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	<title>MN Department of Natural Resources &#8212; News Releases</title>
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	<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us</link>
	<description>MN Department of Natural Resources -- News Releases</description>
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		<title>DNR continues aggressive starry stonewort management</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/05/16/dnr-continues-aggressive-starry-stonewort-management/</link>
		<pubDate>Thu, 16 May 2019 14:37:49 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Aquatic Invasive Species]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=21912</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[Agency, partner organizations, anglers and boaters working together to limit spread As the 2019 fishing and boating season gets underway, the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources is continuing and expanding a multi-faceted approach to combating the spread of starry stonewort, &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/05/16/dnr-continues-aggressive-starry-stonewort-management/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p><em>Agency, partner organizations, anglers and boaters working together to limit spread</em></p>
<p>As the 2019 fishing and boating season gets underway, the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources is continuing and expanding a multi-faceted approach to combating the spread of starry stonewort, an aquatic invasive species. <span id="more-21912"></span></p>
<p><img class="alignleft size-medium wp-image-21913" src="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/-4-300x169." alt="starry stonewort" width="300" height="169" srcset="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/-4-300x169. 300w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/-4-75x42. 75w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/-4-768x432. 768w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/-4-600x338. 600w" sizes="(max-width: 300px) 100vw, 300px" />The agency is issuing permits for pilot projects, working with local governments and lake associations, and partnering with researchers to limit starry stonewort in Minnesota after it was first confirmed in the state in 2015. This first confirmation was in Lake Koronis in Stearns County.</p>
<p>“Our main goals are to help prevent spread to other lakes, suppress starry stonewort in the 13 Minnesota lakes where it has been confirmed, reduce the recreational impacts and learn more about how we can control it,” said Heidi Wolf, DNR invasive species program supervisor.</p>
<p>Efforts include control of starry stonewort using hand removal, equipment, and copper herbicide treatments; evaluating the relative effectiveness of these methods; learning more about the biology of starry stonewort; working with lake associations and volunteer groups for early detection and monitoring; and educating boaters and anglers about how to prevent spreading starry stonewort and other invasive species. The DNR formed a starry stonewort guidance group in 2017 to review, permit and evaluate control projects.</p>
<p>Monitoring and research efforts have led to important new information:</p>
<ul>
<li>Starry stonewort may double or triple in size within two to three years in a lake, once it becomes well established.</li>
<li>Hand removal by divers in small, localized areas appears to be effective, if done carefully. Repeated hand-pulling efforts or follow-up copper treatments may be necessary. Similar to other invasive plants in Minnesota, starry stonewort requires management on an annual basis if suppression is the goal.</li>
<li>Repeat copper treatments can reduce abundance and slow spread in a given season. Most native plant communities have seen minimal impacts from copper treatments, though a native type of algae that looks similar to starry stonewort, Chara, has been damaged by treatments.</li>
</ul>
<p>The DNR’s partners in these efforts include the Minnesota Aquatic Invasive Species Research Center, the AIS Detectors group through University of Minnesota Extension, Minnesota Sea Grant, Wildlife Forever, lake associations and Minnesota counties with invasive species prevention programs.</p>
<p>Starry stonewort is an alga that looks similar to other native plants and can form dense mats, which can interfere with use of a lake and compete with native plants. It is most likely spread when fragments have not been properly cleaned from trailered boats, personal watercraft, docks, boat lifts, anchors or other water-related equipment.</p>
<p>The DNR reminds boaters and anglers to follow Minnesota laws to prevent the spread of aquatic invasive species:</p>
<ul>
<li><strong>Clean</strong> aquatic plants and animals from watercraft<strong>.</strong></li>
<li><strong>Drain</strong> all water by removing drain plugs and keep drain plugs out while transporting watercraft.</li>
<li><strong>Dispose</strong> of unwanted bait in the trash.</li>
</ul>
<p>Some invasive species are small and difficult to see at the access. To remove or kill them, take one or more of the following precautions before moving to another waterbody, especially after leaving infested waters:</p>
<ul>
<li>Spray with high-pressure water.</li>
<li>Rinse with very hot water (120 degrees for at least two minutes or 140 degrees for at least 10 seconds).</li>
<li>Dry for at least five days.</li>
</ul>
<p>Details about starry stonewort and other aquatic invasive species are available at <a href="http://links.govdelivery.com:80/track?type=click&amp;enid=ZWFzPTEmbWFpbGluZ2lkPTIwMTgwODMwLjk0MjcyMzYxJm1lc3NhZ2VpZD1NREItUFJELUJVTC0yMDE4MDgzMC45NDI3MjM2MSZkYXRhYmFzZWlkPTEwMDEmc2VyaWFsPTE3NTQyODc0JmVtYWlsaWQ9Z3JlZy5odXNha0BzdGF0ZS5tbi51cyZ1c2VyaWQ9Z3JlZy5odXNha0BzdGF0ZS5tbi51cyZmbD0mZXh0cmE9TXVsdGl2YXJpYXRlSWQ9JiYm&amp;&amp;&amp;101&amp;&amp;&amp;http://mndnr.gov/ais?utm_content=&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_name=&amp;utm_source=govdelivery&amp;utm_term=">mndnr.gov/ais</a>.</p>
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		<title>DNR Enforcement Division chief pilot calls it a career</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/05/13/dnr-enforcement-division-chief-pilot-calls-it-a-career/</link>
		<pubDate>Mon, 13 May 2019 17:21:35 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Enforcement]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=21906</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[Following a 15-year career with the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources Enforcement Division’s Aviation Unit, Capt. Tom Buker – the division’s chief pilot since 2015 – is flying off into retirement.  Like any retiree, he’s got the list of things &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/05/13/dnr-enforcement-division-chief-pilot-calls-it-a-career/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Following a 15-year career with the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources Enforcement Division’s Aviation Unit, Capt. Tom Buker – the division’s chief pilot since 2015 – is flying off into retirement. <span id="more-21906"></span></p>
<p>Like any retiree, he’s got the list of things he’s looking forward to doing, such as spending more time with family, traveling and being outdoors.</p>
<img class="size-medium wp-image-21907" src="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/-3-214x300." alt="" width="214" height="300" srcset="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/-3-214x300. 214w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/-3-54x75. 54w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/-3 357w" sizes="(max-width: 214px) 100vw, 214px" />
<p>But don’t mistake his excitement about beginning a new chapter in life for regret about how he’s spent the years since he was a military police officer in the Army.</p>
<p>“It’s been a fantastic career – are you kidding me?” said Buker, whose last day with the DNR is May 13. “I’m going to miss the people – whether the co-workers or the people we fly for – who are so dedicated to the mission. And I’m going to miss being able to fly the great aircraft the DNR has right now.”</p>
<p>As chief pilot, Buker was responsible for the Enforcement Division’s Aviation Unit, which has been around since the 1940s and includes nine pilots. The pilots fly enforcement missions to catch poachers and assist in search and rescue operations, for example, but they also spend time assisting other DNR divisions with tasks such as fish stocking and surveying the number of breeding waterfowl in the state.</p>
<p>From 2004 to 2015, Buker was an Enforcement pilot based in New Ulm. He’s also worked for sheriff’s offices in Nevada and Minnesota and been a flight instructor at the University of Minnesota Crookston.</p>
<p>As a kid growing up in Oregon, Buker spent lots of time fishing, hunting, trapping and nurturing his love for flight. His time as a DNR pilot has been a unique blend of all those interests and allowed him to experience the state’s landscape and wildlife in ways few others can. Sometimes, his abilities have been tested, like when he was participating in a moose project on the North Shore.</p>
<p>Following a flying session, he had to land at the airport in Grand Marais, where the winter weather presented a challenge when it came to landing. The airport manager and other people lined up their vehicles along the runway, telling Buker they were there in case of an emergency. He doesn’t necessarily believe that was the only reason everyone was gathered.</p>
<p>“I think they were there to watch the landing,” he said. “I had a whole crowd of people basically there to see if the DNR could get this plane down on an icy runway with a really stiff crosswind.”</p>
<p>Buker stuck the landing, as they say, adding another memory to the collection that encompasses what he says has been a rewarding career.</p>
<p>In retirement, Buker and his wife plan to build a home in Idaho so they can be closer to their children and grandchildren, who all live in the West. They’ll split their time between Idaho and Germany – where his wife grew up (they met during Buker’s Army days) – ensuring that even in retirement, he’ll still spend plenty of time in the air.</p>
<p>The Enforcement Division has hired Chris Lofstuen, who’s been a pilot with the DNR since 2013 and been flying since 1984, to fill the role of chief pilot. He begins Wednesday, May 15.</p>
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		<title>Fire danger high despite wet weather</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/05/13/fire-danger-high-despite-wet-weather/</link>
		<pubDate>Mon, 13 May 2019 17:18:52 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fire]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Forestry]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=21904</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[Despite this spring’s wet weather, much of Minnesota is still dry enough to fuel a dangerous wildfire, according to the Department of Natural Resources.  “It’s easy to think all of this rain has saturated the ground enough to prevent a &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/05/13/fire-danger-high-despite-wet-weather/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Despite this spring’s wet weather, much of Minnesota is still dry enough to fuel a dangerous wildfire, according to the Department of Natural Resources. <span id="more-21904"></span></p>
<p>“It’s easy to think all of this rain has saturated the ground enough to prevent a wildfire,” said Casey McCoy, the DNR’s fire prevention supervisor. “But even though the ground may be wet, the reality is grass, leaves, and pine needles dry surprisingly fast and become ideal fuel for a fire.”</p>
<p>Until foliage greens up, McCoy urges people not to burn debris piles. Escaped debris fires cause four of every 10 Minnesota wildfires each year. To prevent wildfires due to escaped debris burns, the DNR has issued burning restrictions in 44 counties. Always check the <a href="https://www.dnr.state.mn.us/forestry/fire/firerating_restrictions.html?utm_medium=email&amp;utm_source=govdelivery">DNR’s statewide fire danger and current burning restrictions web page</a> before burning.</p>
<p>If a debris fire, or any other fire, gets out of control, people should call 911 immediately. Grass fires can be deceptively fast, change direction suddenly, and be challenging to extinguish. Trained firefighting professionals would rather be called in to put out a fire safely than have someone get hurt or lose their life trying to extinguish it themselves.</p>
<p>In the end, prevention is key. People planning to have a campfire this spring should follow Smokey Bear’s safety rules:</p>
<ul>
<li>Keep flammable material 3 feet away from the fire.</li>
<li>Attend to the campfire at all times.</li>
<li>Have a handy source of water ready.</li>
<li>Stir the ashes and make certain the campfire is completely out before leaving.</li>
</ul>
<p>###</p>
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		<title>Waterville area fisheries crew complete yearly northern pike egg take</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/05/09/waterville-area-fisheries-crew-complete-yearly-northern-pike-egg-take/</link>
		<pubDate>Thu, 09 May 2019 18:15:31 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[stcarrol]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fish and Wildlife]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fishing]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=21901</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[Eggs produced at hatchery enhance fish populations in lakes statewide By Dan Ruiter, DNR southern region information officer As the sun came up over Le Sueur County’s Steele Lake, Peter Muggli and Sky Wigen slipped their boat into the frigid &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/05/09/waterville-area-fisheries-crew-complete-yearly-northern-pike-egg-take/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<h3><em><strong>Eggs produced at hatchery enhance fish populations in lakes statewide</strong></em></h3>
<h4><em>By Dan Ruiter, DNR southern region information officer</em></h4>
<p>As the sun came up over Le Sueur County’s Steele Lake, Peter Muggli and Sky Wigen slipped their boat into the frigid waters. Never mind that it was a Saturday, the Waterville area fisheries crew was on Mother Nature’s timeline – the ice was out and the northern pike spawn was imminent. They were just one of several teams fanning out across their work area.<span id="more-21901"></span></p>
<p>The duo worked together to pull up nets they had set just 24 hours earlier before sorting out the northern pike and placing them in the boat’s on-board tank. Those fish were headed to the Waterville State Fish Hatchery just a few miles away, where they would contribute to the DNR’s statewide stocking program, which is especially critical in the shallow lakes of southern Minnesota according to fisheries biologists.</p>
<p>“Northern pike require shallow areas with vegetation for natural reproduction,” said Waterville area fisheries supervisor Craig Soupir. “This type of habitat has disappeared over the years on many of our lakes.”</p>
<p>After all of the nets have been pulled from Steele Lake and the northern pike placed in the tank, Muggli and Wigen load up the boat and drive through the muddy and rutted gravel roads between that lake and the fish hatchery.</p>
<p>They are the first crew back, but before long, the other crews pull in and the place becomes abuzz with activity. An assembly line of sorts comes together as fisheries staff go through the task of stripping eggs and milt before combining them and activating them with water, beginning the process of producing young fish.</p>
<p>The Waterville hatchery is just one of 15 hatcheries in the state. In Waterville alone, 40 million walleye fry are produced each year, and another 1.5 million northern pike are hatched each year. Muskellunge was added in the last decade, and 300,000 muskies are hatched annually at the facility.</p>
<p>Following the fertilization process, the hatchery’s rearing ponds are the next stage in producing fish for the DNR’s stocking efforts. Waterville’s 50 acres of rearing ponds produce 225,000 walleye fingerlings, 70,000 muskellunge fingerlings and 20,000 catfish fingerlings. Those fish, depending on the species, can range from 1 to 12 inches.</p>
<p>It’s all in a day’s work for the Waterville fisheries crew. They’re proud of their role in the area’s angling fortunes.</p>
<p>&nbsp;</p>
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		<title>ATV riders can explore Minnesota trails for free June 7-9</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/05/09/atv-riders-can-explore-minnesota-trails-for-free-june-7-9/</link>
		<pubDate>Thu, 09 May 2019 18:10:25 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[stcarrol]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Trails]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=21899</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[Minnesotans with an all-terrain vehicle registered for private or agricultural use won’t need to pay the additional registration fee ($53.50 for three years) to ride the state’s public ATV trails, Friday through Sunday, June 7-9. Out-of-state riders can explore Minnesota &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/05/09/atv-riders-can-explore-minnesota-trails-for-free-june-7-9/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Minnesotans with an all-terrain vehicle registered for private or agricultural use won’t need to pay the additional registration fee ($53.50 for three years) to ride the state’s public ATV trails, Friday through Sunday, June 7-9. Out-of-state riders can explore Minnesota ATV trails that weekend as well, without the need for a nonresident trail pass ($21 annually).<span id="more-21899"></span></p>
<p>“We see this weekend as a great opportunity to showcase the wide variety of state and grant-in-aid trails across Minnesota,” said Erika Rivers, DNR Parks and Trails Division director. “There are many privately registered ATVs across the state that, during this weekend, can give the public trails a try for free.”</p>
<p>This is the fourth year that Minnesota is providing ATV riders with free access to more than 3,000 miles of state forest and grant-in-aid (GIA) trails during “No Registration Weekend.” The event falls on the second weekend in June each year.</p>
<p>Some places to explore include:</p>
<ul>
<li>The Iron Range Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) State Recreation Area. This 1,200-acre OHV park in Gilbert has 36 miles of scenic trails for riders of all abilities.</li>
<li>The 100-mile trail system in Nemadji State Forest in Pine County, which connects to the Matthew Lourey State Trail and the Gandy Dancer Trail for more riding opportunities. Gafvert Campground offers first-come, first-served camping.</li>
<li>The 29-mile Spider Lake trail system in Foot Hills State Forest, Cass County, where riders will curve around lakes and ponds, go up and down a variety of hills, and view overlooks from the ridges throughout the forest.</li>
<li>The 200-mile Northwoods Regional Trail System in Aitkin and Itasca counties, where riders will use the Soo Line Trail to connect to great communities and trail loops.</li>
<li>For more information about these and many other trails, check out <a href="http://links.govdelivery.com/track?type=click&amp;enid=ZWFzPTEmbWFpbGluZ2lkPTIwMTkwNTA5LjU2OTc5MzEmbWVzc2FnZWlkPU1EQi1QUkQtQlVMLTIwMTkwNTA5LjU2OTc5MzEmZGF0YWJhc2VpZD0xMDAxJnNlcmlhbD0xNzYxMDk5MSZlbWFpbGlkPXN0ZXZlLmNhcnJvbGxAc3RhdGUubW4udXMmdXNlcmlkPXN0ZXZlLmNhcnJvbGxAc3RhdGUubW4udXMmZmw9JmV4dHJhPU11bHRpdmFyaWF0ZUlkPSYmJg==&amp;&amp;&amp;100&amp;&amp;&amp;http://www.mndnr.gov/ohv?utm_medium=email&amp;utm_source=govdelivery">www.mndnr.gov/ohv</a>.</li>
</ul>
<p>Always put safety first when out on the trails. Safety training is recommended for everyone who operates an ATV. It is required for ATV riders born after July 1, 1987. Anyone under age 18 must wear a DOT certified helmet while driving or riding an ATV.</p>
<p>Kids 16 and under must fit the ATV they are operating and be able to properly reach and control the handlebars and reach the foot pegs while sitting upright on the ATV.</p>
<p>Trail maps, updates on trail conditions, Youth ATV Safety training, full OHV regulations, and other OHV information can be found online at <a href="http://links.govdelivery.com/track?type=click&amp;enid=ZWFzPTEmbWFpbGluZ2lkPTIwMTkwNTA5LjU2OTc5MzEmbWVzc2FnZWlkPU1EQi1QUkQtQlVMLTIwMTkwNTA5LjU2OTc5MzEmZGF0YWJhc2VpZD0xMDAxJnNlcmlhbD0xNzYxMDk5MSZlbWFpbGlkPXN0ZXZlLmNhcnJvbGxAc3RhdGUubW4udXMmdXNlcmlkPXN0ZXZlLmNhcnJvbGxAc3RhdGUubW4udXMmZmw9JmV4dHJhPU11bHRpdmFyaWF0ZUlkPSYmJg==&amp;&amp;&amp;101&amp;&amp;&amp;http://www.mndnr.gov/ohv?utm_medium=email&amp;utm_source=govdelivery">www.mndnr.gov/ohv</a>.</p>
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		<title>St. Louis River estuary restoration project open house is May 21</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/05/06/st-louis-river-estuary-restoration-project-open-house-is-may-21/</link>
		<pubDate>Mon, 06 May 2019 18:24:52 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[stcarrol]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=21890</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[Construction on wetland habitat restoration project expected to begin in June Work on an extensive habitat restoration project will take place this summer in the St. Louis River estuary, where the river enters Lake Superior. Staff from the Minnesota Department &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/05/06/st-louis-river-estuary-restoration-project-open-house-is-may-21/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<h3><em><b><span style="color: black; font-family: 'Calibri',sans-serif;">Construction on wetland habitat restoration project expected to begin in June</span></b></em></h3>
<p>Work on an extensive habitat restoration project will take place this summer in the St. Louis River estuary, where the river enters Lake Superior.</p>
<p>Staff from the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources will host a public open house in May to share information and answer questions about the Kingsbury Bay/Grassy Point habitat restoration project.<span id="more-21890"></span></p>
<p>The two-part project will restore 240 acres of coastal wetland habitat in the upper St. Louis River estuary, a wetland complex between Duluth and Superior, Wisconsin. The Kingsbury Bay and Grassy Point project areas were identified in 2013 as two of 17 sites located in the St. Louis River Area of Concern (AOC) in need of habitat restoration. Construction is expected to begin in June.</p>
<p>“The two projects could be done separately, but treating them as one large project creates efficiency in construction, allows us to reuse excavated soil and materials, and ultimately reduces the impacts for nearby neighborhoods,” said DNR St. Louis River project coordinator Melissa Sjolund. “Together, they make one of the largest habitat restoration projects in DNR’s history.”</p>
<p>Three habitat restoration projects have already been completed in the St. Louis River AOC by the DNR and partner agencies. Restoring Kingsbury Bay and Grassy Point will bring the St. Louis River AOC one step closer to removal from the binational list of most impaired regions on the Great Lakes.</p>
<p>The open house will be held Tuesday, May 21 from 5 to 7 p.m. at the City Center West Community Center/Evergreen Senior Center at 5830 Grand Ave., Duluth.<br />
A presentation scheduled for 5:30 p.m. will include an overview of the project, anticipated construction timelines, logistics and neighborhood impacts. Anyone with an interest is invited to attend and ask questions</p>
<p>Restoration of Grassy Point requires the removal of 177,000 yards of wood waste that was deposited into the river from two historic mills that were built on stilts over the water. The mills are no longer at the site, but the wood debris – up to 16 feet deep in locations – remains 120 years later and continues to impair fish and invertebrate habitat. The site restoration includes removing invasive narrow-leaved cattails and creating a new isthmus of land to shelter the restored wetland from wave action.</p>
<p>A mile and a half upstream, the Kingsbury Bay project will include the removal of 173,000 yards of excess sediment deposited there by upstream erosion and a 2012 flash flood. The project will restore coastal wetland habitat, create open water, and improve recreation for boaters and anglers. The clean sediment removed from Kingsbury Bay will be reused at Grassy Point to cap areas of wood waste that are not feasible to remove, create upland habitat islands with native trees and plantings, and reestablish healthy aquatic plant and wildlife communities.</p>
<p>Funding for the $15 million project comes from the Minnesota Outdoor Heritage Fund, the federal Great Lakes Restoration Initiative with oversight by the U.S. Environmental Protection, and the St. Louis River/Interlake/Duluth Tar Superfund Site settlement.</p>
<p>Anyone interested in receiving project and construction updates should visit <a href="https://www.dnr.state.mn.us/st-louis-river-restoration/index.html">St. Louis River Restoration Initiative webpage.</a></p>
<p>&nbsp;</p>
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		<title>DNR crews working hard to have boat ramps and docks ready by fishing opener</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/05/06/dnr-crews-working-hard-to-have-boat-ramps-and-docks-ready-by-fishing-opener/</link>
		<pubDate>Mon, 06 May 2019 18:19:30 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[stcarrol]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fishing]]></category>
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		<category><![CDATA[Opener]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=21888</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[Crews with the Department of Natural Resources are confident they will have the majority of DNR public water accesses ready in time for the May 11 fishing opener. &#8220;DNR crews statewide are making good progress preparing public water accesses for &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/05/06/dnr-crews-working-hard-to-have-boat-ramps-and-docks-ready-by-fishing-opener/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Crews with the Department of Natural Resources are confident they will have the majority of DNR public water accesses ready in time for the May 11 fishing opener.<span id="more-21888"></span></p>
<p>&#8220;DNR crews statewide are making good progress preparing public water accesses for the upcoming fishing season,” said Nancy Stewart, the DNR’s water recreation program consultant. “Once the ice is off, they inspect boat ramps, repair them if needed, and put the docks in the water.”</p>
<p>There are about 3,000 public water access sites statewide, and the DNR’s Parks and Trails Division manages about half of them. “Boaters will find good launch conditions at most public accesses for the fishing opener,” Stewart said.</p>
<p>Access facilities on some rivers may not be usable due to high water or flood damage, and on the larger northern lakes if ice persists.</p>
<p>Stewart offers these suggestions for a safe and successful fishing opener:</p>
<ul>
<li>Call ahead to get the latest report on the lake and access you intend to use.</li>
<li>From shore or dock, inspect the ramp above and below the water to ensure it is in good condition.</li>
<li>Wear a life jacket when inspecting an access while in the water.</li>
<li>Have a plan B – if a particular fishing opener lake access is unusable, try another public water access.</li>
</ul>
<p>There are helpful resources on the <a href="https://www.dnr.state.mn.us/water_access/index.html?utm_medium=email&amp;utm_source=govdelivery">DNR’s public water access website.</a></p>
<p>Boaters and anglers can also get questions answered by calling the DNR Information Center: 888-646-6367 (8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday-Friday, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday).</p>
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		<title>Public invited to tour Waterville State Fish Hatchery</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/05/06/public-invited-to-tour-waterville-state-fish-hatchery/</link>
		<pubDate>Mon, 06 May 2019 18:14:37 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[stcarrol]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fishing]]></category>
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		<category><![CDATA[Opener]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=21886</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[Open house scheduled for afternoon of May 9 The Department of Natural Resources invites the public to tour the Waterville State Fish Hatchery ahead of the Minnesota Governor’s Fishing Opener. The open house will take place Thursday, May 9 from &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/05/06/public-invited-to-tour-waterville-state-fish-hatchery/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<h3><em><b><span style="color: black; font-family: 'Calibri',sans-serif;">Open house scheduled for afternoon of May 9</span></b></em></h3>
<p>The Department of Natural Resources invites the public to tour the Waterville State Fish Hatchery ahead of the Minnesota Governor’s Fishing Opener.</p>
<p>The open house will take place Thursday, May 9 from 1 p.m. until 4 p.m. at the hatchery located at 50317 Fish Hatchery Road in Waterville.<br />
<span id="more-21886"></span><br />
Staff will give tours of the facility and show incubating fish eggs and young fish at various growth stages. There will also be displays that feature sampling gear, nets, work boats and a live fish display. Attendees can also learn about the process of raising fish, from the netting of spawning fish to the rearing ponds.</p>
<a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/-2"><img class="size-large wp-image-21883" src="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/-2-600x342." alt="" width="600" height="342" srcset="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/-2-600x342. 600w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/-2-75x43. 75w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/-2-300x171. 300w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/-2-768x438. 768w" sizes="(max-width: 600px) 100vw, 600px" /></a>
<p>“We are looking forward to having people come visit and experience the hatchery,” said Waterville area fisheries supervisor Craig Soupir. “Whether someone is an angler or not, there is always something interesting to see and learn.</p>
<p>“We produce several different fish species and various sizes of fish,” said Soupir. “Visitors will get to see some of those fish rearing activities first hand and we hope people will ask lots of questions so that we can make their visit a memorable and personal experience.”</p>
<p>Snacks and refreshments will be available for guests.</p>
<p>Opened in 1954, the hatchery is the state’s largest cool water facility. It incubates and raises various sizes of walleye, northern pike, muskellunge and channel catfish for the state’s fish stocking program.</p>
<p>Each year at Waterville, a total of 40 million walleye fry, 1.5 million northern pike fry, and 300,000 muskellunge fry are hatched. Larger sizes of fish raised at Waterville include 200,000 walleye small fingerlings (1 &#8211; 2 inch), 25,000 walleye large fingerlings (3 &#8211; 6 inch), 60,000 muskellunge small fingerlings (3 &#8211; 4 inch), 10,000 muskellunge large fingerlings (10 &#8211; 12 inch), and 20,000 catfish fingerlings (3 &#8211; 4 inch).</p>
<p>The DNR’s hatchery program is critical to our fisheries, especially in southern Minnesota. Without the hatcheries, many southern Minnesota lakes would be without the walleye and northern pike species that so many anglers prize.</p>
<p>The hatchery is located 2 miles west of Waterville off of Le Sueur County Road 14 at 50317 Fish Hatchery Road. For more information on the <a href="http://mndnr.gov/areas/fisheries/waterville/index.html">Waterville area fisheries office</a>, or call the office during regular business hours at 507-362-4223.</p>
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		<title>DNR to appeal court&#8217;s ruling about naming of Bde Maka Ska</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/05/01/dnr-to-appeal-courts-ruling-about-naming-of-bde-maka-ska/</link>
		<pubDate>Wed, 01 May 2019 14:32:33 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=21878</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources has announced that it will appeal the Minnesota Court of Appeal’s recent decision regarding the naming of Bde Maka Ska in Minneapolis. The DNR will submit its petition for review to the Minnesota Supreme &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/05/01/dnr-to-appeal-courts-ruling-about-naming-of-bde-maka-ska/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources has announced that it will appeal the Minnesota Court of Appeal’s recent decision regarding the naming of Bde Maka Ska in Minneapolis. The DNR will submit its petition for review to the Minnesota Supreme Court by May 29. <span id="more-21878"></span></p>
<p>According to Minnesota DNR Commissioner Sarah Strommen, “DNR is very concerned with the implications of the Appeals Court’s ruling for our ability to work with county boards to reflect community standards in how the state’s waters are named. We have long worked with counties in eliminating offensive or derogatory names.”</p>
<p>“We are also concerned with another aspect of the Appeals Court’s decision. Specifically, it opens the door for people to challenge a range of final agency decisions well after established appeals periods. This presents the potential for considerable disruption in the normal order of government decision making.”</p>
<p>In its ruling Monday, the Minnesota Court of Appeals reversed DNR’s January 2018 approval of Hennepin County’s request to rename Lake Calhoun as Bde Maka Ska. DNR based its approval on the longstanding understanding of its authority under relevant state statute, the fact that Bde Maka Ska meets all state naming criteria, and the fact that Hennepin County met all public process and other procedural requirements in asking DNR to approve the name change request.</p>
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		<title>Drinking water restored at Blue Mounds State Park</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/04/29/drinking-water-restored-at-blue-mounds-state-park/</link>
		<pubDate>Mon, 29 Apr 2019 15:52:30 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
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		<category><![CDATA[State Parks]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=21874</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[Water that’s safe to drink, cook, and bathe with is now available for visitors at Blue Mounds State Park in southwestern Minnesota, according to the Department of Natural Resources. Over the winter, contractors made the final connections to Rock County &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/04/29/drinking-water-restored-at-blue-mounds-state-park/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Water that’s safe to drink, cook, and bathe with is now available for visitors at Blue Mounds State Park in southwestern Minnesota, according to the Department of Natural Resources. Over the winter, contractors made the final connections to Rock County Rural Water System, ending a safe drinking water problem that spanned five camping seasons.<span id="more-21874"></span></p>
<p><img class="alignleft size-medium wp-image-21875" src="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/-8-300x235." alt="" width="300" height="235" srcset="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/-8-300x235. 300w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/-8-75x59. 75w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/-8-768x601. 768w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/-8-600x469. 600w" sizes="(max-width: 300px) 100vw, 300px" />“We’re excited to have water service restored,” said Blue Mounds State Park manager Chris Ingebretsen. “We appreciate the patience shown by our visitors, and look forward to welcoming them for the 2019 camping season.”</p>
<p>Water service was first disrupted at Blue Mounds State Park in 2014 when E.coli bacteria was discovered in the park’s well. A second well was dug that year, but it also contained E.coli. That meant the park needed to look elsewhere for a water source.</p>
<p>“This was a fairly complex project,” Ingebretsen said. “The Sioux quartzite rock that underlies the park makes Blue Mounds unique and special, but it’s also the very thing that complicated the project since contractors needed to drill and blast through so much bedrock to bring in underground water lines.”</p>
<p>After a summer of working to connect water service to the park, the connection was finally completed in December, and system testing on the project’s first segment concluded in mid-February. Testing on water lines to the campground concluded late last week, giving the all-clear for water service ahead of the 2019 camping season.</p>
<p>“We’re especially grateful for the hospitality from the city of Luverne and the Luverne Area Aquatic and Fitness Center,” Ingebretsen said. “By cooperating to provide shower facilities for our park guests, they ensured campers were still able to have a good experience these past five camping seasons.”</p>
<p>Founded in 1937, Blue Mounds State Park is home to a spectacular 1.5 mile rock cliff outcrop, numerous native prairie grasses and flowers, as well as Minnesota’s first state-owned herd of bison. In 2018, the Park began to offer bison and prairie tours with a DNR naturalist on a specially-designed vehicle funded through the <a href="http://links.govdelivery.com:80/track?type=click&amp;enid=ZWFzPTEmbWFpbGluZ2lkPTIwMTkwNDI5LjUyNzE0MjEmbWVzc2FnZWlkPU1EQi1QUkQtQlVMLTIwMTkwNDI5LjUyNzE0MjEmZGF0YWJhc2VpZD0xMDAxJnNlcmlhbD0xNzYwNzg5MSZlbWFpbGlkPWp1bGllLmZvcnN0ZXJAc3RhdGUubW4udXMmdXNlcmlkPWp1bGllLmZvcnN0ZXJAc3RhdGUubW4udXMmZmw9JmV4dHJhPU11bHRpdmFyaWF0ZUlkPSYmJg==&amp;&amp;&amp;103&amp;&amp;&amp;https://www.legacy.mn.gov/parks-trails-fund?utm_medium=email&amp;utm_source=govdelivery">State of Minnesota’s Legacy Funds</a>.</p>
<p>Camping is available via the DNR’s reservation system, at <a href="http://links.govdelivery.com:80/track?type=click&amp;enid=ZWFzPTEmbWFpbGluZ2lkPTIwMTkwNDI5LjUyNzE0MjEmbWVzc2FnZWlkPU1EQi1QUkQtQlVMLTIwMTkwNDI5LjUyNzE0MjEmZGF0YWJhc2VpZD0xMDAxJnNlcmlhbD0xNzYwNzg5MSZlbWFpbGlkPWp1bGllLmZvcnN0ZXJAc3RhdGUubW4udXMmdXNlcmlkPWp1bGllLmZvcnN0ZXJAc3RhdGUubW4udXMmZmw9JmV4dHJhPU11bHRpdmFyaWF0ZUlkPSYmJg==&amp;&amp;&amp;104&amp;&amp;&amp;https://reservemn.usedirect.com/MinnesotaWeb/?utm_medium=email&amp;utm_source=govdelivery">mndnr.gov</a>. A vehicle permit is required to enter all Minnesota state parks, which cost $7/day or $35/year.  Other important tour park information can be found at <a href="http://links.govdelivery.com:80/track?type=click&amp;enid=ZWFzPTEmbWFpbGluZ2lkPTIwMTkwNDI5LjUyNzE0MjEmbWVzc2FnZWlkPU1EQi1QUkQtQlVMLTIwMTkwNDI5LjUyNzE0MjEmZGF0YWJhc2VpZD0xMDAxJnNlcmlhbD0xNzYwNzg5MSZlbWFpbGlkPWp1bGllLmZvcnN0ZXJAc3RhdGUubW4udXMmdXNlcmlkPWp1bGllLmZvcnN0ZXJAc3RhdGUubW4udXMmZmw9JmV4dHJhPU11bHRpdmFyaWF0ZUlkPSYmJg==&amp;&amp;&amp;105&amp;&amp;&amp;http://mndnr.gov/bluemounds?utm_medium=email&amp;utm_source=govdelivery">mndnr.gov/bluemounds</a>.</p>
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		<title>As sunfish bite heats up, anglers encouraged to eat small fish</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/04/29/as-sunfish-bite-heats-up-anglers-encouraged-to-eat-small-fish/</link>
		<pubDate>Mon, 29 Apr 2019 15:47:00 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fish and Wildlife]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fisheries]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fishing]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Opener]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=21871</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[Anglers can find nutritious, plentiful sunfish in all areas of the state   Feeling that tug on the line, an angler sets the hook and reels in a small sunfish, then asks the perennial question: Should I keep it?  Sunfish, also &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/04/29/as-sunfish-bite-heats-up-anglers-encouraged-to-eat-small-fish/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p><em>Anglers can find nutritious, plentiful sunfish in all areas of the state  </em></p>
<p>Feeling that tug on the line, an angler sets the hook and reels in a small sunfish, then asks the perennial question: Should I keep it? <span id="more-21871"></span></p>
<p><img class="alignleft size-medium wp-image-21872" src="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/-7-300x225." alt="" width="300" height="225" srcset="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/-7-300x225. 300w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/-7-75x56. 75w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/-7-768x576. 768w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/-7-600x450. 600w" sizes="(max-width: 300px) 100vw, 300px" />Sunfish, also known as bluegills and pumpkinseeds, are a go-to species for anglers looking for a meal and many anglers may be surprised to know they’re actually encouraged to keep small ones up to the limit set by the Department of Natural Resources. These fish are nutritious and safe to eat regularly, according to consumption guidelines from the Department of Health.</p>
<p>“We encourage anglers to keep sunfish under 7 inches and consider releasing the ones 9 inches or larger,” said Jon Hansen, fisheries management consultant. “This is opposite what many anglers grew up hearing but it’s good news for anyone who wants high odds of bringing home a meal of local, healthy food.”</p>
<p>Small sunfish are plentiful and easier to catch than large ones. Keeping small ones has little impact on populations. In contrast, when anglers keep only the large sunfish, which are usually males guarding nests, the small males remaining in the population don’t have any need to compete with larger males to spawn and instead of growing, they devote their energy to spawning at younger ages.</p>
<p>After ice-out, sunfish move into shallow, warmer water to eat and later spawn. After spawning they can be found loitering near aquatic plants, or near docks. Sunfish can be caught readily throughout the state and seasons are open all year.</p>
<p>Fish are a good source of protein. For pregnant women, fish contain healthy fats that are important for a developing fetus and eating fish can lower the risk of heart disease.</p>
<p>A person can’t always tell if fish are safe to eat by looking at them, or even by how clean the water appears. The Minnesota Department of Health helps bridge this information gap by providing fish consumption guidelines based on fish species, waterbody, and exposure risk for different types of people. In general, sunfish have lower levels of mercury than other fish; however fish from some waters have other contaminants that impact the guidelines.</p>
<p>For sunfish, statewide guidelines are one meal per week for women who are or may become pregnant and children under 15, and the guidelines don’t advise any limit to the number of sunfish meals others should eat.</p>
<p>Anglers should check for site-specific advice that pertains to the water they’re fishing. If eating fish from a variety of waters or a specific water isn’t listed, anglers should follow the statewide guidelines. Both site-specific and statewide guidance on eating fish can be found at <a href="http://links.govdelivery.com:80/track?type=click&amp;enid=ZWFzPTEmbWFpbGluZ2lkPTIwMTkwNDI5LjUyNzE0MjEmbWVzc2FnZWlkPU1EQi1QUkQtQlVMLTIwMTkwNDI5LjUyNzE0MjEmZGF0YWJhc2VpZD0xMDAxJnNlcmlhbD0xNzYwNzg5MSZlbWFpbGlkPWp1bGllLmZvcnN0ZXJAc3RhdGUubW4udXMmdXNlcmlkPWp1bGllLmZvcnN0ZXJAc3RhdGUubW4udXMmZmw9JmV4dHJhPU11bHRpdmFyaWF0ZUlkPSYmJg==&amp;&amp;&amp;100&amp;&amp;&amp;http://bit.ly/FishConsumptionGuidanceMN?utm_medium=email&amp;utm_source=govdelivery">bit.ly/FishConsumptionGuidanceMN</a>.</p>
<p>The site <a href="http://links.govdelivery.com:80/track?type=click&amp;enid=ZWFzPTEmbWFpbGluZ2lkPTIwMTkwNDI5LjUyNzE0MjEmbWVzc2FnZWlkPU1EQi1QUkQtQlVMLTIwMTkwNDI5LjUyNzE0MjEmZGF0YWJhc2VpZD0xMDAxJnNlcmlhbD0xNzYwNzg5MSZlbWFpbGlkPWp1bGllLmZvcnN0ZXJAc3RhdGUubW4udXMmdXNlcmlkPWp1bGllLmZvcnN0ZXJAc3RhdGUubW4udXMmZmw9JmV4dHJhPU11bHRpdmFyaWF0ZUlkPSYmJg==&amp;&amp;&amp;101&amp;&amp;&amp;https://www.chooseyourfish.org/fish/?utm_medium=email&amp;utm_source=govdelivery">ChooseYourFish.org</a> is another source for statewide consumption guidelines and has recipes and some cooking videos – including recipes for bluegill chowder and perch skillet.</p>
<p>Minnesota is home to a variety of fish in addition to sunfish that anglers can harvest and enjoy eating, including popular species like crappie, northern pike, walleye, catfish and bass. Anglers can find fish consumption advice for lakes, angling information, lake survey reports and more on the DNR LakeFinder at <a href="http://links.govdelivery.com:80/track?type=click&amp;enid=ZWFzPTEmbWFpbGluZ2lkPTIwMTkwNDI5LjUyNzE0MjEmbWVzc2FnZWlkPU1EQi1QUkQtQlVMLTIwMTkwNDI5LjUyNzE0MjEmZGF0YWJhc2VpZD0xMDAxJnNlcmlhbD0xNzYwNzg5MSZlbWFpbGlkPWp1bGllLmZvcnN0ZXJAc3RhdGUubW4udXMmdXNlcmlkPWp1bGllLmZvcnN0ZXJAc3RhdGUubW4udXMmZmw9JmV4dHJhPU11bHRpdmFyaWF0ZUlkPSYmJg==&amp;&amp;&amp;102&amp;&amp;&amp;http://www.mndnr.gov/lakefinder?utm_medium=email&amp;utm_source=govdelivery">mndnr.gov/lakefinder</a>.</p>
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		<title>Washington County Groundwater Atlas now available</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/04/26/washington-county-groundwater-atlas-now-available/</link>
		<pubDate>Fri, 26 Apr 2019 17:01:29 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=21869</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources has published the Washington County Groundwater Atlas. This Part B atlas covers groundwater conditions and sensitivity to pollution. It expands on Part A, the geology atlas previously published by the Minnesota Geological Survey.  The &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/04/26/washington-county-groundwater-atlas-now-available/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources has published the Washington County Groundwater Atlas. This Part B atlas covers groundwater conditions and sensitivity to pollution. It expands on Part A, the geology atlas previously published by the Minnesota Geological Survey. <span id="more-21869"></span></p>
<p>The atlas can be used to help identify viable water sources, evaluate supply, identify recharge sources and flow, manage sustainability, guide decisions for well and septic system construction, assist in wellhead protection for public water supply and assess pollution sensitivity.</p>
<p>The atlas is available online and in printed form:</p>
<ul>
<li><strong>Online</strong>: <a href="https://www.dnr.state.mn.us/waters/programs/gw_section/mapping/platesum/washcga.html?utm_medium=email&amp;utm_source=govdelivery">Washington County Groundwater Atlas</a>. The webpage includes GIS files and PDFs of the report and maps. The GIS folder includes GIS files and associated metadata, as well as an ArcMap file that displays the data as shown on the published maps and includes hyperlinks to image files of the published cross sections. For Part A and other completed counties consult the <a href="https://www.dnr.state.mn.us/waters/groundwater_section/mapping/status.html?utm_medium=email&amp;utm_source=govdelivery">County Atlas Status List</a>.</li>
<li><strong>Paper copies</strong>: The geology and groundwater atlases can be purchased from <a href="https://gcc01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.mngs.umn.edu%2Fmapsales.html%3Futm_medium%3Demail%26utm_source%3Dgovdelivery&amp;data=02%7C01%7CJulie.Forster%40state.mn.us%7C50fc85263d3742d9afe608d6ca67e105%7Ceb14b04624c445198f26b89c2159828c%7C0%7C0%7C636918944849056586&amp;sdata=JxvEPdpPZ3dA767vWuZmrsxf%2Blb7dqSyPMr2%2BbaE5HM%3D&amp;reserved=0">Minnesota Geological Survey Map Sales</a>, 612-626-2969. Prices for each atlas package range from $12–$15.</li>
</ul>
<p>Partial funding for this project was provided by the Minnesota Environment and Natural Resources Trust Fund and the Clean Water Fund. For more information on the program, visit the County Groundwater Atlas website at <a href="http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/waters/groundwater_section/mapping/atlases.html?utm_content=&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_name=&amp;utm_source=govdelivery&amp;utm_term=">mndnr.gov/groundwatermapping</a>.</p>
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		<title>Bear shot in North St. Paul</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/04/25/bear-shot-in-north-st-paul/</link>
		<pubDate>Thu, 25 Apr 2019 21:10:25 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Bear]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fish and Wildlife]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Wildlife]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=21866</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[A bear in a residential area of North St. Paul was shot and killed today by a Department of Natural Resources conservation officer as authorities determined the animal posed an immediate safety threat.  The bear was a male and estimated &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/04/25/bear-shot-in-north-st-paul/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>A bear in a residential area of North St. Paul was shot and killed today by a Department of Natural Resources conservation officer as authorities determined the animal posed an immediate safety threat. <span id="more-21866"></span></p>
<p>The bear was a male and estimated as a two-year old, about 110 – 120 pounds. The bear carcass will be processed and the meat will be distributed to people in need of food.</p>
<p>Due to the density of residences and roads in this area, it was unlikely that the bear would have been able to escape to more suitable habitat, especially during daylight hours and during the morning rush hour.</p>
<p>Growing interest in the bear’s location was leading to a gathering of onlookers. Bears can become agitated and pose a danger to humans when they become trapped or cornered as this bear had become in the neighborhood tree.</p>
<p>Law enforcement is authorized to dispatch bears in the metro area if they pose a public safety threat. The DNR does not tranquilize or relocate bears. Relocated bears seldom remain where they are released. They may return to where they were caught or become a problem somewhere else.</p>
<p>It is not unusual for people to see bears in the spring as young males search out new territories. They are also are looking for food sources at a time when berries and vegetation are scarce.</p>
<p>If people encounter a bear, the first thing they should do is back away slowly. They need to give the bear an escape route and make noise to scare the bear away.</p>
<p>People should also clean-up and remove potential attractants such as bird feeders, garbage, and compost bins to reduce the chances of bears moving into developed and residential areas.</p>
<p>Bear sightings outside of their primary northern forest range can be reported on an interactive map-based application on the Minnesota DNR website at <a href="https://www.dnr.state.mn.us/hunting/bear/bear-sightings.html?utm_medium=email&amp;utm_source=govdelivery">mndnr.gov/hunting/bear/bear-sightings.html</a>.</p>
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		<title>DNR provides links for webinars about Enbridge Line 3 license and permit applications</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/04/25/dnr-provides-links-for-webinars-about-enbridge-line-3-license-and-permit-applications/</link>
		<pubDate>Thu, 25 Apr 2019 16:44:55 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=21863</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[Webinars will provide information on project and how to comment The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources is announcing details on how to join upcoming webinars about Enbridge’s Line 3 pipeline replacement project. On the day of each event, links to &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/04/25/dnr-provides-links-for-webinars-about-enbridge-line-3-license-and-permit-applications/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p><em>Webinars will provide information on project and how to comment</em></p>
<p>The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources is announcing details on how to join upcoming webinars about Enbridge’s Line 3 pipeline replacement project. On the day of each event, links to access the webinar will be available via the DNR Line 3 webpage, <a href="https://gcc01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=mndnr.gov%2Fline3&amp;data=02%7C01%7Cjulie.forster%40state.mn.us%7C52aa773ff50147ada50608d6c99a1707%7Ceb14b04624c445198f26b89c2159828c%7C0%7C0%7C636918060982525851&amp;sdata=lypR%2BzZ5VYYywp8pek7agluCxMe9aPtAqF4KnOy33sg%3D&amp;reserved=0">mndnr.gov/line3</a>. <span id="more-21863"></span></p>
<p>The links will be available 30 minutes before each webinar starts. The webinars will be held Monday, April 29 starting at 2:30 p.m., Tuesday, April 30 starting at 10 a.m., and Monday, May 6 starting at 3 p.m. They will focus on the project, how people can comment on the company’s applications, and the DNR’s decision-making process.</p>
<p>The first webinar on April 29 will provide an overview of the Line 3 replacement project and the DNR’s role in regulating the project. Webinars 2 (April 30) and 3 (May 6) will focus in more detail on the 10 applications Enbridge has submitted to the DNR. The content of webinars 2 and 3 will be essentially the same.</p>
<p>Following an informational presentation, each webinar will include a 30-minute question and answer period. This will be an opportunity for participants to submit questions about the project, the applications, and the DNR’s review process. The DNR will not be taking public comments as part of the webinars. (See below for details on how comments may be submitted.) The DNR will answer as many questions as possible in the 30-minute period.</p>
<p>Minnesotans will be able to view the webinars using their own computers and other devices, or at one of three locations in northern Minnesota. These viewing locations are in Park Rapids, Clearbrook, and Floodwood. Further details on these locations are provided at <a href="https://gcc01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=mndnr.gov%2Fline3&amp;data=02%7C01%7Cjulie.forster%40state.mn.us%7C52aa773ff50147ada50608d6c99a1707%7Ceb14b04624c445198f26b89c2159828c%7C0%7C0%7C636918060982525851&amp;sdata=lypR%2BzZ5VYYywp8pek7agluCxMe9aPtAqF4KnOy33sg%3D&amp;reserved=0">mndnr.gov/line3</a>. Each of the webinars will be recorded and will be available later on the same webpage, where people can also sign up for automatic email updates.</p>
<p><strong>How to comment on Enbridge applications</strong><br />
Enbridge needs several licenses and permits to construct and operate a replacement of the Line 3 oil pipeline across Minnesota.</p>
<p>The DNR is accepting comments through May 17 on the applications for those licenses and permits that Enbridge is seeking from the DNR. The DNR will review and consider all comments received on the license and permit applications before making any final decisions. Comments may be submitted online at <a href="http://links.govdelivery.com:80/track?type=click&amp;enid=ZWFzPTEmbWFpbGluZ2lkPTIwMTkwNDI1LjUxNDY3NDEmbWVzc2FnZWlkPU1EQi1QUkQtQlVMLTIwMTkwNDI1LjUxNDY3NDEmZGF0YWJhc2VpZD0xMDAxJnNlcmlhbD0xNzYwNzA4MyZlbWFpbGlkPWp1bGllLmZvcnN0ZXJAc3RhdGUubW4udXMmdXNlcmlkPWp1bGllLmZvcnN0ZXJAc3RhdGUubW4udXMmZmw9JmV4dHJhPU11bHRpdmFyaWF0ZUlkPSYmJg==&amp;&amp;&amp;100&amp;&amp;&amp;https://www.mndnr.gov/line3?utm_medium=email&amp;utm_source=govdelivery">mndnr.gov/line3</a> or may also be mailed to the DNR at 500 Lafayette Road, St. Paul MN 55155-4025, Attention Line 3 Replacement Applications.</p>
<p>Comments that express support for or opposition to the project as a whole, or that address the Minnesota Public Utility Commission’s prior decisions on project need and route, do not relate to the criteria the DNR must use in making its decisions on the pending applications. Therefore, while such comments are welcome, they will not inform the DNR’s decision-making.</p>
<p>Line 3 is one of six Enbridge oil pipelines that cross Minnesota. Enbridge is proposing to replace the existing Line 3 with a new, higher capacity line. The Public Utilities Commission has granted Enbridge a certificate of need and a route permit for the Line 3 replacement, which would follow the existing Line 3 route in places and a new alignment in other areas.</p>
<p>The DNR is seeking public comment on the following applications:</p>
<ul>
<li>Utility Crossing License for State Land.</li>
<li>Utility Crossing License for Public Water.</li>
<li>Water Appropriation for Hydrostatic Testing and Horizontal Directional Drilling (HDD).</li>
<li>Water Appropriation for Trench and Construction Dewatering.</li>
<li>Water Appropriation for Dust Control.</li>
<li>Water Appropriation for Construction Near Gully 30 (calcareous fen).</li>
<li>Work in Public Waters for Public Water Wetlands on Private Land.</li>
<li>Work in Public Waters for Willow River Bridge.</li>
<li>Calcareous Fen Management Plan (Gully 30).</li>
<li>Threatened and Endangered Species Taking Permit.</li>
</ul>
<p>All permit and license applications are available for review at <a href="http://links.govdelivery.com:80/track?type=click&amp;enid=ZWFzPTEmbWFpbGluZ2lkPTIwMTkwNDI1LjUxNDY3NDEmbWVzc2FnZWlkPU1EQi1QUkQtQlVMLTIwMTkwNDI1LjUxNDY3NDEmZGF0YWJhc2VpZD0xMDAxJnNlcmlhbD0xNzYwNzA4MyZlbWFpbGlkPWp1bGllLmZvcnN0ZXJAc3RhdGUubW4udXMmdXNlcmlkPWp1bGllLmZvcnN0ZXJAc3RhdGUubW4udXMmZmw9JmV4dHJhPU11bHRpdmFyaWF0ZUlkPSYmJg==&amp;&amp;&amp;101&amp;&amp;&amp;https://www.mndnr.gov/line3?utm_medium=email&amp;utm_source=govdelivery">mndnr.gov/line3</a>.</p>
<hr />
<p>&nbsp;</p>
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		<title>Spring burning restrictions begin in Minnesota</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/04/23/spring-burning-restrictions-begin-in-minnesota-2/</link>
		<pubDate>Tue, 23 Apr 2019 18:20:45 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fire]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Forestry]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=21858</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[Warm temperatures and dry conditions mean increased wildfire risk, so the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources will restrict open burning in the following counties effective immediately: Anoka, Benton, Chisago, Douglas, Grant, Hennepin, Isanti, Kanabec, Mille Lacs, Morrison, Pine, Pope, Ramsey, &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/04/23/spring-burning-restrictions-begin-in-minnesota-2/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Warm temperatures and dry conditions mean increased wildfire risk, so the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources will restrict open burning in the following counties effective immediately: Anoka, Benton, Chisago, Douglas, Grant, Hennepin, Isanti, Kanabec, Mille Lacs, Morrison, Pine, Pope, Ramsey, Sherburne, Stearns, Stevens, Todd, Traverse, Washington, and Wright. <span id="more-21858"></span></p>
<p>The state will not issue burning permits for brush or yard waste in these counties until restrictions are lifted.</p>
<p>“Escaped debris burns are the number one cause of wildfires, so that’s why we issue these restrictions,” said Casey McCoy, DNR fire prevention supervisor. “They really work—we’ve reduced wildfires by nearly a third since we started spring burning restrictions in 2001.”</p>
<p>McCoy encourages residents to use alternatives to burning, such as composting, chipping, or taking brush to a collection site. For information on how to compost yard debris, visit the <a href="http://links.govdelivery.com:80/track?type=click&amp;enid=ZWFzPTEmbWFpbGluZ2lkPTIwMTkwNDIzLjUwNDkzNTEmbWVzc2FnZWlkPU1EQi1QUkQtQlVMLTIwMTkwNDIzLjUwNDkzNTEmZGF0YWJhc2VpZD0xMDAxJnNlcmlhbD0xNzYwNjQxNyZlbWFpbGlkPWp1bGllLmZvcnN0ZXJAc3RhdGUubW4udXMmdXNlcmlkPWp1bGllLmZvcnN0ZXJAc3RhdGUubW4udXMmZmw9JmV4dHJhPU11bHRpdmFyaWF0ZUlkPSYmJg==&amp;&amp;&amp;100&amp;&amp;&amp;https://www.dnr.state.mn.us/wildfire/prevention/debris-composting.html?utm_medium=email&amp;utm_source=govdelivery">DNR’s guide to composting yard debris</a>.</p>
<p>People who burn debris will be held financially responsible if their fire escapes and burns other property.</p>
<p>Burning restrictions will be adjusted, including extension of restrictions to additional counties, as conditions change. For information and daily updates on current fire risk and open burning restrictions, visit the <a href="http://links.govdelivery.com:80/track?type=click&amp;enid=ZWFzPTEmbWFpbGluZ2lkPTIwMTkwNDIzLjUwNDkzNTEmbWVzc2FnZWlkPU1EQi1QUkQtQlVMLTIwMTkwNDIzLjUwNDkzNTEmZGF0YWJhc2VpZD0xMDAxJnNlcmlhbD0xNzYwNjQxNyZlbWFpbGlkPWp1bGllLmZvcnN0ZXJAc3RhdGUubW4udXMmdXNlcmlkPWp1bGllLmZvcnN0ZXJAc3RhdGUubW4udXMmZmw9JmV4dHJhPU11bHRpdmFyaWF0ZUlkPSYmJg==&amp;&amp;&amp;101&amp;&amp;&amp;https://www.dnr.state.mn.us/forestry/fire/firerating_restrictions.html?utm_medium=email&amp;utm_source=govdelivery">Minnesota DNR website</a>.</p>
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		<title>Drop the drone during fire season</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/04/23/drop-the-drone-during-fire-season-2/</link>
		<pubDate>Tue, 23 Apr 2019 18:19:26 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fire]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Forestry]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=21856</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[Flying a drone can be a lot of fun—but it can be downright dangerous during a wildfire, according to the Department of Natural Resources.  “Most people wouldn’t dream of driving their car in front of a fire engine that’s responding &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/04/23/drop-the-drone-during-fire-season-2/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Flying a drone can be a lot of fun—but it can be downright dangerous during a wildfire, according to the Department of Natural Resources. <span id="more-21856"></span></p>
<p>“Most people wouldn’t dream of driving their car in front of a fire engine that’s responding to a fire,” said Casey McCoy, the DNR’s fire prevention supervisor. “Flying your drone during a wildfire is just as reckless: we have to ground our planes until the drone gets out of the way, and that slows down our ability to fight the fire.”</p>
<p>This happened last year during a wildfire in Little Falls: DNR pilots had to land firefighting helicopters because a drone was buzzing overhead. According to McCoy, “interfering with fire operations in this way is dangerous for our aircraft, firefighters on the ground, and the general public.”</p>
<p>The reason drones pose such a problem is because they fly at roughly the same altitude as wildfire suppression aircraft. Even a small drone can cause a fire-fighting helicopter to crash if the drone makes contact with the aircraft.</p>
<p>Flying a drone over a wildfire isn’t just dangerous, it’s illegal: Federal law prohibits interfering with firefighting operations, and that includes flying a drone over a wildfire.</p>
<p>To protect firefighting aircraft, temporary flight restrictions may extend over a 5-mile radius of a wildfire. Even if temporary flight restrictions are not in place, people will be penalized if their drone is caught near a wildfire.</p>
<p>Be fire wise and fire safe. No photo or video is worth the risk. Drop the drone near all wildfires.</p>
<p>For more information about drones and wildfires, log onto the <a href="https://gcc01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.nifc.gov%2Fdrones%2Foutreach.html%3Futm_medium%3Demail%26utm_source%3Dgovdelivery&amp;data=02%7C01%7CJulie.Forster%40state.mn.us%7Cc0886ed8ffd94cf73eac08d6c808b749%7Ceb14b04624c445198f26b89c2159828c%7C0%7C0%7C636916337091011911&amp;sdata=yC4ELy6l3Ic14G8scDWtEzygPRT7dKGuT3ch5seJHZ8%3D&amp;reserved=0">National Interagency Fire Center</a>.</p>
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		<title>Celebrations planned to mark 100 years at Sibley State Park</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/04/22/celebrations-planned-to-mark-100-years-at-sibley-state-park/</link>
		<pubDate>Mon, 22 Apr 2019 19:41:31 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[State Parks]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=21853</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[Popular destination in Kandiyohi County was designated on April 23, 1919 Celebration events are planned throughout the summer to honor 100 years of Sibley State Park, according to the Department of Natural Resources. The park, in west-central Minnesota, is named &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/04/22/celebrations-planned-to-mark-100-years-at-sibley-state-park/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<h1></h1>
<p><em>Popular destination in Kandiyohi County was designated on April 23, 1919</em></p>
<p>Celebration events are planned throughout the summer to honor 100 years of Sibley State Park, according to the Department of Natural Resources. The park, in west-central Minnesota, is named for the state’s first governor, Henry Hastings Sibley, and was funded by the state Legislature and designated as a state park on April 23, 1919.  <span id="more-21853"></span></p>
<p><img class="alignleft size-medium wp-image-21854" src="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/-6-300x219." alt="" width="300" height="219" srcset="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/-6-300x219. 300w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/-6-75x55. 75w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/-6-768x561. 768w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/-6-600x438. 600w" sizes="(max-width: 300px) 100vw, 300px" />“Sibley State Park is a special place for many people,” said park naturalist Kelsey Olson. “All are welcome to help us celebrate throughout this year.”</p>
<p>The celebrations, starting with the April 23 anniversary, will feature historical hikes, canoe paddles, live music and many more events. The family-friendly parties will also provide historical context for park visitors. Guests can also participate in the 1+9 1919 Celebration Punch Card Club, where participants can earn an invitation to a private centennial party if they attend ten programs this year.</p>
<p>“Whether it’s the lakes, the prairie, or the breathtaking views from Mt. Tom, people really treasure this place,” said Sibley State Park manager Jack Nelson. “We know there are family traditions rooted in this park, so it’s important that there are activities for all ages to enjoy.”</p>
<p>The park was originally established as a game refuge in 1917. But due to its popularity and need for protection, it became a state park two years later. In 1935, the federal government sent the Veterans Conservation Corps, which consisted of World War I veterans, to build roads, trails and camp facilities. Many of those structures, including the log-and-stone buildings, still stand today and give the park its distinct look.</p>
<p>The park has seen many changes throughout the years. Originally high prairie, VCC workers created important park features such as the beach on Lake Andrew and the stone structure atop of Mt. Tom. Improvements continue, with Conservation Corps working with park management to restore the viewshed from Mt. Tom. The Sibley State Park Improvement Association, has acquired 200 acres to add to the park with the help of the Parks and Trails Council. These partners are also funding the planting of native plants and trees around the cabin area.</p>
<p>Renovations to the Lake Andrew beach area are ongoing, and community volunteers will work with the Sibley State Park Improvement Association Friday and Saturday (April 26 and 27) to plant native trees around the cabin area. A spur running from the park to the Glacial Lakes State Trail in New London is also in the works.</p>
<p>The 3,400-acre park remains a popular destination, with more than 40,000 overnight stays and 300,000 visitors each year.</p>
<p>Celebration events will be held several times each month through summer, beginning with a guided hike and Sibley State Park’s Centennial Social on April 23. A day-long celebration scheduled for June 8 will feature Voyageur canoe rides, an old-time softball game and live music with Siama Matuzundidi.</p>
<p>A full calendar of events is available on the park’s <a href="https://www.dnr.state.mn.us/state_parks/sibley/sibley-state-parks-100th-anniversary.html?utm_medium=email&amp;utm_source=govdelivery">webpage dedicated to its 100 year celebration</a>. More information about Sibley State Park can be found at <a href="https://gcc01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fmndnr.gov%2Fsibley%3Futm_medium%3Demail%26utm_source%3Dgovdelivery&amp;data=02%7C01%7CJulie.Forster%40state.mn.us%7C27881ba53046463257c708d6c74a04a4%7Ceb14b04624c445198f26b89c2159828c%7C0%7C0%7C636915518069753941&amp;sdata=aTvWrKTSMAEA6voF2iPQJYcn7%2F%2FNHdj7tVXadzAVA2Y%3D&amp;reserved=0">mndnr.gov/sibley</a>.</p>
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		<title>DNR seeks comments on EAW for Cuyuna Country State Recreation Area Trail development</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/04/22/dnr-seeks-comments-on-eaw-for-cuyuna-country-state-recreation-area-trail-development/</link>
		<pubDate>Mon, 22 Apr 2019 19:39:59 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[State Parks]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Trails]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=21851</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources is accepting comments through May 22 on an environmental assessment worksheet to address proposed expansion of recreational trails at Cuyuna Country State Recreation Area in Crow Wing County.  The DNR is proposing to develop &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/04/22/dnr-seeks-comments-on-eaw-for-cuyuna-country-state-recreation-area-trail-development/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources is accepting comments through May 22 on an environmental assessment worksheet to address proposed expansion of recreational trails at Cuyuna Country State Recreation Area in Crow Wing County. <span id="more-21851"></span></p>
<p>The DNR is proposing to develop 50 miles of new trails in the Yawkey, Mahnomen, Sagamore and Portsmouth units, and a trailhead and an outdoor event space in the Sagamore Unit.</p>
<p>Among the potential environmental and social effects evaluated in the EAW are impacts to trout streams, plant species of special concern, and historic mining structures.</p>
<p>A copy of the environmental assessment worksheet is available online at <a href="https://www.dnr.state.mn.us/input/environmentalreview/cuyuna-country-trail/index.html?utm_medium=email&amp;utm_source=govdelivery">mndnr.gov/input/environmentalreview/cuyuna-country-trail/index.html</a>.</p>
<p>A hard copy may be requested by calling 651-259-5694.</p>
<p>The document is available for public review at:</p>
<ul>
<li>DNR Library, 500 Lafayette Road, St. Paul, MN 55155.</li>
<li>DNR Northeastern Region Headquarters, 1201 East Highway 2, Grand Rapids, MN.</li>
<li>Hennepin County – Minneapolis Central Library, Government Documents, Second Floor, 300 Nicollet Mall, Minneapolis, MN  55401-1992.</li>
<li>Jessie F. Hallett Memorial Library, 101 1<sup>st</sup> St. SE, Crosby, MN.</li>
<li>Brainerd Public Library, 416S. 5<sup>th</sup> St., Brainerd, MN 56401.</li>
<li>Kitchigami Regional Library, 212 Park Ave., Pine River, MN.</li>
</ul>
<p>The EAW notice was published in the April 22 EQB Monitor, a weekly publication of the Environmental Quality Board. Written comments must be submitted no later than 4:30 p.m. Wednesday, May 22 to the attention of Kathy Metzker, EAW project manager, Environmental Policy and Review Unit, Ecological and Water Resources Division, DNR, 500 Lafayette Road, St. Paul, MN 55155-4025.</p>
<p>Electronic or email comments may be sent to <a href="mailto:environmentalrev.dnr@state.mn.us">environmentalrev.dnr@state.mn.us</a> with “CCRSA EAW” in the subject line. If submitting comments electronically, include name and mailing address. Written comments may also be sent by fax to 651-296-1811. Names and addresses will be published as part of the EAW record.</p>
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		<title>Be aware of bears this spring; DNR lists tips for avoiding conflicts</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/04/22/be-aware-of-bears-this-spring-dnr-lists-tips-for-avoiding-conflicts-3/</link>
		<pubDate>Mon, 22 Apr 2019 19:38:52 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
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		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=21849</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[Homeowners are reminded to be aware of bears this spring and check their property for food sources that could attract bears.   “Bears are roaming around now with the loss of snow and warmer weather, so interactions with people have started &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/04/22/be-aware-of-bears-this-spring-dnr-lists-tips-for-avoiding-conflicts-3/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Homeowners are reminded to be aware of bears this spring and check their property for food sources that could attract bears.  <span id="more-21849"></span></p>
<p>“Bears are roaming around now with the loss of snow and warmer weather, so interactions with people have started in many areas of Minnesota,” said Eric Nelson, wildlife damage program supervisor for the Department of Natural Resources.</p>
<p>As bears emerge from hibernation, their metabolism gradually ramps up and they will begin looking for food at a time when berries and green vegetation can be scarce. Remove attractants such as bird seed, garbage, livestock feed, or compost to reduce potential conflict. Attracting bears to yards can lead to property damage and presents dangers to bears.</p>
<p>Black bears are the only bear species that live in the wild in Minnesota. They usually are shy and flee when encountered. Never approach or try to pet a bear. Injury to people is rare, but bears are potentially dangerous because of their size, strength and speed.</p>
<p>The DNR does not relocate problem bears. Relocated bears seldom remain where they are released. They may return to where they were caught or become a problem somewhere else.</p>
<p>The DNR offers some tips for avoiding bear conflicts:</p>
<p><strong>Around the yard</strong></p>
<ul>
<li>Do not feed birds from April 1 to Nov. 15. Anytime you feed birds, you risk attracting bears.</li>
<li>If you must feed birds, hang birdfeeders 10 feet up and 4 feet out from the nearest trees. Use a rope and pulley system to refill birdfeeders, and clean up spilled seeds.</li>
<li>Do not put out feed for wildlife (like corn, oats, pellets or molasses blocks).</li>
<li>Replace hummingbird feeders with hanging flower baskets, which are also attractive to hummingbirds.</li>
<li>Do not leave food from barbeques and picnics outdoors, especially overnight. Coolers are not bear-proof.</li>
<li>Clean and store barbeque grills after each use. Store them in a secure shed or garage away from windows and doors.</li>
<li>Elevate bee hives on bear-proof platforms or erect properly designed electric fences.</li>
<li>Pick fruit from trees as soon as it’s ripe and collect fallen fruit immediately.</li>
<li>Limit compost piles to grass, leaves and garden clippings, and turn piles regularly. Do not add food scraps.</li>
<li>Harvest garden produce as it matures. Locate gardens away from forests and shrubs that bears may use for cover.</li>
<li>Use native plants in landscaping whenever possible.</li>
<li>Store pet food inside and feed pets inside. If pets must be fed outdoors, feed them only as much as they will eat.</li>
</ul>
<p><strong>Garbage</strong></p>
<ul>
<li>Store garbage in bear-resistant garbage cans or dumpsters. Rubber or plastic garbage cans are not bear-proof.</li>
<li>Keep garbage inside a secure building until the morning of pickup.</li>
<li>Properly rinse all recyclable containers with hot water to remove all remaining product.</li>
<li>Store recyclable containers, such as pop cans, inside.</li>
</ul>
<p>People should always be cautious around bears. If bear problems persist after cleaning up food sources, contact a DNR area wildlife office for advice. For the name of the local wildlife manager, contact the DNR Information Center at 651-296-6157 or 888-646-6367, or visit <a href="https://gcc01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.mndnr.gov%2Fcontact%2Flocator.html%3Futm_medium%3Demail%26utm_source%3Dgovdelivery&amp;data=02%7C01%7CJulie.Forster%40state.mn.us%7C27881ba53046463257c708d6c74a04a4%7Ceb14b04624c445198f26b89c2159828c%7C0%7C0%7C636915518069753941&amp;sdata=IY8CHKStY1wtG6l6392neAptKBYCyN23tZcAP7aDr9k%3D&amp;reserved=0">mndnr.gov/contact/locator.html</a>.</p>
<p>Last year the DNR asked the public to report bear sightings outside primary bear range in Minnesota. Male bears are known to travel long distances in search of new habitat and food, and there is a public perception that bear range has expanded in the central and southern counties of the state. For a map showing the primary bear range and to report a bear sighting outside of this range, visit <a href="https://www.dnr.state.mn.us/hunting/bear/bear-sightings.html?utm_medium=email&amp;utm_source=govdelivery">mndnr.gov/bear</a>.</p>
<p>For more about living in bear habitat, visit <a href="https://gcc01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.mndnr.gov%2Flivingwith_wildlife%2Fbears%3Futm_medium%3Demail%26utm_source%3Dgovdelivery&amp;data=02%7C01%7CJulie.Forster%40state.mn.us%7C27881ba53046463257c708d6c74a04a4%7Ceb14b04624c445198f26b89c2159828c%7C0%7C0%7C636915518069753941&amp;sdata=iu694VVT9Bt06wUp5yG55KXcMkvTc1dahAz6q%2BiHTpA%3D&amp;reserved=0">mndnr.gov/livingwith_wildlife/bears</a>.</p>
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		<title>DNR conservation officer dies in line of duty</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/04/20/dnr-conservation-officer-dies-in-line-of-duty/</link>
		<pubDate>Sun, 21 Apr 2019 00:22:50 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[Caleb Werth]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=21847</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[A Minnesota Department of Natural Resources conservation officer has died in the line of duty following an incident Friday, April 19, on Cross Lake in Pine City. CO Eugene Wynn, who patrolled the Pine City station, and a deputy with &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/04/20/dnr-conservation-officer-dies-in-line-of-duty/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>A Minnesota Department of Natural Resources conservation officer has died in the line of duty following an incident Friday, April 19, on Cross Lake in Pine City.</p>
<p><span id="more-21847"></span></p>
<p>CO Eugene Wynn, who patrolled the Pine City station, and a deputy with the Pine County Sheriff’s Office were responding to a report of a possible body in the water. The two officers launched Wynn’s boat and motored away from shore.</p>
<p>Within a minute, both were thrown from the boat into the water. Rescuers were able to rescue the deputy, who was treated and released from the hospital, but Wynn slipped beneath the water before rescuers could get to him. Wynn’s body was recovered at 1:35 a.m. on April 20.</p>
<p>An autopsy will be conducted. The Pine County Sheriff’s Office is leading the investigation into the incident. Questions about the investigation should be directed to the sheriff’s office at 320-629-8380.</p>
<p>Once called game wardens, conservation officers have protected Minnesota’s natural resources and people since 1887.</p>
<p>Wynn is the 22nd Minnesota conservation officer to die in the line of duty. He had been a conservation officer since 2001. Wynn is survived by his wife and two children.</p>
<p>“Words can’t describe the sense of loss we feel at this time,” said DNR Commissioner Sarah Strommen. “Officer Wynn’s service to the state of Minnesota is a debt we can never repay.”</p>
<p>Col. Rodmen Smith, DNR Enforcement Division director, said, “Officer Wynn served the Enforcement Division, the DNR, and the people of Minnesota with distinction. We’re devastated by his loss and ask the people of Minnesota to keep Officer Wynn and his family in their thoughts during this difficult time.”</p>
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