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	<title>MN Department of Natural Resources &#8212; News Releases</title>
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	<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us</link>
	<description>MN Department of Natural Resources -- News Releases</description>
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		<title>Zebra mussel larvae confirmed in Garfield Lake in Hubbard County</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2017/09/21/zebra-mussel-larvae-confirmed-in-garfield-lake-in-hubbard-county/</link>
		<pubDate>Thu, 21 Sep 2017 17:52:22 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[stcarrol]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Aquatic Invasive Species]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=19962</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[An independent laboratory has confirmed zebra mussel larvae in Garfield Lake in Hubbard County. The lab provided photos of two zebra mussel larvae, called veligers, found in a water sample taken from the lake. Property owners on Garfield Lake hired &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2017/09/21/zebra-mussel-larvae-confirmed-in-garfield-lake-in-hubbard-county/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>An independent laboratory has confirmed zebra mussel larvae in Garfield Lake in Hubbard County.</p>
<p>The lab provided photos of two zebra mussel larvae, called veligers, found in a water sample taken from the lake. Property owners on Garfield Lake hired the lab as part of their own monitoring. Invasive species specialists from the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources found no zebra mussels in the lake during a six-hour dive survey.<span id="more-19962"></span></p>
<p>Garfield Lake will be added to the Infested Waters List for zebra mussels, with the provision that it may be removed from the list if future surveys continue to show no zebra mussels in the lake.</p>
<p>Whether or not a lake is listed as infested, Minnesota law requires boaters and anglers to:</p>
<ul>
<li><strong>Clean</strong> watercraft of aquatic plants and prohibited invasive species,</li>
</ul>
<ul>
<li><strong>Drain</strong> all water by removing drain plugs and keeping them out during transport, and</li>
<li><strong>Dispose</strong> of unwanted bait in the trash.</li>
</ul>
<p>Some invasive species are small and difficult to see at the access. To remove or kill them, take one or more of the following precautions before moving to another waterbody, especially after leaving infested waters:</p>
<ul>
<li>Spray with high-pressure water.</li>
<li>Rinse with very hot water (120 degrees Fahrenheit for at least two minutes or 140 degrees Fahrenheit for at least 10 seconds).</li>
<li>Dry for at least five days.</li>
</ul>
<p>As boat owners begin taking boats and equipment out of the water for the season, the DNR reminds them to carefully check for aquatic invasive species and contact the DNR with any suspected new infestations. Look on the posts, wheels and underwater support bars of docks and lifts, as well as any parts of boats, pontoons and rafts that may have been submerged in water for an extended period.</p>
<p>Minnesota law requires that docks and lifts be allowed to dry for at least 21 days before being placed in another body of water, whether aquatic invasive species are present or not.</p>
<p>People should <a href="http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/invasives/ais/contacts.html?utm_content=&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_name=&amp;utm_source=govdelivery&amp;utm_term=">contact an area DNR aquatic invasive species specialist</a> if they think they have found zebra mussels or any other invasive species that has not already been confirmed in a lake.</p>
<p>More information is available at <a href="http://www.mndnr.gov/AIS?utm_content=&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_name=&amp;utm_source=govdelivery&amp;utm_term=">www.mndnr.gov/AIS</a>.</p>
]]></content:encoded>
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		<item>
		<title>Zebra mussels confirmed in Lakeville&#8217;s Lake Marion</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2017/09/21/zebra-mussels-confirmed-in-lakevilles-lake-marion/</link>
		<pubDate>Thu, 21 Sep 2017 17:48:08 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[stcarrol]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Aquatic Invasive Species]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=19957</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[City may apply for DNR pilot project treatment The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources has confirmed zebra mussels in Lake Marion, in the city of Lakeville, in Dakota County. Five adult zebra mussels were found at the public access by &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2017/09/21/zebra-mussels-confirmed-in-lakevilles-lake-marion/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<h4><strong><em>City may apply for DNR pilot project treatment</em></strong></h4>
<p>The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources has confirmed zebra mussels in Lake Marion, in the city of Lakeville, in Dakota County.<span id="more-19957"></span></p>
<p>Five adult zebra mussels were found at the public access by a lake consulting business, as part of an early detection monitoring program conducted for the city of Lakeville. The city may apply for a pilot project treatment after a more thorough search of the lake is completed.</p>
<p><a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/lake-marion-zm-0917.jpg"><img class="alignleft size-medium wp-image-19966" src="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/lake-marion-zm-0917-169x300.jpg" alt="" width="169" height="300" srcset="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/lake-marion-zm-0917-169x300.jpg 169w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/lake-marion-zm-0917-42x75.jpg 42w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/lake-marion-zm-0917-768x1365.jpg 768w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/lake-marion-zm-0917-338x600.jpg 338w" sizes="(max-width: 169px) 100vw, 169px" /></a>As boat owners begin taking boats and equipment out of the water for the season, the DNR reminds them to carefully check for aquatic invasive species and contact the DNR with any suspected new infestations. Look on the posts, wheels and underwater support bars of docks and lifts, as well as any parts of boats, pontoons and rafts that may have been submerged in water for an extended period.</p>
<p>Minnesota law requires that docks and lifts be allowed to dry for at least 21 days before being placed in another body of water, whether aquatic invasive species are present or not.</p>
<p>Minnesota law requires boaters and anglers to:</p>
<ul>
<li><strong>Clean</strong> watercraft of aquatic plants and prohibited invasive species<strong>.</strong></li>
<li><strong>Drain</strong> all water by removing drain plugs and keeping them out during transport, and</li>
<li><strong>Dispose</strong> of unwanted bait in the trash.</li>
</ul>
<p>Some invasive species are small and difficult to see at the access. To remove or kill them, take one or more of the following precautions before moving to another waterbody, especially after leaving infested waters:</p>
<ul>
<li>Spray with high-pressure water.</li>
<li>Rinse with very hot water (120 degrees Fahrenheit for at least two minutes or 140 degrees Fahrenheit for at least 10 seconds).</li>
<li>Dry for at least five days.</li>
</ul>
<p>People should <a href="http://links.govdelivery.com:80/track?type=click&amp;enid=ZWFzPTEmbWFpbGluZ2lkPTIwMTcwOTIxLjc4NDUwNjQxJm1lc3NhZ2VpZD1NREItUFJELUJVTC0yMDE3MDkyMS43ODQ1MDY0MSZkYXRhYmFzZWlkPTEwMDEmc2VyaWFsPTE3NDUxODM0JmVtYWlsaWQ9c3RldmUuY2Fycm9sbEBzdGF0ZS5tbi51cyZ1c2VyaWQ9c3RldmUuY2Fycm9sbEBzdGF0ZS5tbi51cyZmbD0mZXh0cmE9TXVsdGl2YXJpYXRlSWQ9JiYm&amp;&amp;&amp;100&amp;&amp;&amp;http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/invasives/ais/contacts.html?utm_content=&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_name=&amp;utm_source=govdelivery&amp;utm_term=">contact an area DNR aquatic invasive species specialist</a> if they think they have found zebra mussels or any other invasive species that has not already been confirmed in a lake.</p>
<p>More information is available at <a href="http://links.govdelivery.com:80/track?type=click&amp;enid=ZWFzPTEmbWFpbGluZ2lkPTIwMTcwOTIxLjc4NDUwNjQxJm1lc3NhZ2VpZD1NREItUFJELUJVTC0yMDE3MDkyMS43ODQ1MDY0MSZkYXRhYmFzZWlkPTEwMDEmc2VyaWFsPTE3NDUxODM0JmVtYWlsaWQ9c3RldmUuY2Fycm9sbEBzdGF0ZS5tbi51cyZ1c2VyaWQ9c3RldmUuY2Fycm9sbEBzdGF0ZS5tbi51cyZmbD0mZXh0cmE9TXVsdGl2YXJpYXRlSWQ9JiYm&amp;&amp;&amp;101&amp;&amp;&amp;http://www.mndnr.gov/AIS?utm_content=&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_name=&amp;utm_source=govdelivery&amp;utm_term=">www.mndnr.gov/AIS</a>.</p>
]]></content:encoded>
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		<item>
		<title>Single zebra mussel confirmed in Lake Harriet</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2017/09/21/single-zebra-mussel-confirmed-in-lake-harriet/</link>
		<pubDate>Thu, 21 Sep 2017 17:43:15 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[stcarrol]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Aquatic Invasive Species]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=19954</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[Extensive multi-agency search showed no other zebra mussels The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources has confirmed that a single zebra mussel was removed from Lake Harriet in Minneapolis. Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board (MPRB) staff reported one adult zebra mussel &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2017/09/21/single-zebra-mussel-confirmed-in-lake-harriet/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<h4><em><strong>Extensive multi-agency search showed no other zebra mussels</strong></em></h4>
<p>The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources has confirmed that a single zebra mussel was removed from Lake Harriet in Minneapolis. Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board (MPRB) staff reported one adult zebra mussel on a boat cover recovered from the bottom of the lake.<span id="more-19954"></span></p>
<p>No additional zebra mussels were found during 67 hours of diving, snorkeling and wading searches involving the Minnehaha Creek Watershed District, MPRB, two MPRB contractors and the DNR. Lake Harriet will be added to the Infested Waters List for zebra mussels, with the provision that it may be removed from the list if future surveys continue to show no zebra mussels in the lake.</p>
<p>“We’re grateful that no zebra mussels were found during the extensive dive, snorkel and wading search of Lake Harriet,” said Heidi Wolf, DNR invasive species unit supervisor. “Strong partnerships and interagency cooperation are key, and we thank the Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board and the Minnehaha Creek Watershed District for their ongoing efforts.</p>
<p>&#8220;While we regret that Lake Harriet will be added to the Infested Waters List because one zebra mussel was confirmed, we’re hopeful that the lake may be removed from the list if future searches continue to show no zebra mussels in the lake,” Wolf said.</p>
<p>DNR invasive species specialist Keegan Lund said Lake Harriet will be carefully monitored the rest of this season and next year, but no treatment is necessary at this time. Lund said individual zebra mussels sometimes die after they are brought into a new lake, before they become established.</p>
<p>“There is a common misperception that zebra mussels are everywhere and that their spread is inevitable. The reality is, of Minnesota’s 11,842 lakes, fewer than 250, about 1.8 percent, are listed as infested with zebra mussels. More Minnesotans than ever before are following our state’s invasive species laws,” Lund said. “People spread zebra mussels, and people can prevent their spread.”</p>
<p>Whether or not a lake is listed as infested, Minnesota law requires boaters and anglers to:</p>
<ul>
<li><strong>Clean</strong> watercraft of aquatic plants and prohibited invasive species<strong>.</strong></li>
</ul>
<ul>
<li><strong>Drain</strong> all water by removing drain plugs and keeping them out during transport, and</li>
</ul>
<ul>
<li><strong>Dispose</strong> of unwanted bait in the trash.</li>
</ul>
<p>Some invasive species are small and difficult to see at the access. To remove or kill them, take one or more of the following precautions before moving to another waterbody, especially after leaving infested waters:</p>
<ul>
<li>Spray with high-pressure water.</li>
<li>Rinse with very hot water (120 degrees Fahrenheit for at least two minutes or 140 degrees Fahrenheit for at least 10 seconds).</li>
<li>Dry for at least five days.</li>
</ul>
<p>People should <a href="http://links.govdelivery.com:80/track?type=click&amp;enid=ZWFzPTEmbWFpbGluZ2lkPTIwMTcwOTIxLjc4NDUxNDMxJm1lc3NhZ2VpZD1NREItUFJELUJVTC0yMDE3MDkyMS43ODQ1MTQzMSZkYXRhYmFzZWlkPTEwMDEmc2VyaWFsPTE3NDUxODU0JmVtYWlsaWQ9c3RldmUuY2Fycm9sbEBzdGF0ZS5tbi51cyZ1c2VyaWQ9c3RldmUuY2Fycm9sbEBzdGF0ZS5tbi51cyZmbD0mZXh0cmE9TXVsdGl2YXJpYXRlSWQ9JiYm&amp;&amp;&amp;100&amp;&amp;&amp;http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/invasives/ais/contacts.html?utm_content=&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_name=&amp;utm_source=govdelivery&amp;utm_term=">contact an area DNR aquatic invasive species specialist</a> if they think they have found zebra mussels or any other invasive species that has not already been confirmed in a lake.</p>
<p>More information is available at <a href="http://links.govdelivery.com:80/track?type=click&amp;enid=ZWFzPTEmbWFpbGluZ2lkPTIwMTcwOTIxLjc4NDUxNDMxJm1lc3NhZ2VpZD1NREItUFJELUJVTC0yMDE3MDkyMS43ODQ1MTQzMSZkYXRhYmFzZWlkPTEwMDEmc2VyaWFsPTE3NDUxODU0JmVtYWlsaWQ9c3RldmUuY2Fycm9sbEBzdGF0ZS5tbi51cyZ1c2VyaWQ9c3RldmUuY2Fycm9sbEBzdGF0ZS5tbi51cyZmbD0mZXh0cmE9TXVsdGl2YXJpYXRlSWQ9JiYm&amp;&amp;&amp;101&amp;&amp;&amp;http://www.mndnr.gov/AIS?utm_content=&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_name=&amp;utm_source=govdelivery&amp;utm_term=">www.mndnr.gov/AIS</a>.</p>
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		<title>Good waterfowl opener expected this weekend</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2017/09/18/good-waterfowl-opener-expected-this-weekend-4/</link>
		<pubDate>Mon, 18 Sep 2017 19:55:44 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[stcarrol]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Hunting]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=19947</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[Duck hunting is expected to be good when Minnesota’s regular waterfowl season opens a half-hour before sunrise on Saturday, Sept. 23. “The number of breeding ducks in Minnesota and North America has been good in recent years, so we’re optimistic &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2017/09/18/good-waterfowl-opener-expected-this-weekend-4/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Duck hunting is expected to be good when Minnesota’s regular waterfowl season opens a half-hour before sunrise on Saturday, Sept. 23.<span id="more-19947"></span></p>
<p>“The number of breeding ducks in Minnesota and North America has been good in recent years, so we’re optimistic that will result in a good duck season,” said Steve Cordts, waterfowl specialist with the Department of Natural Resources. “Wetland habitat conditions and wild rice lakes are in pretty good shape.  Canada goose populations remain high as well, so there’s lots of opportunity to hunt geese this fall.”</p>
<p><strong>Duck seasons and limits</strong><br />
The duck season structure is similar to recent years. The waterfowl seasons are based on a federal framework that applies to all states in the Mississippi Flyway. Waterfowl hunting regulations are available wherever DNR licenses are sold and online at <a href="http://links.govdelivery.com:80/track?type=click&amp;enid=ZWFzPTEmbWFpbGluZ2lkPTIwMTcwOTE4Ljc4Mjk0MzUxJm1lc3NhZ2VpZD1NREItUFJELUJVTC0yMDE3MDkxOC43ODI5NDM1MSZkYXRhYmFzZWlkPTEwMDEmc2VyaWFsPTE3NDUwNzY1JmVtYWlsaWQ9c3RldmUuY2Fycm9sbEBzdGF0ZS5tbi51cyZ1c2VyaWQ9c3RldmUuY2Fycm9sbEBzdGF0ZS5tbi51cyZmbD0mZXh0cmE9TXVsdGl2YXJpYXRlSWQ9JiYm&amp;&amp;&amp;100&amp;&amp;&amp;http://www.mndnr.gov/regulations/hunting?utm_content=&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_name=&amp;utm_source=govdelivery&amp;utm_term=">mndnr.gov/regulations/hunting</a>.</p>
<p>Duck season will be open for 60 days in each of the three waterfowl zones:</p>
<ul>
<li>In the <strong>north zone</strong>, duck season is Sept. 23 through Tuesday, Nov. 21.</li>
<li>In the <strong>central zone</strong>, duck season is Sept. 23 through Sunday, Oct. 1, closes for five days, then reopens Saturday, Oct. 7, and runs through Sunday, Nov. 26.</li>
<li>In the <strong>south zone</strong>, duck season is Sept. 23 through Oct. 1, closes for 12 days, then reopens Saturday, Oct. 14, and runs through Sunday, Dec. 3.</li>
</ul>
<p>The daily duck bag limit remains six per day. The mallard bag limit remains four per day, including no more than two hen mallards. The daily bag limits are three for wood duck and scaup; and two for redheads, canvasbacks and black ducks and one for pintails.</p>
<p>The DNR will post a weekly waterfowl migration report each week during the duck season. The reports are typically posted on Thursday afternoon at <a href="http://links.govdelivery.com:80/track?type=click&amp;enid=ZWFzPTEmbWFpbGluZ2lkPTIwMTcwOTE4Ljc4Mjk0MzUxJm1lc3NhZ2VpZD1NREItUFJELUJVTC0yMDE3MDkxOC43ODI5NDM1MSZkYXRhYmFzZWlkPTEwMDEmc2VyaWFsPTE3NDUwNzY1JmVtYWlsaWQ9c3RldmUuY2Fycm9sbEBzdGF0ZS5tbi51cyZ1c2VyaWQ9c3RldmUuY2Fycm9sbEBzdGF0ZS5tbi51cyZmbD0mZXh0cmE9TXVsdGl2YXJpYXRlSWQ9JiYm&amp;&amp;&amp;101&amp;&amp;&amp;http://mndnr.gov/hunting/waterfowl?utm_content=&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_name=&amp;utm_source=govdelivery&amp;utm_term=">mndnr.gov/hunting/waterfowl</a>.</p>
<p><strong>Goose and sandhill crane seasons</strong><br />
Minnesota’s goose season will reopen in conjunction with the duck season statewide on Sept. 23, with a bag limit of three dark geese per day the entire season. “Dark” geese include Canada geese, white-fronted geese and brant. The daily bag limit for light geese is 20. “Light geese” include snow, blue and Ross’s geese.  Goose season will be closed in the central and south duck zones when duck season is closed.</p>
<p>The season for sandhill cranes remains open through Sunday, Oct. 22 in the northwest goose and sandhill crane zone only. The daily bag limit will be one sandhill crane per day. A $3 sandhill crane permit is required in addition to a small game hunting license.</p>
<p>More information on duck, goose, sandhill crane and other migratory bird hunting is available in the 2017 Minnesota Waterfowl Hunting Regulations booklet from license vendors and online at <a href="http://links.govdelivery.com:80/track?type=click&amp;enid=ZWFzPTEmbWFpbGluZ2lkPTIwMTcwOTE4Ljc4Mjk0MzUxJm1lc3NhZ2VpZD1NREItUFJELUJVTC0yMDE3MDkxOC43ODI5NDM1MSZkYXRhYmFzZWlkPTEwMDEmc2VyaWFsPTE3NDUwNzY1JmVtYWlsaWQ9c3RldmUuY2Fycm9sbEBzdGF0ZS5tbi51cyZ1c2VyaWQ9c3RldmUuY2Fycm9sbEBzdGF0ZS5tbi51cyZmbD0mZXh0cmE9TXVsdGl2YXJpYXRlSWQ9JiYm&amp;&amp;&amp;102&amp;&amp;&amp;http://www.mndnr.gov/hunting/waterfowl?utm_content=&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_name=&amp;utm_source=govdelivery&amp;utm_term=">mndnr.gov/hunting/waterfowl</a>.</p>
]]></content:encoded>
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		<item>
		<title>Citizens can apply to serve on Lake of the Woods input group</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2017/09/18/citizens-can-apply-to-serve-on-lake-of-the-woods-input-group/</link>
		<pubDate>Mon, 18 Sep 2017 19:54:13 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[stcarrol]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fishing]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=19945</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[Citizens interested in volunteering to discuss Lake of the Woods fish and habitat can apply to participate in the Lake of the Woods fisheries input group, according to the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. Applications must be completed by Monday, &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2017/09/18/citizens-can-apply-to-serve-on-lake-of-the-woods-input-group/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Citizens interested in volunteering to discuss Lake of the Woods fish and habitat can apply to participate in the Lake of the Woods fisheries input group, according to the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.<span id="more-19945"></span></p>
<p>Applications must be completed by Monday, Oct. 10, and are available online at <a href="http://www.mndnr.gov/lakeofthewoods">mndnr.gov/lakeofthewoods</a>.</p>
<p>“Input provided by this group will be used to update the Lake of the Woods Fisheries Management Plan for 2018 to 2023,” said Phil Talmage, Baudette area fisheries supervisor.</p>
<p>“Volunteers will give valuable stakeholder perspectives regarding important fisheries and habitat protection strategies for Lake of the Woods and the surrounding watershed,” Talmage said.</p>
<p>Group members will meet five or six times between December and May to cover topics including walleye and sauger management, sportfish population objectives, habitat priorities and invasive species.</p>
<p>Talmage said protecting the high quality resources within Lake of the Woods is important.</p>
<p>“While walleye in Lake of the Woods are a big focus of the DNR’s management efforts, the lake also offers a wide range of fishing and other recreational opportunities that are vital to local communities, important to northern Minnesota and of significant value statewide,” Talmage said.</p>
<p>For additional information on the Lake of the Woods fisheries input group and the self-nomination process, contact the DNR Baudette area fisheries office, 218-634-2522.</p>
]]></content:encoded>
			</item>
		<item>
		<title>Teach a kid to hunt small game during Take a Kid Hunting Weekend</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2017/09/18/teach-a-kid-to-hunt-small-game-during-take-a-kid-hunting-weekend/</link>
		<pubDate>Mon, 18 Sep 2017 19:51:33 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[stcarrol]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Hunting]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=19942</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[Frozen mid-step in the woods, trying to remain undetected in pursuit of squirrels or rabbits – while the pose may seem like yoga, it’s often part of hunting small game. Yet those careful and deliberate movements of yoga do have &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2017/09/18/teach-a-kid-to-hunt-small-game-during-take-a-kid-hunting-weekend/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Frozen mid-step in the woods, trying to remain undetected in pursuit of squirrels or rabbits – while the pose may seem like yoga, it’s often part of hunting small game. <span id="more-19942"></span></p>
<p>Yet those careful and deliberate movements of yoga do have some parallels with how a hunter learns to move through the woods, and teaching the basics through small game hunting is the focus of Take a Kid Hunting Weekend this Saturday, Sept. 23, and Sunday, Sept. 24.</p>
<p>During the weekend, adult Minnesota residents accompanied by a youth younger than age 16 can hunt small game without a license, but must comply with open seasons, limits and other regulations, according to the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.</p>
<p>“Small game hunting is an excellent way to introduce youth to hunting,” said Mike Kurre, DNR mentoring program coordinator. “Starting out pursuing squirrels or rabbits builds essential skills used later on for hunting big game like deer. And for someone new to hunting, it can be a lot of fun.”</p>
<p>Adults can help youth have a good experience by listening to what youth need, and together they can learn the lessons of the forests and fields, added Kurre.</p>
<p>“We encourage adults to keep on mentoring young hunters after this weekend concludes, because often that’s what will keep them going back year after year,” Kurre said.</p>
<p>For more information on small game hunting and hunting regulations, visit <a href="http://www.mndnr.gov/hunting/smallgame">mndnr.gov/hunting/smallgame</a>.</p>
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		<title>Whitefish-tullibee sport-netting to open on northern lakes</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2017/09/18/whitefish-tullibee-sport-netting-to-open-on-northern-lakes-3/</link>
		<pubDate>Mon, 18 Sep 2017 19:50:06 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[stcarrol]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fishing]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=19950</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[Recreational netting for whitefish-tullibee opens on Friday, Oct. 13, on designated lakes that are less susceptible to sudden changes that impact water temperature, according to the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. A $10 license is needed to sport gillnet tullibee &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2017/09/18/whitefish-tullibee-sport-netting-to-open-on-northern-lakes-3/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Recreational netting for whitefish-tullibee opens on Friday, Oct. 13, on designated lakes that are less susceptible to sudden changes that impact water temperature, according to the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. A $10 license is needed to sport gillnet tullibee or whitefish. The season is open to Minnesota residents only.<span id="more-19950"></span></p>
<p>These lakes, known as Schedule II lakes, offer recreational netting on the following schedule:</p>
<ul>
<li>Schedule II A lakes open Friday, Oct. 13, and close Sunday, Dec. 3.</li>
<li>Schedule II B lakes open Friday, Nov. 3, and close Sunday, Dec. 10.</li>
<li>Schedule II C lakes open Friday, Nov. 10, and close Sunday, Dec. 10.</li>
</ul>
<p>Schedule I Lakes, which are more susceptible to factors that impact water temperatures, will be opened and closed on a 48-hour notice posted at lake accesses, other public places, and the DNR website.</p>
<p>The DNR recommends drying nets for 10 days or freezing for two days before moving a net to a new lake, or netting only one lake in a season. Netting in infested waters may be restricted or closed to sport netting of whitefish and tullibee. See the fishing regulations for list of infested waters or online at <a href="http://links.govdelivery.com:80/track?type=click&amp;enid=ZWFzPTEmbWFpbGluZ2lkPTIwMTcwOTE4Ljc4Mjk0MzUxJm1lc3NhZ2VpZD1NREItUFJELUJVTC0yMDE3MDkxOC43ODI5NDM1MSZkYXRhYmFzZWlkPTEwMDEmc2VyaWFsPTE3NDUwNzY1JmVtYWlsaWQ9c3RldmUuY2Fycm9sbEBzdGF0ZS5tbi51cyZ1c2VyaWQ9c3RldmUuY2Fycm9sbEBzdGF0ZS5tbi51cyZmbD0mZXh0cmE9TXVsdGl2YXJpYXRlSWQ9JiYm&amp;&amp;&amp;104&amp;&amp;&amp;http://www.mndnr.gov/invasives/ais/infested.html?utm_content=&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_name=&amp;utm_source=govdelivery&amp;utm_term=">mndnr.gov/invasives/ais/infested.html</a>.</p>
<p>A complete list of all Schedule I and II lakes, status of the seasonal openings and closures, as well as detailed netting regulations are available online at <a href="http://links.govdelivery.com:80/track?type=click&amp;enid=ZWFzPTEmbWFpbGluZ2lkPTIwMTcwOTE4Ljc4Mjk0MzUxJm1lc3NhZ2VpZD1NREItUFJELUJVTC0yMDE3MDkxOC43ODI5NDM1MSZkYXRhYmFzZWlkPTEwMDEmc2VyaWFsPTE3NDUwNzY1JmVtYWlsaWQ9c3RldmUuY2Fycm9sbEBzdGF0ZS5tbi51cyZ1c2VyaWQ9c3RldmUuY2Fycm9sbEBzdGF0ZS5tbi51cyZmbD0mZXh0cmE9TXVsdGl2YXJpYXRlSWQ9JiYm&amp;&amp;&amp;105&amp;&amp;&amp;http://www.mndnr.gov/regulations/fishing?utm_content=&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_name=&amp;utm_source=govdelivery&amp;utm_term=">mndnr.gov/regulations/fishing</a> or by calling the DNR Information Center at 651-296-6157 in the Twin Cities or 888-646-6367 in greater Minnesota.</p>
<p>About 700 people obtain permits to net for whitefish-tullibee each year. The DNR bases netting schedules on expected water temperatures. As the water temperature cools, game fish head to deeper water and whitefish-tullibee come to shallow water for fall spawning. Netting is allowed when there is little chance that game fish populations would be negatively impacted by recreational netting in shallow water.</p>
<p>Minnesota law restricts the size of the net and its openings; requires that netting be done in water not deeper than 6 feet unless specifically authorized; stipulates that netted fish cannot be sold; and requires that any game fish caught must be immediately returned to the lake. State law also limits net size to 100 feet long and 3 feet deep; allows one person to use no more than one net; and forbids recreational netters from possessing angling equipment when netting whitefish-tullibee. Whitefish and tullibee harvested during the sport gillnetting season cannot be used for bait.</p>
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		<title>DNR seeks designs for Minnesota&#8217;s 2018 walleye stamp</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2017/09/18/dnr-seeks-designs-for-minnesotas-2018-walleye-stamp/</link>
		<pubDate>Mon, 18 Sep 2017 19:45:57 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[stcarrol]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fishing]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=19937</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[Artists can submit entries for the 2018 Minnesota Walleye Stamp from Monday, Oct. 9, through Friday, Oct. 20. The voluntary walleye stamp validation costs $5 but is not required to fish for or keep walleye. For an extra 75 cents, &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2017/09/18/dnr-seeks-designs-for-minnesotas-2018-walleye-stamp/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Artists can submit entries for the 2018 Minnesota Walleye Stamp from Monday, Oct. 9, through Friday, Oct. 20.<span id="more-19937"></span></p>
<p>The voluntary walleye stamp validation costs $5 but is not required to fish for or keep walleye. For an extra 75 cents, purchasers will be mailed the pictorial stamp. A pictorial collectable stamp without the validation is available for $5.75. Walleye stamps are available year-round and are not required to be purchased at the same time as fishing licenses.</p>
<p>“Walleye stamps help fund an account used only for walleye stocking,” said Neil Vanderbosch, fisheries program consultant for the Department of Natural Resources. “We use the money to buy walleye from certified private producers that we stock in lakes.”</p>
<p>The stamp contest offers no prizes and is open to Minnesota residents only. The walleye must be the primary focus of the design, though other fish species may be included in the design if they are used to depict common interaction between species or are common inhabitants of Minnesota lakes and rivers.</p>
<p>Artists are not allowed to use any photographic, digital, or electronic imagery product as part of their finished entries. Winning artists usually issue limited edition prints of the artwork and retain proceeds. Judging will take place 2 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 26, at DNR Headquarters, 500 Lafayette Road, St. Paul, MN 55155.</p>
<p>Artists who want to submit entries should closely read contest criteria and guidelines for submitting work, available from the DNR Information Center, 500 Lafayette Road, St. Paul, MN 55155, by calling the Information Center at 651-296-6157 or 888-646-6367, and online at <a href="http://www.mndnr.gov/stamps">www.mndnr.gov/stamps</a></p>
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		<title>DNR opens public comment period on draft PolyMet dam safety and public waters work permits</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2017/09/15/dnr-opens-public-comment-period-on-draft-polymet-dam-safety-and-public-waters-work-permits/</link>
		<pubDate>Fri, 15 Sep 2017 18:09:26 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[stcarrol]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Polymet]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=19935</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[The Department of Natural Resources is seeking comments, from Sept. 15 through Oct. 16, on two draft dam safety permits and a draft public waters work permit for the Poly Met Mining, Inc. (PolyMet) NorthMet mining project. The permits relate &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2017/09/15/dnr-opens-public-comment-period-on-draft-polymet-dam-safety-and-public-waters-work-permits/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>The Department of Natural Resources is seeking comments, from Sept. 15 through Oct. 16, on two draft dam safety permits and a draft public waters work permit for the Poly Met Mining, Inc. (PolyMet) NorthMet mining project. The permits relate to a proposed copper-nickel mine near Hoyt Lakes in northeastern Minnesota. <span id="more-19935"></span><br />
This is the public’s opportunity to submit written comments on these draft permits.<br />
One draft dam safety permit covers the proposed flotation tailings basin, which would receive tailings (a mixture of finely ground waste rock and water) after the commercially recoverable copper, nickel and other elements are removed. This proposed tailings basin would be on the site of the existing tailings basin of the historic LTV iron ore mine.</p>
<p>The second draft dam safety permit covers the proposed hydrometallurgical residue facility, which would receive residue (mostly gypsum) generated from a process that would use pressure and temperature reactions to extract additional precious metals beyond what can be achieved by the primary processing facility.</p>
<p>PolyMet initially submitted its dam safety permit applications in July 2016. Since then, the DNR, its external consultant Emmons Olivier Resources, Inc. (EOR), and a team of top geotechnical dam safety experts assessed the design, construction, operation, and maintenance of the proposed NorthMet dams. This team included experts in mining geotechnical engineering with both Minnesota and worldwide experience. The group included a member of the review panel that previously investigated the Mount Polley dam failure in British Columbia.</p>
<p>The DNR considered input from state, local, and tribal government technical experts. The applications have been used to create the two draft dam safety permits, which the DNR is now releasing for public comment.</p>
<p>The DNR dam safety permit program regulates the construction, operation, and maintenance of Minnesota dams to protect public health, safety and welfare. Minnesota rules establish standards and criteria for dams, which cover both initial permitting and ongoing regulatory oversight.</p>
<p>PolyMet also submitted an application for a public waters work permit in May 2017. The DNR recently completed its comprehensive review of this application, and considered input from state, local, and tribal government technical experts to create the draft public waters work permit.</p>
<p>The draft public waters work permit is for a culvert extension to widen Dunka Road, the connecting road between the proposed NorthMet plant site and mine site. It would extend the culvert on Unnamed Creek, which is a tributary to Wyman Creek, a public water.<br />
The DNR public waters work permit program applies to public water basins, wetlands, and watercourses. A public waters work permit may be required for proposed projects that affect the course, current, or cross-section of public waters.</p>
<p>The DNR is seeking public comments on these three draft permits before making any permitting decisions. Commenters should include the words “NorthMet Dam Safety” or “NorthMet Public Waters” in the title of their comment emails or letters.</p>
<p>Written comments may be submitted no later than Oct. 16, by email to:<br />
<a href="mailto:NorthMetPermitting.DNR@state.mn.us">NorthMetPermitting.DNR@state.mn.us</a> or by U.S. mail to:</p>
<p>MN Department of Natural Resources<br />
ATTN: PolyMet NorthMet Project<br />
500 Lafayette Road N, Box 45<br />
St. Paul, MN 55155-4045</p>
<p>In addition to the two dam safety permits and the public waters work permit, the project would need nine additional DNR permits, as well as several other state, federal and local permits and approvals in order to proceed.</p>
<p>The DNR permits and approvals that are needed before the proposed NorthMet project could proceed, include the permit to mine (including financial assurance and wetlands replacement), water appropriation permits, dam safety permits, public waters work permit, burning permit, and an endangered species takings permit. <a href="http://files.dnr.state.mn.us/lands_minerals/northmet/northmet_dnr_permit_processes.pdf?utm_content=&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_name=&amp;utm_source=govdelivery&amp;utm_term=">A timeline of the permitting process</a> is available from the DNR’s PolyMet website.</p>
<p>PolyMet’s dam safety and public waters work permit applications, along with DNR’s draft permits and fact sheets, are available on the <a href="http://polymet.mn.gov/?utm_content=&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_name=&amp;utm_source=govdelivery&amp;utm_term=">State’s PolyMet Portal</a> (click on the DNR link).</p>
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		<title>Paleontology Day featured at Hill Annex Mine State Park</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2017/09/14/paleontology-day-featured-at-hill-annex-mine-state-park/</link>
		<pubDate>Thu, 14 Sep 2017 21:35:18 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[chzeppel]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Grand Rapids]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Region 2-NE]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[State Parks]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=19931</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[Hill Annex Mine State Park, in partnership with the Calumet Public Library, will host a special Paleontology Day on Saturday, Sept. 23 with a day of fossil hunting tours. Staff from the Science Museum of Minnesota will help lead the &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2017/09/14/paleontology-day-featured-at-hill-annex-mine-state-park/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Hill Annex Mine State Park, in partnership with the Calumet Public Library, will host a special Paleontology Day on Saturday, Sept. 23 with a day of fossil hunting tours. Staff from the Science Museum of Minnesota will help lead the fossil hunting tours and assist visitors with identification.  <span id="more-19931"></span></p>
<p>The park gates will be open from 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Tours begin at 10 a.m. and last about 1 hour, 15 minutes.  The final tour will depart at 2 p.m. and return at 3:15 p.m.</p>
<p>Tours begin at the clubhouse museum, then board a bus for a short trip through the complex and stop at the fossil/ore pile. Visitors can spend as much time as they wish digging through the fossil/ore pile and have the option to return to the clubhouse on a later bus.</p>
<p>Tours prices are $10 for adults, $6 for children age 6 and older, and free for children age 5 and younger.</p>
<p>Historical archivist, Ian Dunshee, will be on site throughout the day presenting his work on cataloging the oral histories of former mine workers and artifacts from the mine.</p>
<p>“Hill Annex Mine State Park officially closed for the season on Labor Day Weekend, but we wanted to offer a day dedicated to the paleontology work that was conducted here by the Science Museum of Minnesota,” said park manager, Jordan Schaefer. Visitors are invited to bring a picnic lunch and make use of the picnic area. No RSVP is required.</p>
<p>Hill Annex Mine State Park is located at 800 Gary Street, Calumet, Minn. Entrance to the park is on the north edge of Calumet off State Highway 169, halfway between Grand Rapids and Hibbing.</p>
<p>Questions about the Paleontology Day program can be directed to Scenic State Park office at 218-743-3362. More information about Hill Annex Mine State Park can be found at <a href="http://www.mndnr.gov/state_parks/hill_annex_mine">www.mndnr.gov/state_parks/hill_annex_mine</a>.</p>
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		<title>Shakopee artist wins duck stamp contest</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2017/09/14/shakopee-artist-wins-duck-stamp-contest/</link>
		<pubDate>Thu, 14 Sep 2017 17:05:13 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[Caleb Werth]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Waterfowl]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Wildlife]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=19928</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[A painting of a white-winged scoter by Shakopee artist Mark Thone will be featured on the 2018 Minnesota Migratory Waterfowl Stamp, after he won the annual stamp contest sponsored by the Department of Natural Resources. This was Thone’s first time &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2017/09/14/shakopee-artist-wins-duck-stamp-contest/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>A painting of a white-winged scoter by Shakopee artist Mark Thone will be featured on the 2018 Minnesota Migratory Waterfowl Stamp, after he won the annual stamp contest sponsored by the Department of Natural Resources.</p>
<p><span id="more-19928"></span></p>
<p>This was Thone’s first time winning the duck stamp contest.</p>
<div id="attachment_19929" style="width: 310px" class="wp-caption alignleft"><img class="size-medium wp-image-19929" src="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/Waterfowl-stamp-2018-300x217.jpg" alt="2018 Waterfowl Stamp" width="300" height="217" srcset="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/Waterfowl-stamp-2018-300x217.jpg 300w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/Waterfowl-stamp-2018-75x54.jpg 75w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/Waterfowl-stamp-2018-768x555.jpg 768w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/Waterfowl-stamp-2018-600x433.jpg 600w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/Waterfowl-stamp-2018.jpg 990w" sizes="(max-width: 300px) 100vw, 300px" /><p class="wp-caption-text">2018 Waterfowl Stamp competition.<br />First Place: Mark Thone</p></div>
<p>The winning painting was selected by judges from among 16 entries. Four entries advanced as finalists that were selected during the Sept. 7 contest. The other finalists were Michael Sieve, second place; John Barnard, third place; and Stephen Hamrick, fourth place. The duck stamp contest began in 1977.</p>
<p>The waterfowl stamp validation for hunting is $7.50 and for an extra 75 cents purchasers can receive the pictorial stamp. It also is sold as a collectible. Revenue from stamp sales is dedicated to waterfowl management and habitat work. Stamp sales generate about $700,000 per year for waterfowl habitat enhancement projects on state wildlife management areas and shallow lakes.</p>
<p>The DNR offers no prizes for the stamp contest winner, but the winning artist retains the right to reproduce the work. Each year the entries are limited to a predetermined species that breeds or migrates through Minnesota. The eligible species for the 2019 stamp design will be the gadwall. For more on the stamp contests, visit <a href="http://www.mndnr.gov/stamps">mndnr.gov/stamps</a>.</p>
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		<title>DNR seeks citizens to serve on spending oversight committees</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2017/09/14/dnr-seeks-citizens-to-serve-on-spending-oversight-committees-2/</link>
		<pubDate>Thu, 14 Sep 2017 17:01:13 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[Caleb Werth]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fisheries]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Wildlife]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=19926</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[Minnesotans who would like to serve on committees that review how the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources spends game and fish fund dollars are welcome to submit an application by Sept. 25. The DNR is seeking at least 12 people &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2017/09/14/dnr-seeks-citizens-to-serve-on-spending-oversight-committees-2/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Minnesotans who would like to serve on committees that review how the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources spends game and fish fund dollars are welcome to submit an application by Sept. 25.</p>
<p><span id="more-19926"></span></p>
<p>The DNR is seeking at least 12 people to serve on the Fisheries Oversight and Wildlife Oversight committees. Appointees will be responsible for reviewing the agency’s annual Game and Fish Fund Report in detail and, following discussions with agency leaders and others, write a report on the findings of this review. About half of the current members’ terms expire on Dec. 14, 2017, and are subject to this open application.</p>
<p>The two committees are comprised of members identified through a self-nomination process. Those who want to serve on the committees should have a strong interest in natural resource management and how it is funded. DNR Commissioner Tom Landwehr will appoint committee members for three-year terms. Applications are being accepted until Sept. 25 online at the DNR’s Game and Fish Fund Budgetary Oversight webpage at <a href="http://www.mndnr.gov/gamefishoversight">mndnr.gov/gamefishoversight</a>.</p>
<p>Though not well known, Minnesota’s Game and Fish Fund is the fiscal foundation for many of the state’s core natural resource management functions. Upwards of $110 million a year is deposited into this fund from hunting and fishing license sales, a sales tax on lottery tickets, and other sources of revenue, including a reimbursement based on a federal excise tax on certain hunting, fishing and boating equipment.</p>
<p>Committee members participate in a mid-December orientation meeting and one to two meetings per month January to May. Meetings are generally two hours in the evening at DNR headquarters in St. Paul, with the total time commitment estimated at 20 to 40 hours, plus travel time. Some members also attend monthly joint Budgetary Oversight Committee meetings January to May and may complete their report via email correspondence. Estimated additional time commitment is 12-15 hours, plus travel time. Members are asked to make three-year commitment.</p>
<p>Past DNR Game and Fish Fund expenditure reports and citizen oversight committee reports are also available at <a href="http://www.mndnr.gov/gamefishoversight">mndnr.gov/gamefishoversight</a>.</p>
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		<title>Program evaluation finds efficiencies for walleye stocking</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2017/09/14/program-evaluation-finds-efficiencies-for-walleye-stocking/</link>
		<pubDate>Thu, 14 Sep 2017 16:59:20 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[Caleb Werth]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fisheries]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=19924</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[A new review has found that greater efficiencies can be realized in a walleye stocking program that doubled the amount of young walleye called fingerlings released into Minnesota lakes starting in the late 1990s. The review by the Minnesota Department &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2017/09/14/program-evaluation-finds-efficiencies-for-walleye-stocking/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>A new review has found that greater efficiencies can be realized in a walleye stocking program that doubled the amount of young walleye called fingerlings released into Minnesota lakes starting in the late 1990s.</p>
<p><span id="more-19924"></span></p>
<p>The review by the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources centered on the 254 lakes in the Accelerated Walleye Program. As a result of the review, the DNR plans to continue stocking fingerlings in some of these lakes at the same rate, but on other lakes anglers will benefit from actually reducing fingerling stocking rates.</p>
<p>“With fish stocking, sometimes less is more,” said Don Pereira, DNR fisheries chief. “Our review found that 70 percent of the 254 lakes saw no improvement in walleye numbers – some even had declines in walleye – after we massively increased stocking in them. That tells us we need to be more efficient in how we stock fingerlings.”</p>
<p>Going forward, area fisheries managers will continue to play a significant role in setting stocking levels, with stocking tied to lake management plans that include considerations of a lake’s available habitat, prey availability and past success stocking fish. They have been working with lake associations and other interested anglers to review the results of this evaluation on individual lakes and consider changes to lake management plans based on the findings.</p>
<p>The review found:</p>
<ul>
<li>On 70 lakes, stocking at high densities should continue.</li>
<li>On 45 lakes, stocking will continue at high densities until evaluations can be completed.</li>
<li>On 10 lakes, stocking density or stocking frequency should be increased.</li>
<li>On 85 of the 254 lakes, stocking density should be reduced.</li>
<li>On 36 lakes, stocking should be converted to fry.</li>
<li>On eight lakes, stocking should be discontinued.</li>
</ul>
<p>“Walleye fishing is excellent in Minnesota because of the large lakes and habitat in other high quality lakes and rivers that support natural walleye reproduction,” Pereira said. “In fact, some 85 percent of the walleye caught in Minnesota are wild.”</p>
<p>Overall in Minnesota, anglers catch most walleye from waters where the fish reproduce naturally – about 260 larger walleye lakes and in large rivers. Because of stocking, walleye can be found in an additional 1,300 Minnesota lakes spread throughout the state. And where fry stocking works well, walleye abundance is close to the abundance in the state’s top lakes with natural reproduction and considerably higher than lakes stocked with fingerlings.</p>
<p>Fingerlings are several months old; fry are newly hatched fish. Roughly one-third of the fry hatched each year by the DNR are kept in rearing ponds throughout the summer and are stocked as fingerlings in the fall. The other two-thirds of the fry are stocked directly into lakes within a few days of hatching. Fisheries biologists check on the survival of stocked fingerlings or fry with follow-up assessments.</p>
<p>To know what lakes are stocked, locate a lake at <a href="http://www.mndnr.gov/lakefind">mndnr.gov/lakefind</a> and click the fish stocking tab. General information about fishing in Minnesota can be found at <a href="http://www.mndnr.gov/fishing">mndnr.gov/fishing</a>.</p>
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		<title>Lance Morgan of North Branch named DNR firearms safety instructor of the year</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2017/09/14/lance-morgan-of-north-branch-named-dnr-firearms-safety-instructor-of-the-year/</link>
		<pubDate>Thu, 14 Sep 2017 16:57:34 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[Caleb Werth]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Hunting]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=19922</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[Lance Morgan of North Branch has been named the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (DNR) Firearms Safety Volunteer Instructor of the Year for 2016. Morgan recently received his award at Game Fair, held in Anoka. Morgan has been a firearms &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2017/09/14/lance-morgan-of-north-branch-named-dnr-firearms-safety-instructor-of-the-year/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Lance Morgan of North Branch has been named the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (DNR) Firearms Safety Volunteer Instructor of the Year for 2016. Morgan recently received his award at Game Fair, held in Anoka.</p>
<p><span id="more-19922"></span></p>
<p>Morgan has been a firearms safety instructor for 10 years and has worked tirelessly to organize, teach and recruit youth hunters through the program, as well as recruiting new instructors to expand the capacity and availability of safety training.</p>
<p>Outside of the classroom, Morgan is 4-H club coach, National Wild Turkey Federation chapter president, and an avid turkey and big game hunter. Morgan has volunteered his time to be a youth turkey hunt mentor every year since the program began and his local NWTF chapter is consistently one of the most active in the hunt.</p>
<p>In 2016, he and other firearms safety instructors joined the Chisago Lakes Sportsman’s Club, NWTF and the DNR to host an outdoor skills and safety field day for more than 60 local youth.</p>
<p>“I’d like to thank my fellow instructors and volunteers for their help. I couldn’t do it without them,” said Morgan.</p>
<p>From the many volunteer hours spent organizing youth training, to securing permission from landowners to allow kids a place to hunt, and encouraging a camaraderie between youth and their mentors, Morgan’s commitment to growing the next generation of ethical hunters and conservationists is evident.</p>
<p>“Lance’s emphasis on safety is second to none and has a lasting impact on the hundreds of students he has taught in the classroom and in the field over the years,” said DNR Conservation Officer, Phil Mohs, who nominated Morgan for the award. “I have had the great pleasure of checking several of his students last fall while they were hunting and was pleased to see first-hand that they were focused on safety and ethics during my contact with them. The students were a true reflection of Lance and the other volunteer instructors he surrounds himself with.”</p>
<p>The firearms safety program began in 1955 and has certified more than 1.3 million students to date. More than 4,000 volunteer instructors teach DNR firearms safety courses across the state, and, on average, they certify 24,000 youth and adults each year.</p>
<p>“Without the dedication of these men and women teaching these courses, this program would not be possible,” said Jon Paurus, DNR enforcement education program coordinator.</p>
<p>A DNR firearms certification is required of anyone born after Dec. 31, 1979 to purchase a hunting license in Minnesota. Youth ages 11 and older can attend a firearms safety certification course and receive their certificate. The firearms safety certificate becomes valid at age 12.</p>
<p>For more information on the dates and locations of these courses, see an online list at <a href="http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/safety/firearms/index.html">mndnr.gov/safety/firearms/index.html</a> <a href="http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/safety/vehicle/snowmobile/cd.html%20or%20call%20800-366-8917">or call 800-366-8917</a>.</p>
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		<title>Zebra mussels confirmed in North Star Lake in Itasca County</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2017/09/14/zebra-mussels-confirmed-in-north-star-lake-in-itasca-county/</link>
		<pubDate>Thu, 14 Sep 2017 16:52:51 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[Caleb Werth]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Aitkin]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Aquatic Invasive Species]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Region 1-NW]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=19920</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (DNR) has confirmed zebra mussels in North Star Lake in northern Minnesota’s Itasca County. A North Star Lake resident contacted the DNR after finding zebra mussels when removing a dock and boat lift. DNR &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2017/09/14/zebra-mussels-confirmed-in-north-star-lake-in-itasca-county/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (DNR) has confirmed zebra mussels in North Star Lake in northern Minnesota’s Itasca County.</p>
<p><span id="more-19920"></span></p>
<p>A North Star Lake resident contacted the DNR after finding zebra mussels when removing a dock and boat lift. DNR staff confirmed juvenile zebra mussels along the lakeshore and at the nearby public access. They confirmed adult zebra mussels several hundred feet south of the location of the initial report.</p>
<p>As boat owners begin taking boats and equipment out of the water for the season, the DNR reminds them to carefully check for aquatic invasive species and contact the DNR with any suspected new infestations. Look on the posts, wheels and underwater support bars of docks and lifts, as well as any parts of boats, pontoons and rafts that may have been submerged in water for an extended period.</p>
<p>Minnesota law requires that docks and lifts be allowed to dry for at least 21 days before being placed into another body of water, whether aquatic invasive species are present or not.</p>
<p>For the many still actively using lakes this year, Minnesota law requires boaters and anglers to:</p>
<ul>
<li><strong>Clean</strong> watercraft of aquatic plants and prohibited invasive species,</li>
<li><strong>Drain</strong> all water by removing drain plugs and keeping them out during transport, and</li>
<li><strong>Dispose</strong> of unwanted bait in the trash.</li>
</ul>
<p>Some invasive species are small and difficult to see at the access. To remove or kill them, take one or more of the following precautions before moving to another waterbody, especially after leaving infested waters:</p>
<ul>
<li>Spray with high-pressure water.</li>
<li>Rinse with very hot water (120 degrees F for at least two minutes or 140 degrees F for at least 10 seconds).</li>
<li>Dry for at least five days.</li>
</ul>
<p>People should <a href="http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/invasives/ais/contacts.html">contact area DNR aquatic invasive species specialist</a> if they think they have found zebra mussels or any other invasive species that has not already been confirmed in a lake.</p>
<p>More information is available at <a href="http://www.mndnr.gov/AIS">www.mndnr.gov/AIS</a>.</p>
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		<title>Zebra mussels confirmed in Ten Mile Lake in Otter Tail County</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2017/09/11/zebra-mussels-confirmed-in-ten-mile-lake-in-otter-tail-county/</link>
		<pubDate>Mon, 11 Sep 2017 18:59:17 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[stcarrol]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Aquatic Invasive Species]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Region 1-NW]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=19902</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources has confirmed zebra mussels in Ten Mile Lake in west-central Minnesota’s Otter Tail County. Staff at Ten Mile Lake Resort contacted the DNR when they found suspected zebra mussels on a pontoon boat being &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2017/09/11/zebra-mussels-confirmed-in-ten-mile-lake-in-otter-tail-county/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources has confirmed zebra mussels in Ten Mile Lake in west-central Minnesota’s Otter Tail County.<span id="more-19902"></span></p>
<p>Staff at Ten Mile Lake Resort contacted the DNR when they found suspected zebra mussels on a pontoon boat being removed from the lake. DNR invasive species specialists surveyed the area and collected 16 zebra mussels from other equipment in the same area.</p>
<p>During a broader search, DNR staff located one zebra mussel attached to the dock wheel at the public water access, approximately 1.3 miles from the reported location. All of the zebra mussels were less than one-quarter inch in length.</p>
<p>Because of a navigable waterway and connected waters, the DNR is considering whether connected waters will be added to the Infested Waters List.</p>
<p>As boat owners begin taking boats and equipment out of the water for the season, the DNR reminds them to carefully check for aquatic invasive species and contact the DNR with any suspected new infestations. Minnesota law requires that docks and lifts be allowed to dry for at least 21 days before being placed into another body of water, whether aquatic invasive species are present or not.</p>
<p>For the many still actively using lakes this year, Minnesota law requires boaters and anglers to:</p>
<ul>
<li><strong>Clean</strong> watercraft of aquatic plants and prohibited invasive species,</li>
<li><strong>Drain</strong> all water by removing drain plugs and keeping them out during transport, and</li>
<li><strong>Dispose</strong> of unwanted bait in the trash.</li>
</ul>
<p>Some invasive species are small and difficult to see at the access. To remove or kill them, take one or more of the following precautions before moving to another waterbody, especially after leaving infested waters:</p>
<ul>
<li>Spray with high-pressure water.</li>
<li>Rinse with very hot water (120 degrees F for at least two minutes or 140 degrees F for at least 10 seconds).</li>
<li>Dry for at least five days.</li>
</ul>
<p>People should contact an area <a href="mailto:http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/invasives/ais/contacts.html">DNR aquatic invasive species specialist</a> if they think they have found zebra mussels or any other invasive species that have not already been confirmed in a lake.</p>
<p>More information is available at <a href="http://www.mndnr.gov/AIS?utm_content=&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_name=&amp;utm_source=govdelivery&amp;utm_term=">www.mndnr.gov/AIS</a>.</p>
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		<title>DNR honors 2 youths for their conservation efforts</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2017/09/11/dnr-honors-2-youths-for-their-conservation-efforts/</link>
		<pubDate>Mon, 11 Sep 2017 18:52:35 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[stcarrol]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=19899</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources honored two youths for their outstanding conservation efforts during a ceremony Friday, Sept. 1, at the DNR volunteer outdoor stage at the Minnesota State Fair. The DNR commissioner’s youth awards are given annually to &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2017/09/11/dnr-honors-2-youths-for-their-conservation-efforts/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources honored two youths for their outstanding conservation efforts during a ceremony Friday, Sept. 1, at the DNR volunteer outdoor stage at the Minnesota State Fair.<span id="more-19899"></span></p>
<p>The DNR commissioner’s youth awards are given annually to an FFA student and 4-H member who have demonstrated initiative, leadership, creativity and achievement in conservation and wise use of natural and agricultural resources. This is the 26th year of the award program.</p>
<p>Lawrence Mettler from Burtrum, Minnesota, in Todd County, received the 4-H award, and Gunnar Frahm from Silver Bay, Minnesota, in Lake County, received the Future Farmers of America (FFA) award.</p>
<div id="attachment_19913" style="width: 310px" class="wp-caption alignright"><a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/2017-Fair_4H-award_Mettler_Commissioner.jpg"><img class="wp-image-19913 size-medium" src="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/2017-Fair_4H-award_Mettler_Commissioner-300x249.jpg" alt="" width="300" height="249" srcset="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/2017-Fair_4H-award_Mettler_Commissioner-300x249.jpg 300w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/2017-Fair_4H-award_Mettler_Commissioner-75x62.jpg 75w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/2017-Fair_4H-award_Mettler_Commissioner-768x637.jpg 768w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/2017-Fair_4H-award_Mettler_Commissioner-600x497.jpg 600w" sizes="(max-width: 300px) 100vw, 300px" /></a><p class="wp-caption-text">Wonderful Water theme; 4H award winner Lawrence Mettler with DNR Commissioner Tom Landwehr</p></div>
<p>Encouraged by his teacher to pursue a project he was truly interested in, Mettler choose zebra mussels as the focus for his 4-H project. His project highlighted the fact that zebra mussels are an invasive species that cause detrimental impacts to Minnesota’s environment and economy. Hundreds of Minnesota’s lakes are infested with zebra mussels, and they continue to spread.</p>
<p>At the award ceremony, Mettler explained to the audience the measures that everyone should take to prevent the further spread of zebra mussels, such as the “Clean, Drain, Dry” techniques promoted by the DNR and its partners. Mettler is in 12th grade, and hopes to someday pursue a career in natural resource management. He is the son of Randy and Margaret Mettler.</p>
<div id="attachment_19915" style="width: 310px" class="wp-caption alignleft"><a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/2017-Fair_DNR_FFA-Award_Frahm_Commissioner.jpg"><img class="wp-image-19915 size-medium" src="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/2017-Fair_DNR_FFA-Award_Frahm_Commissioner-300x239.jpg" alt="" width="300" height="239" srcset="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/2017-Fair_DNR_FFA-Award_Frahm_Commissioner-300x239.jpg 300w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/2017-Fair_DNR_FFA-Award_Frahm_Commissioner-75x60.jpg 75w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/2017-Fair_DNR_FFA-Award_Frahm_Commissioner-768x613.jpg 768w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/2017-Fair_DNR_FFA-Award_Frahm_Commissioner-600x479.jpg 600w" sizes="(max-width: 300px) 100vw, 300px" /></a><p class="wp-caption-text">Wonderful Water theme. Commissioner&#8217;s FFA award recipient Gunnar Frahm with DNR Commissioner Tom Landwehr</p></div>
<p>Gunnar Frahm received the Commissioner’s FFA Youth award. His FFA project included three components: development of a butterfly garden, a Chaga mushroom experiment, and a white pine study. Noticing the heavy deer browsing and low survival of tree saplings, Frahm decided to research different methods for protecting young white pines.</p>
<p>He worked with staff at Tettegouche State Park to set up the research project, ultimately concluding that a lanolin-based spray was the most effective and efficient method tested.</p>
<p>At the award ceremony, Frahm explained to the audience that he hopes his findings will help others working to restore white pines. He is enrolled at the University of Minnesota-Duluth with a strong interest in the medical field. Frahm was joined at the award ceremony by his mother, Maureen Frahm.</p>
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		<title>Smartphones are a smart tool to start hunting</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2017/09/11/smartphones-are-a-smart-tool-to-start-hunting/</link>
		<pubDate>Mon, 11 Sep 2017 18:43:13 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[stcarrol]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Hunting]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=19894</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[The first step is the hardest. That exercise adage often applies to hunting, too. Yet, not the case, if hunters have a smartphone. For if they do, they can simply flick their fingers to mndnr.gov and do the following: Buy &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2017/09/11/smartphones-are-a-smart-tool-to-start-hunting/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>The first step is the hardest.</p>
<p>That exercise adage often applies to hunting, too.</p>
<p>Yet, not the case, if hunters have a smartphone. For if they do, they can simply flick their fingers to <a href="http://www.mndnr.gov">mndnr.gov </a>and do the following:<span id="more-19894"></span></p>
<p><strong>Buy a license:</strong> Yes, without ever standing in line hunters can buy a license and most necessary stamps. They just need to have driver’s license or firearms safety certificate identification number handy, plus a credit or debit card for payment. Some youth licenses are free, and others cost as little as $5. For most licenses that require a tag (deer, for example) people need to buy the license using the full website, not the mobile version of the site, and must wait for the tag to arrive by mail before hunting.</p>
<p><strong>Check regulations:</strong> Both the hunting and trapping regulation booklet and the waterfowl hunting booklet are online.</p>
<p><strong>Waive firearms safety training:</strong> Don’t have a state-issued firearms safety certificate? That’s not a problem. Like many states, Minnesota allows residents and nonresidents to waive the firearms safety certificate requirement under certain limited exemptions. Minnesota’s twice-in-a-lifetime exemption allows youth and adults to hunt small game, deer and bear without firearms safety training so long as they are in unaided visual and verbal contact with each other. Cost of the apprentice hunter validation is $3.50. A hunting license is also required. Firearms safety training is mandatory for those hunting in Minnesota who were born after Dec. 31, 1979.</p>
<p><strong>Find a place to hunt:</strong> Don’t know where to go? That’s not a problem, either. The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources manages 1,400 wildlife management areas that total 1.3 million acres. To find a nearby or distant WMA, simply go to “Recreation Compass” on the DNR website. This mobile application, which features an aerial photo of the entire state, allows hunters to zoom in and out to easily find WMAs all across the state. The detailed photos and boundary lines allow them to actually see what the landscape looks like, thereby allowing them to plan a hunt from home or in their vehicle. For hunters who already know where they’re going, they can access the same information by searching by WMA name or county at <a href="http://www.mndnr.gov/wmas">mndnr.gov/wmas</a>.</p>
<p><strong>Discover a grouse hunting walking trail:</strong> Want to take advantage of higher ruffed grouse numbers this season? Again, no problem. The DNR’s “Hunter Walking Trails” web pages can help people find hundreds of miles of trail throughout central and northern Minnesota. The walking trail web pages can help hunters find trails in the county of their choice. Trail maps, which are essentially aerial photos of the land they’ll be hunting, can be downloaded and printed.</p>
<p><strong>Get a permit to hunt certain private lands:</strong> For $3, hunters can purchase a Walk-in Access program validation that allows access to 26,700 acres of private land from Sept. 1 through May 31. These lands are located in 46 counties throughout the pheasant range. Maps of all Walk-In Access sites are available electronically at <a href="http://www.mndnr.gov/walkin">mndnr.gov/walkin</a>. Visually, walk-in lands are identified by bright yellow-green signs at boundary corners. So, if hunters see a nice-looking Walk-In Access area this hunting season, they can simply use a phone to purchase a validation. They can be hunting it in minutes.</p>
<p><strong>Explore every deer permit areas:</strong> Visit <a href="http://www.mndnr.gov/deermap">mndnr.gov/deermap </a>to access an interactive map of every deer permit area in Minnesota. By clicking on a permit area or selecting one from the drop-down list at the top, people find information about the area’s management designation, dates of all deer seasons, whether mandatory disease testing is in place and a direct link to deer hunting regulations. A “detail report” link provides historical harvest statistics, land cover type, public land listings and historical winter severity indexes.</p>
<p><strong>Register deer, turkey and other game:</strong> Not long ago, deer and certain other types of hunters had to drive to a registration station to report their harvest. Today, hunters can save gas and time by connecting to the internet at <a href="http://www.mndnr.gov/gameregistration">mndnr.gov/gameregistration</a> to report their harvest information.</p>
<p>“Those without a smartphone can always buy a license and register game with an ordinary phone,” said Paul Telander, DNR wildlife chief. “The toll-free number for licenses is 888-665-4236 and to register deer call 888-706-6367.”</p>
<p>Telander said efforts to make Minnesota hunting information more smartphone friendly has been rewarding to see.</p>
<p>“It’s never been easier to buy a license, find a place to hunt and register your game,” said Telander. “Hunting will always involve work. Yet these days, a lot of hunters are saving boot leather and tire tread by putting their phones to work.”</p>
<p>&nbsp;</p>
<p class="gdp" style="margin: 0in 0in 7.5pt 0in;">
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		<title>Hunters reminded about whole carcass importation ban</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2017/09/11/hunters-reminded-about-whole-carcass-importation-ban/</link>
		<pubDate>Mon, 11 Sep 2017 18:39:54 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[stcarrol]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Hunting]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=19891</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[Hunters who harvest deer, elk, moose or caribou outside of Minnesota are reminded that whole carcasses cannot be brought into the state. The prohibition on importation of whole carcasses of these cervids from anywhere in North America was put into &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2017/09/11/hunters-reminded-about-whole-carcass-importation-ban/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Hunters who harvest deer, elk, moose or caribou outside of Minnesota are reminded that whole carcasses cannot be brought into the state.<span id="more-19891"></span></p>
<p>The prohibition on importation of whole carcasses of these cervids from anywhere in North America was put into place last year as a proactive measure to reduce the risk of chronic wasting disease in Minnesota and bring consistency to regulations.</p>
<p>“Because of the increasing prevalence and distribution of CWD in North America in both farmed and wild cervids, we decided in 2016 to impose an across-the-board importation ban,” said Lou Cornicelli, wildlife research manager for the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.</p>
<p>Previously, Minnesota’s Board of Animal Health, the agency responsible for regulating farmed cervids, placed carcass import restrictions on specific areas of North America. Those areas could change based on disease prevalence. Now the carcass import restriction applies permanently to all of North America.</p>
<p>“With the new infections occurring at all times of the year, it made more sense to impose one ban that applied uniformly across the nation. It is now much easier for hunters to interpret this regulation,” Cornicelli said.</p>
<p>This restriction is part of efforts to minimize the opportunity for CWD to become established in Minnesota.</p>
<p>Only the following cervid parts may be brought into Minnesota:</p>
<ul>
<li>Quarters or other portions of meat with no part of the spinal column or head attached;</li>
<li>Meat that is boned-out or that is cut and wrapped (either commercially or privately);</li>
<li>Hides and teeth;</li>
<li>Antlers or clean (no brain tissue attached) skull plates with antlers attached; and</li>
<li>Finished taxidermy mounts.</li>
</ul>
<p>“We realize this may be a departure from tradition; however, we appreciate the cooperation from our hunting groups and individual hunters as we address this significant disease challenge,” Cornicelli said.</p>
<p>Cornicelli said meat and trophy handling already are part of the trip planning process so taking the additional steps to minimize CWD risk can be added to that process. Another item to consider is the mount itself.</p>
<p>“If you kill an animal you want to mount, you should make those arrangements in the destination state and have it caped before you leave,” Cornicelli said.</p>
<p>Alternatively, hunters can view a video at <a href="http://bit.ly/capeyourdeer">http://bit.ly/capeyourdeer</a> on how to cape a deer. The same technique can be used on elk or moose. The video also includes helpful information on the carcass importation ban.</p>
<p>Nonresidents transporting whole or partial carcasses on a direct route through Minnesota are exempt from this restriction.</p>
<p>Carcass import information is available at <a href="http://www.mndnr.gov/deerimports">mndnr.gov/deerimports</a>, in the 2017 Minnesota Hunting and Trapping Regulations Handbook on page 65 and the questions and answers section on the back cover.</p>
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		<title>Sharp-tailed grouse and prairie chicken hunters can send samples</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2017/09/11/sharp-tailed-grouse-and-prairie-chicken-hunters-can-send-samples-2/</link>
		<pubDate>Mon, 11 Sep 2017 18:34:51 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[stcarrol]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Hunting]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=19887</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[Sharp-tailed grouse and prairie chicken hunters can again this year voluntarily submit samples for study by the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. Ongoing DNR research is assessing prairie grouse exposure to chemicals called neonicotinoids. These are pesticides that, once applied, &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2017/09/11/sharp-tailed-grouse-and-prairie-chicken-hunters-can-send-samples-2/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Sharp-tailed grouse and prairie chicken hunters can again this year voluntarily submit samples for study by the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.<span id="more-19887"></span></p>
<p>Ongoing DNR research is assessing prairie grouse exposure to chemicals called neonicotinoids. These are pesticides that, once applied, can move throughout a plant. Neonicotinoids are commonly applied to seeds before planting.</p>
<p>“We’re into our third year of this study assessing whether prairie grouse have been exposed to neonicotinoids by eating treated seeds or other ways,” said Charlotte Roy, DNR grouse project leader.</p>
<p>Thus far, 89 percent of 46 sharp-tailed grouse livers and 67 percent of 27 greater prairie-chicken livers collected have tested positive for at least one neonicotinoid. This is the final year planned for hunter-harvested sample collection.</p>
<p>Hunters can voluntarily submit whole frozen liver, breast muscle tissue, or entire carcasses from harvested sharp-tailed grouse and prairie chickens in zip-close type bags, along with the location where the bird was harvested (GPS coordinates preferred). GPS locations and personal data will not be made public.</p>
<p>Samples should be stored frozen in a sealed plastic bag after harvest and dropped off at a local DNR wildlife office by appointment during regular business hours. Visit <a href="http://www.mndnr.gov/contact/locator.html">mndnr.gov/contact/locator.html </a>to find a local office.</p>
<p>Funding for the project is provided by the Minnesota Environment and Natural Resources Trust Fund as recommended by the Legislative-Citizen Commission on Minnesota Resources. More information about grouse hunting is available at <a href="http://www.mndnr.gov/hunting/grouse">mndnr.gov/hunting/grouse</a>.</p>
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