information is available at <a href="http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/invasives/aquatic/index.html?utm_medium=email&amp;utm_source=govdelivery">mndnr.gov/ais</a>.</p>
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		<title>Applications open for new career pathway program</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/07/11/applications-open-for-new-career-pathway-program/</link>
		<pubDate>Thu, 11 Jul 2019 15:54:00 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=22067</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[Program aims to increase diversity in environmental, natural resource careers The Department of Natural Resources, the Conservation Corps Minnesota and Iowa, the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency and the Minnesota Board of Water and Soil Resources have partnered to launch the &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/07/11/applications-open-for-new-career-pathway-program/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p><em>Program aims to increase diversity in environmental, natural resource careers</em></p>
<p>The Department of Natural Resources, the Conservation Corps Minnesota and Iowa, the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency and the Minnesota Board of Water and Soil Resources have partnered to launch the Increasing Diversity in Environmental Careers program. <span id="more-22067"></span></p>
<p><img class="alignleft size-medium wp-image-22076" src="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/-10-300x192." alt="" width="300" height="192" srcset="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/-10-300x192. 300w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/-10-75x48. 75w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/-10-768x492. 768w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/-10-600x385. 600w" sizes="(max-width: 300px) 100vw, 300px" />The program is geared toward environmentally-minded college students or soon-to-be college students interested in pursuing a degree in science, technology, engineering, or math. It will consist of three parts – a fellowship with stipends to help address financial need and support academic success, a mentorship to connect students with professionals in the field, and an internship to ensure the students have experience in the field before graduation.</p>
<p>Fifteen students will be accepted as part of the first cohort, and will begin the program at the start of the academic year in the fall.</p>
<p>Applicants must be in pursuit of a STEM major with a desire to work in a natural resources or environmental career after graduation; be accepted to or enrolled in a two- or four-year full-time program at an accredited state, community, private or tribal college or university; be willing to commit to the full program; and be authorized to work in the United States.</p>
<p>Preference will be given to racial or ethnic minorities, women, individuals with disabilities, individuals who face barriers to education and employment, first generation college students, first year college students and individuals demonstrating a strong financial need.</p>
<p>The program is funded by the Minnesota Environmental and Natural Resources Trust Fund.</p>
<p>Application instructions, as well as more information about the program, can be found on the <a href="http://links.govdelivery.com:80/track?type=click&amp;enid=ZWFzPTEmbXNpZD0mYXVpZD0mbWFpbGluZ2lkPTIwMTkwNzExLjc5MjczODEmbWVzc2FnZWlkPU1EQi1QUkQtQlVMLTIwMTkwNzExLjc5MjczODEmZGF0YWJhc2VpZD0xMDAxJnNlcmlhbD0xNjc4MDM4OSZlbWFpbGlkPWp1bGllLmZvcnN0ZXJAc3RhdGUubW4udXMmdXNlcmlkPWp1bGllLmZvcnN0ZXJAc3RhdGUubW4udXMmdGFyZ2V0aWQ9JmZsPSZtdmlkPSZleHRyYT0mJiY=&amp;&amp;&amp;100&amp;&amp;&amp;https://www.conservationcorps.org/?utm_medium=email&amp;utm_source=govdelivery">Conservation Corps Minnesota and Iowa website</a>. Applications are open until the cohort is full.</p>
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		<title>Herbicide applications to help reforestation efforts in the Aitkin area</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/07/10/herbicide-applications-to-help-reforestation-efforts-in-the-aitkin-area/</link>
		<pubDate>Wed, 10 Jul 2019 20:18:16 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[chzeppel]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Aitkin]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Region 2-NE]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[State Forests]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=22061</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources will begin herbicide applications on select state lands to improve reforestation efforts. Applications will begin around July 22 and continue through approximately September 15.  Sites are located in the Hill River, Savanna, and Solana &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/07/10/herbicide-applications-to-help-reforestation-efforts-in-the-aitkin-area/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources will begin herbicide applications on select state lands to improve reforestation efforts. Applications will begin around July 22 and continue through approximately September 15.  Sites are located in the Hill River, Savanna, and Solana State Forests.<span id="more-22061"></span></p>
<p>Signs will be posted on all herbicide treatment sites. Adjacent landowners within a quarter mile of the treatment sites have already been notified. Herbicides will not be applied within 100 feet of any waterbody, following DNR herbicide application guidelines.</p>
<p>The DNR plants trees on state lands to reforest harvested areas, provide wildlife habitat, protect watersheds, and maintain healthy forests. Part of the reforestation process involves applying herbicides to the harvested areas prior to or following tree planting.</p>
<p>Herbicides are sprayed on the ground after reforestation to reduce competing woody vegetation. This gives tree seedlings a better chance to grow and survive.</p>
<p>In smaller treatment areas, herbicides are sprayed from the ground.  In large treatment areas, helicopters do aerial spraying using precise GPS-guided mapping. The DNR uses minimal amounts of herbicide only when absolutely necessary. The DNR uses a non-neonicotinoid herbicide that has been proven safe for bees and other pollinators.</p>
<p>This past spring in the Aitkin area, the Forestry Division planted more than 110,000 seedlings on 175 acres, and an additional 25 acres were seeded. Statewide, more than 1.9 million seedlings were planted on state forest lands and more than 5,300 acres were seeded this year.</p>
<p>For additional information on sites treated with herbicide in the Aitkin area, contact Matt Huseby at 218-697-2476.</p>
<p>More information about the DNR’s Forestry Division can be found on the DNR website at <a href="http://www.mndnr.gov/forestry">mndnr.gov/forestry</a>.</p>
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		<title>Herbicide applications to help reforestation efforts in the Littlefork area</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/07/10/herbicide-applications-to-help-reforestation-efforts-in-the-littlefork-area/</link>
		<pubDate>Wed, 10 Jul 2019 20:07:03 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[chzeppel]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=22059</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources will begin herbicide applications on select state lands to improve reforestation efforts. Applications will begin around July 15 and continue through approximately September 15 on select parcels in the Pine Island, Smokey Bear and &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/07/10/herbicide-applications-to-help-reforestation-efforts-in-the-littlefork-area/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources will begin herbicide applications on select state lands to improve reforestation efforts. Applications will begin around July 15 and continue through approximately September 15 on select parcels in the Pine Island, Smokey Bear and Koochiching state forests.<span id="more-22059"></span></p>
<p>Signs will be posted on all herbicide treatment sites. Adjacent landowners within a quarter mile of the treatment sites have already been notified. Herbicides will not be applied within 100 feet of any waterbody, following DNR herbicide application guidelines.</p>
<p>The DNR plants trees on state lands to reforest harvested areas, provide wildlife habitat, protect watersheds, and maintain healthy forests. Part of the reforestation process involves applying herbicides to the harvested areas prior to or following tree planting.</p>
<p>Herbicides are sprayed on the ground after reforestation to reduce competing woody vegetation. This gives tree seedlings a better chance to grow and survive.</p>
<p>In smaller treatment areas, herbicides are sprayed from the ground.  In large treatment areas, helicopters do aerial spraying using precise GPS-guided mapping. The DNR uses minimal amounts of herbicide only when absolutely necessary. The DNR uses a non-neonicotinoid herbicide that has been proven safe for bees and other pollinators.</p>
<p>This past spring in the Littlefork area, the Forestry Division planted more than 9,000 seedlings on 15 acres, and an additional 2,000 acres were seeded. Statewide, more than 1.9 million seedlings were planted on state forest lands and more than 5,300 acres were seeded this year.</p>
<p>For additional information on sites treated with herbicide in the Littlefork area, contact Lars Helleloid at 218-286-3334.</p>
<p>More information about the DNR’s Forestry Division can be found on the DNR website at <a href="http://www.mndnr.gov/forestry">mndnr.gov/forestry</a>.</p>
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		<title>Herbicide applications to help reforestation efforts in the Cloquet Forestry Area</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/07/10/herbicide-applications-to-help-reforestation-efforts-in-the-cloquet-forestry-area/</link>
		<pubDate>Wed, 10 Jul 2019 19:49:05 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[chzeppel]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Region 2-NE]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[State Forests]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=22057</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources will begin herbicide applications on select state lands to improve reforestation efforts. Applications will begin around July 30 and continue through approximately September 10  on parcels located in the Fond du Lac and Cloquet &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/07/10/herbicide-applications-to-help-reforestation-efforts-in-the-cloquet-forestry-area/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources will begin herbicide applications on select state lands to improve reforestation efforts. Applications will begin around July 30 and continue through approximately September 10<sup>  </sup>on parcels located in the Fond du Lac and Cloquet Valley state forests.<span id="more-22057"></span></p>
<p>Signs will be posted on all herbicide treatment sites. Adjacent landowners within a quarter mile of the treatment sites have already been notified. Herbicides will not be applied within 100 feet of any waterbody, following DNR herbicide application guidelines.</p>
<p>The DNR plants trees on state lands to reforest harvested areas, provide wildlife habitat, protect watersheds, and maintain healthy forests. Part of the reforestation process involves applying herbicides to the harvested areas prior to or following tree planting.</p>
<p>Herbicides are sprayed on the ground after reforestation to reduce competing woody vegetation. This gives tree seedlings a better chance to grow and survive. In smaller treatment areas, herbicides are sprayed from the ground.  In large treatment areas, helicopters do aerial spraying using precise GPS-guided mapping. The DNR uses minimal amounts of herbicide only when absolutely necessary. The DNR uses a non-neonicotinoid herbicide that has been proven safe for bees and other pollinators.</p>
<p>This past spring in the Cloquet Forestry Area, the Forestry Division planted more than 285,000 seedlings on 300 acres. Statewide, more than 1.9 million seedlings were planted on state forest lands and more than 5,300 acres were seeded this year.</p>
<p>For additional information on sites treated with herbicide in the Cloquet Forestry Area, contact Robert Slater at 218-723-4791 ext. 222.</p>
<p>More information about the DNR’s Forestry Division can be found on the DNR website at <a href="http://www.mndnr.gov/forestry">mndnr.gov/forestry</a>.</p>
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		<title>Herbicide applications to help reforestation efforts in the Hibbing area</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/07/09/herbicide-applications-to-help-reforestation-efforts-in-the-hibbing-area-2/</link>
		<pubDate>Tue, 09 Jul 2019 20:00:41 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[chzeppel]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Forestry]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Region 2-NE]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[State Forests]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=22051</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources will begin herbicide applications on select state lands to improve reforestation efforts. Applications will begin around July 15 and continue through approximately Sept. 10 on 110 acres in the Hibbing area. Signs will be &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/07/09/herbicide-applications-to-help-reforestation-efforts-in-the-hibbing-area-2/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources will begin herbicide applications on select state lands to improve reforestation efforts. Applications will begin around July 15 and continue through approximately Sept. 10 on 110 acres in the Hibbing area.<span id="more-22051"></span></p>
<p>Signs will be posted on all herbicide treatment sites. Adjacent landowners within a quarter mile of the treatment sites have already been notified. Herbicides will not be applied within 100 feet of any waterbody, following DNR herbicide application guidelines.</p>
<p>The DNR plants trees on state lands to reforest harvested areas, provide wildlife habitat, protect watersheds, and maintain healthy forests. Part of the reforestation process involves applying herbicides to the harvested areas prior to or following tree planting.</p>
<p>Herbicides are sprayed on the ground after reforestation to reduce competing woody vegetation.</p>
<p>This gives tree seedlings a better chance to grow and survive. In smaller treatment areas, herbicides are sprayed from the ground.  In large treatment areas, helicopters do aerial spraying using precise GPS-guided mapping. The DNR uses minimal amounts of herbicide only when absolutely necessary. The DNR uses a non-neonicotinoid herbicide that has been proven safe for bees and other pollinators.</p>
<p>This past spring in the Hibbing area, the Forestry Division planted more than 150,000 seedlings on 150 acres, and an additional 300 acres were seeded. Statewide, more than 1.9 million seedlings were planted on state forest lands and more than 5,300 acres were seeded this year.</p>
<p>For additional information on sites treated with herbicide in the Hibbing area, contact Jon Splinter at 218-231-8028.</p>
<p>More information about the DNR’s Forestry Division can be found on the DNR website at <a href="http://www.mndnr.gov/forestry">mndnr.gov/forestry</a>.</p>
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		<title>Herbicide applications to help reforestation efforts in the Tower area</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/07/09/herbicide-applications-to-help-reforestation-efforts-in-the-tower-area-2/</link>
		<pubDate>Tue, 09 Jul 2019 19:27:18 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[chzeppel]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Forestry]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Region 2-NE]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Tower]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=22049</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources will begin herbicide applications on select state lands to improve reforestation efforts. Applications will begin around July 15 and continue through approximately Sept. 15 on selected sites in the Kabetogama and Bear Island State &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/07/09/herbicide-applications-to-help-reforestation-efforts-in-the-tower-area-2/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources will begin herbicide applications on select state lands to improve reforestation efforts. Applications will begin around July 15 and continue through approximately Sept. 15 on selected sites in the Kabetogama and Bear Island State Forests. <span id="more-22049"></span></p>
<p>Signs will be posted on all herbicide treatment sites. Adjacent landowners within a quarter mile of the treatment sites have already been notified. Herbicides will not be applied within 100 feet of any waterbody, following DNR herbicide application guidelines.</p>
<p>The DNR plants trees on state lands to reforest harvested areas, provide wildlife habitat, protect watersheds, and maintain healthy forests. Part of the reforestation process involves applying herbicides to the harvested areas prior to or following tree planting.</p>
<p>Herbicides are sprayed on the ground after reforestation to reduce competing woody vegetation.</p>
<p>This gives tree seedlings a better chance to grow and survive. In smaller treatment areas, herbicides are sprayed by people using backpack sprayers.  In large treatment areas, helicopters do aerial spraying using precise GPS-guided mapping. The DNR uses minimal amounts of herbicide only when absolutely necessary. The DNR uses a non-neonicotinoid herbicide that has been proven safe for bees and other pollinators.</p>
<p>This past spring in the Tower area, the Forestry Division planted more than 155,000 seedlings on 210 acres, and an additional 550 acres were seeded. Statewide, more than 1.9 million seedlings were planted on state forest lands and more than 5,300 acres were seeded this year.</p>
<p>For additional information on sites treated with herbicide in the Tower area, contact area forester, Dave Sopoci at 218-757-3274, ext. 223.</p>
<p>More information about the DNR’s Forestry Division can be found on the DNR website at <a href="http://www.mndnr.gov/forestry">mndnr.gov/forestry</a>.</p>
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		<title>DNR officials offer condolences on loss of Red Lake Nation Conservation Officer Shannon Barron</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/07/09/dnr-officials-offer-condolences-on-loss-of-red-lake-nation-conservation-officer-shannon-barron/</link>
		<pubDate>Tue, 09 Jul 2019 18:57:31 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[stcarrol]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Enforcement]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=22046</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[Red Lake Nation Conservation Officer Shannon Barron passed away in the line of duty Sunday, July 7, after suffering a medical emergency while responding to a call for service. Barron had been a Red Lake Nation conservation officer since 2000. &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/07/09/dnr-officials-offer-condolences-on-loss-of-red-lake-nation-conservation-officer-shannon-barron/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Red Lake Nation Conservation Officer Shannon Barron passed away in the line of duty Sunday, July 7, after suffering a medical emergency while responding to a call for service. Barron had been a Red Lake Nation conservation officer since 2000.<span id="more-22046"></span></p>
<p>Following are statements from DNR Commissioner Sarah Strommen and Enforcement Division Director Col. Rodmen Smith:</p>
<p>DNR Commissioner Sarah Strommen: “Our thoughts and prayers are with the family, colleagues and friends of Red Lake Nation Conservation Officer Shannon Barron and the Red Lake Nation as a whole. The state of Minnesota and the Red Lake Nation share a common mission when it comes to the protection of natural resources, and Officer Barron’s legacy of upholding that mission will never be forgotten.”</p>
<p>DNR Enforcement Division Director Col. Rodmen Smith: “Conservation Officer Shannon Barron proudly served the Red Lake Nation for 19 years, working tirelessly to protect not just its natural resources, but also its people. Officer Barron made the ultimate sacrifice in service to the Red Lake Nation’s people and resources, and today all of his partners in law enforcement salute his service and mourn his passing.”</p>
<p>&nbsp;</p>
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		<title>Itasca State Park to dedicate new amphitheater</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/07/08/itasca-state-park-to-dedicate-new-amphitheater/</link>
		<pubDate>Mon, 08 Jul 2019 19:56:07 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[State Parks]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=22042</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources and the Friends of Itasca will host a dedication event on Saturday, July 27, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., for the new Lake Itasca Amphitheater at Itasca State Park.  The dedication will take place &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/07/08/itasca-state-park-to-dedicate-new-amphitheater/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources and the Friends of Itasca will host a dedication event on Saturday, July 27, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., for the new Lake Itasca Amphitheater at Itasca State Park. <span id="more-22042"></span></p>
<p><img class="alignleft size-medium wp-image-22043" src="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/-7-300x200." alt="Itasca State Park amphitheater" width="300" height="200" srcset="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/-7-300x200. 300w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/-7-75x50. 75w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/-7-768x512. 768w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/-7-600x400. 600w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/-7 1000w" sizes="(max-width: 300px) 100vw, 300px" />The dedication will take place at the amphitheater. Visitors should bring a blanket or lawn chair and come prepared for a day of music, a visit from Courier-de-Bois, who will take visitors back in time to explore the life of a voyageur, and an ice cream social.</p>
<p>Erika Rivers, DNR Parks and Trails Division director, will dedicate the amphitheater and speak about its value and funding.</p>
<p>The new amphitheater is located in the picnic grounds adjacent to the swim beach and playground. It is situated along the shore of Lake Itasca and seats more than 300 people with its bench seating and open grassy areas for lawn chairs and blankets. The shape of the amphitheater, along with the sloping landscape, provide outstanding acoustics for any event. It offers lighting for night programs and a directional sound system.</p>
<p>“Thanks to Legacy Amendment funding and the hard work of DNR staff, architects and engineers, we now have an amazing outdoor venue for music, entertainment and events,” Rivers said. “The setting for the amphitheater is breathtaking. Every seat offers a view of Lake Itasca and a cool breeze to go with it. What better place to be entertained and enjoy the outdoors?”</p>
<p>Schedule:</p>
<ul>
<li><strong>11 a.m. &#8211; 1 p.m. (or while ice cream lasts) Ice Cream Social.</strong> Enjoy a sweet treat and music concert at the ice cream social. The Friends of Itasca will be making chocolate or strawberry sundaes with proceeds going toward projects in Itasca State Park. Fee.</li>
<li><strong>11 a.m. &#8211; 2 p.m. Nature stations.</strong> Discover information and activity stations about Itasca’s natural and cultural history.</li>
<li><strong>11 &#8211; 11:45 a.m. The music of Bill &amp; Julie Kaiser</strong>—From the north woods of Minnesota, Bill and Julie’s music has been described as acoustic “folkgrass” with a mix of bluegrass, folk and original.</li>
<li><strong>12 &#8211; 12:15 p.m.  Dedication of the amphitheater. </strong>Erika Rivers, DNR Parks and Trails Division director, will talk about the value of the amphitheater and its funding, and thank those who worked to make it a reality.</li>
<li><strong>12:15 &#8211; 1 p.m.: The Voyageur.</strong> Travel back in time with a visit from a Courier-de-Bois (ranger of the woods) and learn the life of a voyageur. Discover how it might have been living many years ago by river and paddle.</li>
<li><strong>1:15 &#8211; 2 p.m. The music of Unpolished.</strong> The musical group “Unpolished” performs an eclectic mix of roots, Americana and bluegrass music on bass, guitar, mandolin and banjo, complete with rich three-part harmonies. The group covers many styles of folk music including music from the 1800s &#8211; Civil War, old cowboy music, railroad songs, bluegrass music and traditional gospel music.</li>
</ul>
<p>Funding for the amphitheater is from the Parks and Trails Legacy fund, created after voters approved the Clean Water, Land and Legacy Amendment in November 2008. The Parks and Trails Fund receives 14.25 percent of the three-eighths percent sales tax revenue that may only be spent to support parks and trails of regional or statewide significance.</p>
<p>Beginning in 2020, the amphitheater will be available to rent hourly. For more information on the amphitheater or Itasca State Park, visit <a href="https://gcc01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.mndnr.gov%2Fstate_parks%2Fitasca%2F%3Futm_medium%3Demail%26utm_source%3Dgovdelivery&amp;data=02%7C01%7CJulie.Forster%40state.mn.us%7C8ae858f859544798c6e508d703c8b0fa%7Ceb14b04624c445198f26b89c2159828c%7C0%7C0%7C636982032808497541&amp;sdata=uQWPKffoWiCIu1Yfgk%2Bo%2FVSA0f8FRrUtcGQsCsIEQAw%3D&amp;reserved=0">mndnr.gov/state_parks/itasca/</a>.</p>
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		<title>New self-registration stations at Cuyuna Country SRA add convenience</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/07/08/new-self-registration-stations-at-cuyuna-country-sra-add-convenience/</link>
		<pubDate>Mon, 08 Jul 2019 19:51:01 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[State Parks]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=22039</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[Visitors to Cuyuna Country State Recreation Area in Ironton now have more convenient options to buy their state park vehicle permits. Five new self-registration stations have been installed throughout the complex.  New stations are now available at: the parking lot &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/07/08/new-self-registration-stations-at-cuyuna-country-sra-add-convenience/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Visitors to Cuyuna Country State Recreation Area in Ironton now have more convenient options to buy their state park vehicle permits. Five new self-registration stations have been installed throughout the complex. <span id="more-22039"></span></p>
<p><img class="alignleft size-medium wp-image-22040" src="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/-6-300x225." alt="" width="300" height="225" srcset="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/-6-300x225. 300w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/-6-75x56. 75w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/-6-768x576. 768w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/-6-600x450. 600w" sizes="(max-width: 300px) 100vw, 300px" />New stations are now available at:</p>
<ul>
<li>the parking lot at the end of Yawkey Road.</li>
<li>the entrance to the Rally Center on North Road.</li>
<li>Portsmouth Mine Lake public water access off County Road 30.</li>
<li>County Road 128 trailhead.</li>
<li>Sagamore Mine Lake public water access.</li>
</ul>
<p>These are in addition to the existing self-registration station at the Portsmouth Campground.</p>
<p>Using the self-registration station is easy and fast. Visitors should follow the instructions on the envelope. They should put cash, check, or credit card information for the correct amount in the envelope, and deposit it into the payment slot. The &#8220;user copy&#8221; section of the form should be placed on the dash of the vehicle as proof of compliance.</p>
<p>Daily permits are $7 and year-round permits are $35. The Cuyuna Country State Recreation Area is part of the Minnesota state park system and permits are required on all vehicles entering the recreation area. A year-round permit buys access to all 75 Minnesota state parks and recreation areas for one year from the date of purchase.</p>
<p>Park permits can also be purchased online, in person at individual park offices when staffed, and at the Minnesota DNR License Center at 500 Lafayette Road, St Paul. More information about state park permits, discounts for military and disabled individuals, and the state park license plate can be found at <a href="https://www.dnr.state.mn.us/state_parks/permit.html?utm_medium=email&amp;utm_source=govdelivery">mndnr.gov/state_parks/permit</a>.</p>
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		<title>DNR announces hiring of new directors for Fish and Wildlife and Lands and Minerals divisions</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/07/02/dnr-announces-hiring-of-new-directors-for-fish-and-wildlife-and-lands-and-minerals-divisions/</link>
		<pubDate>Tue, 02 Jul 2019 19:24:56 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
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		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=22035</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources has hired two veteran state government leaders to head the agency’s Fish and Wildlife and Lands and Minerals divisions.  Dave Olfelt, the DNR’s regional wildlife manager for northeastern Minnesota, has been named the Fish &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/07/02/dnr-announces-hiring-of-new-directors-for-fish-and-wildlife-and-lands-and-minerals-divisions/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources has hired two veteran state government leaders to head the agency’s Fish and Wildlife and Lands and Minerals divisions. <span id="more-22035"></span></p>
<p>Dave Olfelt, the DNR’s regional wildlife manager for northeastern Minnesota, has been named the Fish and Wildlife Division director. Joe Henderson, currently the assistant director for the Lands and Minerals Division overseeing permitting and other regulatory operations, has been named the Lands and Minerals Division director.</p>
<p>“I’m thrilled that Dave and Joe have agreed to take director positions in these two, high-profile DNR divisions,” said DNR Commissioner Sarah Strommen. “They bring tremendous experience and passion for their specific disciplines, and for engaging with our stakeholders.”</p>
<p>As the DNR Fish and Wildlife Division director, Olfelt will oversee a biennial budget of more than $200 million and a staff of 600 employees. The division ensures that people from all walks of life can enjoy quality fishing and the aquatic habitats on Minnesota&#8217;s 4,500 managed lakes and 16,000 miles of fishable rivers and streams; and that they can discover, explore, hunt and enjoy Minnesota&#8217;s diverse wildlife and the forests, prairies, woods and wetlands on 5.6 million acres of DNR-administered lands.</p>
<p>The division manages cold and warm water hatcheries; conducts research to ensure that good science informs DNR fish and wildlife management decisions every day; and provides interdisciplinary conservation and environmental education programming.</p>
<p>Olfelt has served in various positions in wildlife, and parks and trails at the DNR since 1987. He worked as an assistant area wildlife manager in the south metropolitan area of the Twin Cities from 1988 to 1991, managing and restoring prairie and wetland habitats. He worked as a biologist for what was then the agency’s Parks and Recreation Division from 1991 to 2005, and later became assistant regional wildlife manager in Grand Rapids for the northeast region until 2010. He moved to the newly created Parks and Trails Division, serving as assistant regional manager for the northeast until 2015, when he became regional wildlife manager.</p>
<p>As regional wildlife manager, Olfelt has been responsible for wildlife programs in a region that roughly includes the northeastern quarter of Minnesota, extending north to the Canadian border and east to Lake Superior. In his more than 30-year career at the DNR, Olfelt has developed deep connections with recreation and wildlife stakeholders throughout Minnesota.</p>
<p>Henderson has spent 28 years working in various capacities at the DNR and the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA). As Lands and Minerals Division director, Henderson will be responsible for providing real estate services for the management of state lands, overseeing the exploration and use of state-owned minerals, and providing regulatory oversight of ferrous and non-ferrous mining operations.</p>
<p>The division has a $13 million annual budget and 100 employees.</p>
<p>Prior to joining the DNR in 2013, Henderson spent approximately two years as the state mining coordinator, and worked to further develop collaborative relationships among state agencies on mining regulatory topics. Henderson served more than 20 years with the MPCA in a variety of leadership capacities focused primarily in the areas of enforcement, permitting, and environmental review.</p>
<p>In his time at the DNR, Henderson led the development of innovative approaches to improve government transparency, increase tribal engagement, and utilize technology to share information and facilitate public input.</p>
<p>Olfelt begins his Fish and Wildlife job on July 15. Henderson begins his job on July 8.</p>
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		<title>Intoxicated boaters are target of increased patrols during holiday week</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/07/02/intoxicated-boaters-are-target-of-increased-patrols-during-holiday-week/</link>
		<pubDate>Tue, 02 Jul 2019 17:06:04 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
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		<category><![CDATA[Water Safety]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=22031</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[Law enforcement working to keep waterways safe as part of Operation Dry Water In Minnesota and across the nation, BWI is the leading contributing factor in boating accidents and fatalities. In the past two years, half of the fatal boating &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/07/02/intoxicated-boaters-are-target-of-increased-patrols-during-holiday-week/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p><em>Law enforcement working to keep waterways safe as part of Operation Dry Water</em></p>
<p>In Minnesota and across the nation, BWI is the leading contributing factor in boating accidents and fatalities. In the past two years, half of the fatal boating incidents in Minnesota involved alcohol, which is higher than the five-year average. Operation Dry Water coincides with the busy Fourth of July holiday weekend, when BWI-related injuries and deaths tend to spike. <span id="more-22031"></span></p>
<p><img class="alignleft size-medium wp-image-22033" src="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/-5-300x225." alt="" width="300" height="225" srcset="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/-5-300x225. 300w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/-5-75x56. 75w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/-5-768x576. 768w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/-5-600x450. 600w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/-5 960w" sizes="(max-width: 300px) 100vw, 300px" />“We have zero tolerance for boaters who endanger the lives of other boaters – or their own lives – by choosing to operate while under the influence,” said Lt. Adam Block, DNR Enforcement boating law administrator. “The penalties for doing so have never been higher, but they pale in comparison to losing your life or ending someone else’s life because of a choice you made.”</p>
<p>Minnesota’s BWI laws are among the strongest in the country, and new aspects of the law mean people convicted of drinking and driving – whether they’re driving a boat, motor vehicle or recreational vehicle – lose their privilege to operate any of them.</p>
<p>While failure to wear a life jacket is the reason the majority of fatal boating accidents turn deadly, being intoxicated often is what causes people to end up in the water in the first place. The legal blood alcohol limit for boaters is .08, but public safety officials encourage boaters to leave alcohol on shore and boat sober on “dry water.”</p>
<p>“If you plan to partake while you’re on the water, make sure you’ve lined up a sober ride – both on the boat and in the car on the way home,” Block said. “A little planning ahead can prevent a mountain of heartache in the future.”</p>
<p>For more information on Operation Dry Water and boating safety, visit <a href="http://www.operationdrywater.org">operationdrywater.org</a> and <a href="http://www.mndnr.gov/boatingsafety">mndnr.gov/boatingsafety</a></p>
<p>Operation Dry Water activities are sponsored by the National Association of Boating Law Administrators in partnership with the U.S. Coast Guard.</p>
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		<title>Public invited to help remove invasive plants at Iron Horse Prairie Scientific and Natural Area</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/07/02/public-invited-to-help-remove-invasive-plants-at-iron-horse-prairie-scientific-and-natural-area/</link>
		<pubDate>Tue, 02 Jul 2019 13:59:00 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
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		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=22026</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[July 13 event to target removal of wild parsnip The public can help remove invasive plants from Iron Horse Prairie Scientific and Natural Area, according to the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.  Wild parsnip is an invasive weed that is &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/07/02/public-invited-to-help-remove-invasive-plants-at-iron-horse-prairie-scientific-and-natural-area/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p><em>July 13 event to target removal of wild parsnip</em></p>
<p>The public can help remove invasive plants from Iron Horse Prairie Scientific and Natural Area, according to the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. <span id="more-22026"></span></p>
<p>Wild parsnip is an invasive weed that is seen widely throughout southeastern Minnesota, choking out roadsides and native prairies. Volunteers are asked to help bag as much wild parsnip as possible in order to prevent it from spreading its seed and further invading the site.</p>
<p>“Iron Horse Prairie SNA is perhaps the finest and largest example of mesic tallgrass prairie remaining in this part of the state,” said SNA specialist Brad Bolduan. “Invasive plants like wild parsnip can quickly outcompete native plants, so we hope the public helps us protect this vital remnant prairie.”</p>
<p>Wild parsnip is native to Europe and Asia. It is present in most Minnesota counties, but is most abundant in southeast Minnesota. The plant has toxic sap that can cause severe skin rash and blistering in the presence of sunlight. As a result, this removal event is limited to adults. Registration is encouraged.</p>
<p>The volunteer event starts at 9:30 a.m. on Saturday, July 13 and is expected to take about three hours.</p>
<p>Long pants and long sleeves along with appropriate footwear are required. Tools and gloves will be provided. Participants are also encouraged to plan ahead since there is no shelter, drinking water or restroom at the SNA.</p>
<p>Volunteers can register by contacting Kari Wallin at 651-259-5165 or <a href="mailto:Kari.Wallin@state.mn.us">Kari.Wallin@state.mn.us</a>.</p>
<p>The DNR benefits greatly from its volunteers. <a href="https://files.dnr.state.mn.us/volunteering/annualreport.pdf">In 2018</a>, more than 20,000 volunteers donated nearly 284,000 hours, which is valued at $7.8 million.</p>
<p><a href="https://www.dnr.state.mn.us/snas/detail.html?id=sna01018">Iron Horse Prairie SNA</a> is a triangular-shaped parcel situated between two diverging railroad spurs. Those railroads, which are now abandoned, helped create a site that was protected from cultivation or other disturbance. The 35-acre site is the area’s largest example of tallgrass prairie. Species diversity is very high on this site and contains a number of rare plant species.</p>
<p><u>Directions to Iron Horse Prairie SNA:</u></p>
<p>From Hayfield, drive south on MN Highway 56 for 1 mile. Turn east on 740<sup>th</sup> St (County Road N) for 0.5 miles. Park in the lot on the south side of the road at the old railroad grade.</p>
<p>Many additional DNR volunteer and recreational events are scheduled throughout the summer. The full <a href="https://www.dnr.state.mn.us/events/index.html">schedule of DNR events</a> is available on the DNR website, <a href="http://mndnr.gov">mndnr.gov</a>.</p>
<p>Funding for wild parsnip removal event at the Iron Horse Prairie SNA was provided by the Minnesota Environment and Natural Resources Trust Fund as recommended by the <a href="https://www.lccmr.leg.mn/">Legislative-Citizen Commission on Minnesota Resources</a>. The trust fund is a permanent fund constitutionally established by Minnesotans to assist in the protection, conservation, preservation and enhancement of the state’s air, water, land, fish, wildlife and other natural resources.</p>
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		<title>Whitewater State Park centennial includes special concert</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/07/01/whitewater-state-park-centennial-includes-special-concert/</link>
		<pubDate>Mon, 01 Jul 2019 18:28:37 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
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		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=22023</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[A century ago in 1919, Congress established the Grand Canyon as a national park, while closer to home, the Minnesota Legislature appropriated $10,000 for the purchase of 240 acres in Winona County to be preserved as a state park.  Today, &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/07/01/whitewater-state-park-centennial-includes-special-concert/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>A century ago in 1919, Congress established the Grand Canyon as a national park, while closer to home, the Minnesota Legislature appropriated $10,000 for the purchase of 240 acres in Winona County to be preserved as a state park. <span id="more-22023"></span></p>
<p><img class="alignleft size-medium wp-image-22024" src="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/-4-300x225." alt="" width="300" height="225" srcset="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/-4-300x225. 300w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/-4-75x56. 75w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/-4-768x576. 768w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/-4-600x450. 600w" sizes="(max-width: 300px) 100vw, 300px" />Today, Whitewater State Park encompasses 2,700 acres of wooded ravines and limestone bluffs rising above its namesake river teeming with trout.</p>
<p>To celebrate the 100<sup>th</sup> birthday of one of the state’s most popular and picturesque parks, staff with the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources have been highlighting Whitewater’s history with special programs that will culminate on Saturday, July 13, with a centennial picnic and a sing along featuring the Grammy Award winning Okee Dokee Brothers. The concert, running from noon to 2 p.m., is free and no park entrance fees will be charged for the day.</p>
<p>“Bring a picnic lunch, a blanket and some chairs; we’ll provide the cake and punch,” said Whitewater State Park interpretive naturalist Sara Holger. “We’ll listen to some downhome music from the Okee Dokee Brothers, and then all join together to sing Happy Birthday to the park.”</p>
<p>Located about a half-hour east of Rochester, Whitewater State Park sees some 250,000 visitors each year, with about 50,000 staying overnight at one of the park’s 154 campsites or five camper cabins. Visitors can enjoy fishing for trout, a sandy swimming beach, a year-round visitor center, and hiking trails that range from easy to challenging. In winter, the park is popular for cross-country skiing and snowshoeing.</p>
<p>Nearly 50 kinds of mammals and 250 species of birds use the Whitewater River Valley during the course of a year, including the ever-present bald eagles and wild turkeys.</p>
<p>For more information, visit <a href="https://gcc01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.mndnr.gov%2Fwhitewater%3Futm_medium%3Demail%26utm_source%3Dgovdelivery&amp;data=02%7C01%7CJulie.Forster%40state.mn.us%7C397cc96e391a463e2a9408d6fe43181b%7Ceb14b04624c445198f26b89c2159828c%7C0%7C0%7C636975961470558163&amp;sdata=bhLWFuz3WYnP3kjg3wGwPfO%2Bd6MI08GkK8dVDEV6eFM%3D&amp;reserved=0">mndnr.gov/whitewater</a>.</p>
<p><strong>A brief history of Whitewater State Park</strong><br />
<em>100 Years in Paradise</em></p>
<p>Twenty five miles east of Rochester, Minnesota State Highway 74 quickly descends from gently rolling farm fields through ancient outcrops of limestone into the beauty of Whitewater State Park. Since it was established in 1919, the park has been praised for its outstanding cold water trout fishery, noticeable lack of mosquitoes and dramatic landscapes. And 2019 marks the Centennial Anniversary of this special place.</p>
<p>Over the past year, park staff have been working with the Friends of Whitewater to plan monthly centennial events that showcase the fascinating history of and unique outdoor opportunities at Whitewater State Park. The following timeline highlights some of that history.</p>
<ul>
<li><strong>1896 – 1918</strong>  Tourists flocked to the Whitewater valley to camp, hike, fish and hunt at the Paradise Ranch, a private ranch offering visitors opportunities to experience the outdoors.</li>
<li><strong>1916 &#8211; 1919</strong>  When farming and land-use concerns motivated locals to unite to preserve the Whitewater valley, L.A. Warming, the editor of the local newspaper, assembled a photo book of the valley titled, &#8220;<em>The Paradise of Minnesota; the Proposed Whitewater State Park</em>. &#8221; The book helped grow support for establishing the park and, on April 24, 1919, the House Appropriations Committee approved $10,000 for &#8220;the new Whitewater State Park in Winona County to cover the costs of 240 acres of land.&#8221;</li>
<li><strong>1934 &#8211; 1941</strong>  The park was fairly rustic until the New Deal programs of the Great Depression funded development projects, with labor provided by the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) and the Works Progress Administration (WPA). Using simple hand tools, these workers built much of the infrastructure still used by park visitors today including the beach, picnic areas, restroom facilities, parking lots and many of the trails.</li>
<li><strong>1944 &#8211; 1945</strong>  The camp facilities that housed CCC and WPA workers were used as a German Prisoner of War (POW) camp at the end of World War II.  At that time, America had a labor shortage and POWs were assigned across the country to help with agricultural work and other manual labor. The Whitewater camp was later used as a summer camp for various youth organizations until 1953, when a tornado demolished the site.</li>
<li><strong>1940s – 1960s</strong>  Boy Scout camporees were held at the park each May.  Troops from across southeastern Minnesota gathered with 600 – 1,000 boys camping in military-style pup tents in the woods and pastures surrounding the edges of the developed park.</li>
<li><strong>1970s – 2000s</strong>  Repeated flooding caused the park to lose its golf course, stone-arch bridge and CCC visitor cabins. Floods washed away and buried campgrounds, forcing park staff to rebuild in new locations out of the floodplain. In 2007, the largest flood in the park’s history caused several million dollars in damage to infrastructure and closed the park for nearly a year.</li>
<li><strong>2009</strong>  Peregrine falcons returned to Whitewater State Park after a nearly 40-year absence due to widespread use of the pesticide DDT.</li>
<li><strong>2014</strong>  The Friends of Whitewater regrouped after dissolving in the 1990s. Today this newly invigorated group of park volunteers works tirelessly to raise funds for park projects and events and to help park management staff find innovative and creative ways to achieve goals and objectives identified in the park management plan.</li>
<li><strong>2019</strong>  Whitewater State Park is celebrating 100 years with a variety of monthly special events including a Centennial Picnic and Great Big Sing Along with the Okee Dokee Brothers on Saturday, July 13, from noon – 2 p.m.</li>
</ul>
<p>The affection that past and present visitors have for the Whitewater valley is expressed in the following poem, whose author is unknown;</p>
<p>&#8220;<em>Oh there&#8217;s not in this wide world a valley so sweet</em><em><br />
as the valley in whose bosom the Whitewaters meet</em>.”</p>
<p>For more details about Whitewater State Park and its centennial, including an online version of the revised <em>Paradise of Minnesota</em> book, visit: <a href="https://gcc01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.mndnr.gov%2Fwhitewater%3Futm_medium%3Demail%26utm_source%3Dgovdelivery&amp;data=02%7C01%7CJulie.Forster%40state.mn.us%7C397cc96e391a463e2a9408d6fe43181b%7Ceb14b04624c445198f26b89c2159828c%7C0%7C0%7C636975961470558163&amp;sdata=bhLWFuz3WYnP3kjg3wGwPfO%2Bd6MI08GkK8dVDEV6eFM%3D&amp;reserved=0">mndnr.gov/whitewater</a>.</p>
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		<title>Avoid hitting loons during holiday boating and throughout season</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/07/01/avoid-hitting-loons-during-holiday-boating-and-throughout-season/</link>
		<pubDate>Mon, 01 Jul 2019 18:25:20 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
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		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=22020</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources is reminding boaters to watch for loons not only around the Fourth of July holiday, but also as part of their season-long safety procedures.  Watercraft are a significant cause of loon mortality. Loons frequently &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/07/01/avoid-hitting-loons-during-holiday-boating-and-throughout-season/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources is reminding boaters to watch for loons not only around the Fourth of July holiday, but also as part of their season-long safety procedures. <span id="more-22020"></span></p>
<p><img class="alignleft size-medium wp-image-22021" src="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/-3-300x198." alt="" width="300" height="198" srcset="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/-3 300w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/-3-75x50. 75w" sizes="(max-width: 300px) 100vw, 300px" />Watercraft are a significant cause of loon mortality. Loons frequently nest and rear their young in areas where boats move at higher speeds.</p>
<p>Loon chicks are not able to fly until they are more than two months old; they’re also unable to dive for safety as mature loons and other birds can.</p>
<p>Mature loons are heavy birds, enabling them to dive as deep as 250 feet to search for food. They can stay underwater for up to five minutes.</p>
<p>Loons in Minnesota range throughout the busiest boating areas of the state, inhabiting lakes across almost all of northern, central and eastern Minnesota.</p>
<p>Other facts about loons:</p>
<ul>
<li>Minnesota has more loons (roughly 12,000) than any other state except Alaska.</li>
<li>Loons can fly more than 75 miles per hour.</li>
<li>The red in the loon&#8217;s eye helps it to see under water.</li>
<li>Scientists think loons can live for 30 years or more.</li>
</ul>
<p>In addition to fast-moving boats, threats to loons include human disturbance and pollutants such as lead and mercury. The DNR monitors loon populations with the help of volunteers to improve understanding of what our state bird needs to maintain a strong, healthy presence here.</p>
<p>More information about the common loon is available at <a href="https://www.dnr.state.mn.us/birds/commonloon.html?utm_medium=email&amp;utm_source=govdelivery">mndnr.gov/birds/commonloon.html</a>.</p>
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