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	<title>MN Department of Natural Resources &#8212; News Releases</title>
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	<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us</link>
	<description>MN Department of Natural Resources -- News Releases</description>
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		<title>History comes to life at Mille Lacs Kathio State Park</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/09/19/history-comes-to-life-at-mille-lacs-kathio-state-park/</link>
		<pubDate>Thu, 19 Sep 2019 19:03:08 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[State Parks]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=22307</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[The Department of Natural Resources invites visitors to Mille Lacs Kathio State Park to join members of the Minnesota Archaeological Society on Sept. 28 for Archaeology Day. Attendees will learn about the region’s 9,000 years of human history, and how &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/09/19/history-comes-to-life-at-mille-lacs-kathio-state-park/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>The Department of Natural Resources invites visitors to Mille Lacs Kathio State Park to join members of the Minnesota Archaeological Society on Sept. 28 for Archaeology Day.<span id="more-22307"></span></p>
<p>Attendees will learn about the region’s 9,000 years of human history, and how this contributed to the designation of the park as a National Historic Landmark. The event will take place from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the park picnic area.</p>
<p>“Demonstrations, activities and displays will advance everyone’s knowledge of the park and Minnesota history, no matter what their age,” said Kris Erickson, park manager. “The park’s beautiful fall colors will offer an added perk.”</p>
<p>During the day, visitors can:</p>
<ul>
<li>Watch how “flint knapping” transforms a piece of stone into a tool.</li>
<li>See the way prehistoric pottery was created.</li>
<li>Observe an excavation where artifacts were discovered.</li>
<li>Examine a spear, and watch a spear-throwing demonstration.</li>
<li>Learn to shoot an arrow with instructors from the Archery in the Park program.</li>
</ul>
<p>Minnesota Archaeological Society publications as well as books and pamphlets from the Minnesota Historical Society, Maritime Heritage Minnesota, St. Cloud State University and other sources will be available. Archeology films will run continuously in the Interpretive Center.</p>
<p>The DNR is sponsoring the event, along with the Minnesota Archaeological Society and St. Cloud State University.</p>
<p>There is no charge for Archaeology Day activities. A vehicle permit is required to enter Minnesota state parks. Vehicle permits may be purchased at the park office. The cost of a daily permit is $7. An annual permit, which allows entry into all state parks for one year from the date of purchase, is $35.</p>
<p><a href="https://www.dnr.state.mn.us/state_parks/park.html?id=spk00232&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_source=govdelivery#homepage">Mille Lacs Kathio State Park</a> is located 8 miles north of Onamia, and 14 miles south of Garrison on U.S. Highway 169. For more information, call the park at 320-532-3523.</p>
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		<title>Deadline extended to apply to serve on fish and wildlife budget oversight committees</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/09/19/deadline-extended-to-apply-to-serve-on-fish-and-wildlife-budget-oversight-committees/</link>
		<pubDate>Thu, 19 Sep 2019 19:02:07 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fish and Wildlife]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fishing]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Hunting]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=22305</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[Minnesotans interested in helping the Department of Natural Resources determine how Game and Fish Fund dollars are spent now have through Friday, Oct. 11, to apply to serve on a review committee.  Minnesota’s Game and Fish Fund is the fiscal &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/09/19/deadline-extended-to-apply-to-serve-on-fish-and-wildlife-budget-oversight-committees/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Minnesotans interested in helping the Department of Natural Resources determine how Game and Fish Fund dollars are spent now have through Friday, Oct. 11, to apply to serve on a review committee. <span id="more-22305"></span></p>
<p>Minnesota’s Game and Fish Fund is the fiscal foundation for many of the state’s core natural resource management functions. Upwards of $110 million is deposited into this fund annually.</p>
<p>The DNR needs at least 12 people to serve on the fisheries oversight and wildlife oversight committees (a minimum of 6 for each committee). About half of the current members’ terms expire on Saturday, Dec. 14. Appointees will be responsible for reviewing the agency’s annual Game and Fish Fund report in detail.</p>
<p>People who want to serve should have a strong interest in natural resource management, how it is funded, financial review and working together. The goal is for the committee to have members from across the state with diverse perspectives and backgrounds.</p>
<p>DNR Commissioner Sarah Strommen will appoint committee members for two-year terms. Applications are available on the <a href="https://www.dnr.state.mn.us/gamefishoversight/index.html?utm_medium=email&amp;utm_source=govdelivery">DNR website</a>, along with more information about the fund, expenditure reports and oversight committee reports.</p>
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		<item>
		<title>Minnesota counties and residents benefit from PILT payments</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/09/19/minnesota-counties-and-residents-benefit-from-pilt-payments/</link>
		<pubDate>Thu, 19 Sep 2019 18:59:27 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=22303</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[Counties collect Payment in Lieu of Taxes for state-owned land not subject to property tax Minnesota’s 87 counties are the beneficiaries of $35.9 million in state payments that help support public lands.  The state’s Department of Revenue recently distributed annual &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/09/19/minnesota-counties-and-residents-benefit-from-pilt-payments/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<h1></h1>
<p><em>Counties collect Payment in Lieu of Taxes for state-owned land not subject to property tax</em></p>
<p>Minnesota’s 87 counties are the beneficiaries of $35.9 million in state payments that help support public lands. <span id="more-22303"></span></p>
<p>The state’s Department of Revenue recently distributed annual payments for <a href="https://www.dnr.state.mn.us/aboutdnr/legislativeinfo/pilt/index.html?utm_medium=email&amp;utm_source=govdelivery">Payment in Lieu of Taxes</a> (PILT), a property tax relief program that offsets tax revenues not collected on public lands. Counties have received PILT payments annually since 1979 in place of property taxes on 5.6 million acres of state-managed lands and 2.8 million acres of county-managed tax-forfeited lands. Money for the payments comes from the state’s general fund.</p>
<p>Every county in Minnesota has public lands within its borders and receives an annual PILT payment. In July, counties received anywhere from $21,443 in Red Lake County up to $3,792,842 in St. Louis County.</p>
<p>“PILT is an important and consistent revenue source for counties, but the benefits of public lands for Minnesotans go far beyond these annual payments,” said Minnesota Department of Natural Resources Commissioner Sarah Strommen. “Public lands support local economies through timber and mineral production, provide space for outdoor recreation and tourism, create habitat for wildlife, and help provide clean air and water.”</p>
<p>The state makes PILT payments on public lands including state parks and forests, scientific and natural areas and wildlife management areas, school trust lands, Consolidated-Conservation lands as well as county-managed tax-forfeited lands. Even lands that could never be developed and placed on the tax rolls are included in PILT calculations used to compensate counties.</p>
<p>Payment rates vary according to land type and range from $2 per acre, to three-quarters of 1 percent of appraised value. Payment for Lake Vermilion Soudan Underground Mine State Park is assessed at 1.5 percent of the appraised value of the land.</p>
<p>A breakdown of PILT payments for each county is posted on the <a href="https://www.revenue.state.mn.us/sites/default/files/2019-06/pilt_bycounty.pdf?utm_medium=email&amp;utm_source=govdelivery">Minnesota Department of Revenue website</a>.</p>
<p>More information about Minnesota’s public land portfolio, PILT payments, and a brief history of major public land transactions is available on the DNR&#8217;s <a href="https://gcc01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.mndnr.gov%2Fpubliclands.%3Futm_medium%3Demail%26utm_source%3Dgovdelivery&amp;data=02%7C01%7CJulie.Forster%40state.mn.us%7Cab9d1740b48546d5892108d73d1d77d3%7Ceb14b04624c445198f26b89c2159828c%7C0%7C0%7C637045069091187706&amp;sdata=TacAa9tCCEBPZNlvWGEqaCS7PPWDHe5OEXFAnKDEecU%3D&amp;reserved=0">public lands page</a>.</p>
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		<title>Check for invasive species when removing docks and equipment for seasonal storage</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/09/19/check-for-invasive-species-when-removing-docks-and-equipment-for-seasonal-storage-2/</link>
		<pubDate>Thu, 19 Sep 2019 18:58:03 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Aquatic Invasive Species]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fish and Wildlife]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fisheries]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fishing]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=22301</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources is reminding lake property owners to carefully check boats and trailers, docks and lifts, and all other water-related equipment for invasive species when removing equipment for seasonal storage.  This is important, as several new &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/09/19/check-for-invasive-species-when-removing-docks-and-equipment-for-seasonal-storage-2/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources is reminding lake property owners to carefully check boats and trailers, docks and lifts, and all other water-related equipment for invasive species when removing equipment for seasonal storage. <span id="more-22301"></span></p>
<p>This is important, as several new zebra mussel confirmations in recent years were initially reported by people removing docks, boats and boat lifts.</p>
<p>“These late summer/early fall confirmations are the result of Minnesotans being more vigilant and checking for invasive species when taking equipment out of the water,” said DNR Invasive Species Unit supervisor Heidi Wolf.</p>
<p>It’s especially important to follow Minnesota’s law and keep docks and boat lifts out of the water for at least 21 days before putting them into another body of water. This state law is central to the training DNR-permitted lake service provider businesses receive. Anyone transporting a dock or lift from the adjacent shoreline property to another location for storage or repair may need a <a href="http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/invasives/ais_transport.html?utm_medium=email&amp;utm_source=govdelivery">permit</a>, to help prevent the spread of aquatic invasive species.</p>
<p>The DNR recommends these steps for lake property owners:</p>
<ul>
<li>Look on the posts, wheels and underwater support bars of docks and lifts, as well as any parts of boats, pontoons and rafts that may have been submerged in water for an extended period.</li>
<li>Hire <a href="https://webapps15.dnr.state.mn.us/ais_business_training/lake_service_provider_permits/public_website_list?utm_medium=email&amp;utm_source=govdelivery">DNR-permitted lake service provider businesses</a> to install or remove boats, docks, lifts and other water-related equipment. These businesses have attended training on Minnesota’s aquatic invasive species laws and many have experience identifying and removing invasive species.</li>
<li><a href="http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/invasives/ais/contacts.html?utm_medium=email&amp;utm_source=govdelivery">Contact your area DNR aquatic invasive species</a> specialist if you think you have discovered an invasive species that has not already been confirmed in your lake.</li>
</ul>
<p>More information is available on the <a href="https://gcc01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.mndnr.gov%2FAIS%3Futm_medium%3Demail%26utm_source%3Dgovdelivery&amp;data=02%7C01%7CJulie.Forster%40state.mn.us%7Cab9d1740b48546d5892108d73d1d77d3%7Ceb14b04624c445198f26b89c2159828c%7C0%7C0%7C637045069091177708&amp;sdata=oBIagt%2BJJ8b1L38z9LprOeKzHJu%2FvcrE50%2F7d8EcGz0%3D&amp;reserved=0">aquatic invasive species</a> page.</p>
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		<item>
		<title>Waterfowl hunters: Make safety the priority before and during the hunt</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/09/19/waterfowl-hunters-make-safety-the-priority-before-and-during-the-hunt/</link>
		<pubDate>Thu, 19 Sep 2019 18:56:57 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fish and Wildlife]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Hunting]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Water Safety]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Waterfowl]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Wildlife]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=22299</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[Watching the sun rise over a marsh is an awe-inspiring experience, a memory bank deposit that for many duck hunters is as valuable as the number of birds they bag. Yet, every year some duck hunters find themselves in bad &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/09/19/waterfowl-hunters-make-safety-the-priority-before-and-during-the-hunt/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Watching the sun rise over a marsh is an awe-inspiring experience, a memory bank deposit that for many duck hunters is as valuable as the number of birds they bag. Yet, every year some duck hunters find themselves in bad situations, the result of falls into cold water, mishaps with their firearms, or other incidents that may forever cloud what’s supposed to be an enjoyable experience. <span id="more-22299"></span></p>
<p>As Minnesota’s waterfowl hunting season gets underway Saturday, Sept. 21, Department of Natural Resources conservation officers remind hunters to ensure their hunting and safety gear is in good condition before heading afield. Once they’re hunting, adhering to the key tenets of safe firearms handling is the best way to reduce the risk they’ll be involved in what could be a life-changing incident.</p>
<p>“Safe hunts are successful hunts, but they don’t just happen on their own,” said Jon Paurus, DNR Enforcement Division education program coordinator. “It’s up to hunters to put themselves in safe situations.”</p>
<p>For those who use boats during their hunt, that means thinking of themselves as boaters. Wearing a life jacket is the best way to avoid drowning. Colder water this time of year increases the likelihood of cold water shock and hypothermia. Duck hunters should tell someone else where they’re going and when they plan to return, and have a communication device such as a cell phone or radio along with them. Overloaded boats also are susceptible to capsizing or swamping, so it’s important to pack only the gear that’s necessary and distribute it as evenly as possible.</p>
<p>Each year, duck hunters also are involved in firearms-related incidents that lead to injury or death. The three most common factors are careless handling, not knowing the safe zone of fire and not being sure of what’s beyond the target. By following the four tenets of safe firearms handling, hunters can avoid most firearms and hunting-related incidents:</p>
<ul>
<li>Treat each firearm as if it is loaded.</li>
<li>Always control the muzzle of the firearm.</li>
<li>Be sure of the target and what’s beyond.</li>
<li>Keep finger off the trigger and outside the trigger guard until ready to shoot.</li>
</ul>
<p>###</p>
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		<item>
		<title>Zebra mussel confirmed in Long Lake, Ramsey County</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/09/19/zebra-mussel-confirmed-in-long-lake-ramsey-county/</link>
		<pubDate>Thu, 19 Sep 2019 18:55:42 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Aquatic Invasive Species]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fish and Wildlife]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fisheries]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fishing]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=22297</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources has confirmed a zebra mussel found by a contractor conducting an early detection survey in Long Lake in Ramsey County.  A contract diver found an adult zebra mussel attached to a native mussel near &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/09/19/zebra-mussel-confirmed-in-long-lake-ramsey-county/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources has confirmed a zebra mussel found by a contractor conducting an early detection survey in Long Lake in Ramsey County. <span id="more-22297"></span></p>
<p>A contract diver found an adult zebra mussel attached to a native mussel near the public access on Long Lake. DNR and Ramsey County staff did not find additional zebra mussels during a follow-up search. They noted that water clarity was poor and weather was overcast, so additional searches will be needed to determine whether there is an established zebra mussel population in Long Lake.</p>
<p>As with any such confirmation, Long Lake is listed for zebra mussels and invasive species signage has been posted at accesses. The DNR and Ramsey County will continue to monitor Long Lake for zebra mussels and other aquatic invasive species.</p>
<p>Lake property owners should carefully check boats and trailers, docks and lifts, and all other water-related equipment for invasive species when removing equipment for seasonal storage and report suspected new invasive species to the DNR.</p>
<p>It is especially important to follow Minnesota’s law and keep docks and boat lifts out of the water for at least 21 days before putting them into another body of water. This state law is central to the training DNR-permitted lake service provider businesses receive.</p>
<p>Anyone transporting a dock or lift from a shoreline property to another location for storage or repair may need a <a href="http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/invasives/ais_transport.html?utm_medium=email&amp;utm_source=govdelivery">permit</a>, to help prevent the spread of aquatic invasive species.</p>
<p>The DNR recommends these steps for lake property owners:</p>
<ul>
<li>Look on the posts, wheels and underwater support bars of docks and lifts, as well as any parts of boats, pontoons and rafts that may have been submerged in water for an extended period.</li>
<li>Hire <a href="https://webapps15.dnr.state.mn.us/ais_business_training/lake_service_provider_permits/public_website_list?utm_medium=email&amp;utm_source=govdelivery">DNR-permitted lake service provider businesses</a> to install or remove boats, docks, lifts and other water-related equipment. These businesses have attended training on Minnesota’s aquatic invasive species laws and many have experience identifying and removing invasive species.</li>
</ul>
<p>People should <a href="http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/invasives/ais/contacts.html?utm_content=&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_name=&amp;utm_source=govdelivery&amp;utm_term=">contact an area DNR aquatic invasive species specialist</a> if they think they have found zebra mussels or any other invasive species.</p>
<p>Minnesota law requires boaters and anglers to:</p>
<ul>
<li><strong>Clean</strong> watercraft and trailers of aquatic plants and prohibited invasive species.</li>
<li><strong>Drain</strong> all water by removing drain plugs and keeping them out during transport.</li>
<li><strong>Dispose</strong> of unwanted bait in the trash.</li>
</ul>
<p>Some invasive species are small and difficult to see at the access. To remove or kill them, take one or more of the following precautions before moving to another waterbody:</p>
<ul>
<li>Spray with high-pressure water.</li>
<li>Rinse with very hot water (120 degrees for at least two minutes or 140 degrees for at least 10 seconds).</li>
<li>Dry for at least five days.</li>
</ul>
<p>Zebra mussels can compete with native species for food and habitat, cut the feet of swimmers, reduce the performance of boat motors, and cause expensive damage to water intake pipes.</p>
<p>More information is available on the <a href="https://gcc01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.mndnr.gov%2Fais%3Futm_medium%3Demail%26utm_source%3Dgovdelivery&amp;data=02%7C01%7CJulie.Forster%40state.mn.us%7C3554ad85d1ef47165c7108d73d2f84ae%7Ceb14b04624c445198f26b89c2159828c%7C0%7C0%7C637045146622577292&amp;sdata=RCKspiipiO%2BNvPjebA%2BdMb77dJkVYRv8KVeiQZNBxKI%3D&amp;reserved=0">aquatic invasive species</a> page.</p>
]]></content:encoded>
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		<item>
		<title>Zebra mussels confirmed in Eagle Lake in Otter Tail County</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/09/19/zebra-mussels-confirmed-in-eagle-lake-in-otter-tail-county/</link>
		<pubDate>Thu, 19 Sep 2019 18:53:53 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Aquatic Invasive Species]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fish and Wildlife]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fisheries]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=22295</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources has confirmed multiple adult and juvenile zebra mussels in Eagle Lake in Otter Tail County.  A lake property owner removing equipment from the lake for the season contacted the DNR after finding what were &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/09/19/zebra-mussels-confirmed-in-eagle-lake-in-otter-tail-county/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources has confirmed multiple adult and juvenile zebra mussels in Eagle Lake in Otter Tail County. <span id="more-22295"></span></p>
<p>A lake property owner removing equipment from the lake for the season contacted the DNR after finding what were confirmed to be adult zebra mussels on a dock and related equipment being removed for the season. DNR staff conducted equipment searches and found seven juvenile zebra mussels in a second area of the lake, about three-quarters of a mile from the location of the original report.</p>
<p>Lake property owners should carefully check boats and trailers, docks and lifts, and all other water-related equipment for invasive species when removing equipment for seasonal storage.</p>
<p>It is especially important to follow Minnesota’s law and keep docks and boat lifts out of the water for at least 21 days before putting them into another body of water. This state law is central to the training DNR-permitted lake service provider businesses receive.</p>
<p>Anyone transporting a dock or lift from a shoreline property to another location for storage or repair may need a <a href="http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/invasives/ais_transport.html?utm_medium=email&amp;utm_source=govdelivery">permit</a>, to help prevent the spread of aquatic invasive species.</p>
<p>The DNR recommends these steps for lake property owners:</p>
<ul>
<li>Look on the posts, wheels and underwater support bars of docks and lifts, as well as any parts of boats, pontoons and rafts that may have been submerged in water for an extended period.</li>
<li>Hire <a href="https://webapps15.dnr.state.mn.us/ais_business_training/lake_service_provider_permits/public_website_list?utm_medium=email&amp;utm_source=govdelivery">DNR-permitted lake service provider businesses</a> to install or remove boats, docks, lifts and other water-related equipment. These businesses have attended training on Minnesota’s aquatic invasive species laws and many have experience identifying and removing invasive species.</li>
</ul>
<p>People should <a href="http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/invasives/ais/contacts.html?utm_content=&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_name=&amp;utm_source=govdelivery&amp;utm_term=">contact an area DNR aquatic invasive species specialist</a> if they think they have found zebra mussels or any other invasive species.</p>
<p>Minnesota law requires boaters and anglers to:</p>
<ul>
<li><strong>Clean</strong> watercraft and trailers of aquatic plants and prohibited invasive species,</li>
<li><strong>Drain</strong> all water by removing drain plugs and keeping them out during transport, and</li>
<li><strong>Dispose</strong> of unwanted bait in the trash.</li>
</ul>
<p>Some invasive species are small and difficult to see at the access. To remove or kill them, take one or more of the following precautions before moving to another waterbody:</p>
<ul>
<li>Spray with high-pressure water.</li>
<li>Rinse with very hot water (120 degrees for at least two minutes or 140 degrees for at least 10 seconds).</li>
<li>Dry for at least five days.</li>
</ul>
<p>Zebra mussels can compete with native species for food and habitat, cut the feet of swimmers, reduce the performance of boat motors, and cause expensive damage to water intake pipes.</p>
<p>More information is available on the <a href="https://gcc01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.mndnr.gov%2Fais%3Futm_medium%3Demail%26utm_source%3Dgovdelivery&amp;data=02%7C01%7CJulie.Forster%40state.mn.us%7C6f850f19392344a5123a08d73d30582d%7Ceb14b04624c445198f26b89c2159828c%7C0%7C0%7C637045150172364247&amp;sdata=zNU84km2srpwTjBUX5lKnJ6FO6gelYqu2lYO0jJ7j1Y%3D&amp;reserved=0">aquatic invasive species</a> page.</p>
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		<title>50 years of shoreland protection and land management</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/09/18/50-years-of-shoreland-protection-and-land-management/</link>
		<pubDate>Wed, 18 Sep 2019 16:54:56 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=22291</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[DNR commissioner celebrates benefits of three key measures from 1969 legislation Fifty years ago, the Minnesota Legislature ensured better land management and conservation through three key conservation measures. The Shoreland Protection Act, Floodplain Management Act, and legislation authorizing scientific and &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/09/18/50-years-of-shoreland-protection-and-land-management/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p><em>DNR commissioner celebrates benefits of three key measures from 1969 legislation</em></p>
<p>Fifty years ago, the Minnesota Legislature ensured better land management and conservation through three key conservation measures. The Shoreland Protection Act, Floodplain Management Act, and legislation authorizing scientific and natural areas were all signed into law in 1969 by Gov. Harold LeVander. <span id="more-22291"></span></p>
<img class="size-medium wp-image-22292" src="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/-7-300x199." alt="Shoreland restoration, Pelican Lake" width="300" height="199" srcset="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/-7-300x199. 300w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/-7-75x50. 75w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/-7-768x508. 768w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/-7-600x397. 600w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/-7 1000w" sizes="(max-width: 300px) 100vw, 300px" />
<p>At that time, most lake properties consisted of relatively tiny seasonal cabins built close to the water on small lots in a relatively natural state. Many Minnesota cities routinely suffered extensive flooding, endangering residents and causing massive economic losses. There was no broad program or legislation in place to protect natural landscapes in the state.</p>
<p>Fifty years later, shoreland management protections benefit both lakes and lake users. These measures have proven to be particularly important as large year-round lake homes and lawns, brick or stone hardscaping, and large docks and powerful boats have become common. While some communities still experience negative impacts from flooding, those that have undertaken flood risk reduction projects have fared relatively well, even with today’s more frequent and extreme rainfall events.</p>
<p>Scientific and natural areas protect native habitat and unique geologic features through a combination of private land purchases, land and money donations, leases from organizations like the Nature Conservancy, conservation easements and agreements with local governments.</p>
<p>“Minnesota leaders had tremendous foresight in enacting these measures fifty years ago, and all Minnesotans have reaped the benefits,” said DNR Commissioner Sarah Strommen. “Now, it’s our responsibility to build on the foundation these programs have provided as we manage our natural resources for the future.”</p>
<p>More information is available on the <a href="http://links.govdelivery.com:80/track?type=click&amp;enid=ZWFzPTEmbXNpZD0mYXVpZD0mbWFpbGluZ2lkPTIwMTkwOTE4LjEwMzM4NjkxJm1lc3NhZ2VpZD1NREItUFJELUJVTC0yMDE5MDkxOC4xMDMzODY5MSZkYXRhYmFzZWlkPTEwMDEmc2VyaWFsPTE2Nzk1OTEzJmVtYWlsaWQ9anVsaWUuZm9yc3RlckBzdGF0ZS5tbi51cyZ1c2VyaWQ9anVsaWUuZm9yc3RlckBzdGF0ZS5tbi51cyZ0YXJnZXRpZD0mZmw9Jm12aWQ9JmV4dHJhPSYmJg==&amp;&amp;&amp;100&amp;&amp;&amp;http://www.mndnr.gov?utm_medium=email&amp;utm_source=govdelivery">DNR website</a> about how to protect shorelands, how communities can reduce flood risks, and how everyone can enjoy and enhance Minnesota’s scientific and natural areas.</p>
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		<title>Fort Snelling State Park reopens after historic flooding</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/09/17/fort-snelling-state-park-reopens-after-historic-flooding/</link>
		<pubDate>Tue, 17 Sep 2019 16:01:14 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[State Parks]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=22289</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[State’s busiest park has been closed for six months The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources is reopening Fort Snelling State Park today, Sept. 17, after persistent spring flooding caused extensive damage that forced the park to close in March.  “We &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/09/17/fort-snelling-state-park-reopens-after-historic-flooding/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p><em>State’s busiest park has been closed for six months</em></p>
<p>The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources is reopening Fort Snelling State Park today, Sept. 17, after persistent spring flooding caused extensive damage that forced the park to close in March. <span id="more-22289"></span></p>
<p>“We know how eager people have been to get back out to the park, so we’re really excited to finally be reopening,” said Fort Snelling State Park assistant supervisor Nick Bartels. “We still have a lot of work left to do and some parts of the park will remain closed until that work can be completed, but our goal has always been to reopen the park as soon as safely possible.”</p>
<p>Flooding damaged the park’s main roads, facilities and water supply lines, downed trees, and washed out hiking trails throughout the park.</p>
<p>As clean up and repairs continue, including silt removal and facility repairs, park operations are returning to normal.</p>
<p>“Come out this weekend to enjoy a picnic, take a hike, or attend a fun naturalist program,” said Bartels. “Just remember to check our website or call our park office for up-to-date information.”</p>
<p>Located at the confluence of the Minnesota and Mississippi rivers within the heart of the Twin Cities metropolitan area, Fort Snelling State Park averages nearly one million visitors every year and is a popular destination for hikers, bikers, birders and school groups.</p>
<p>Visitors can go to the <a href="http://links.govdelivery.com:80/track?type=click&amp;enid=ZWFzPTEmbXNpZD0mYXVpZD0mbWFpbGluZ2lkPTIwMTkwOTE3LjEwMjgwNzAxJm1lc3NhZ2VpZD1NREItUFJELUJVTC0yMDE5MDkxNy4xMDI4MDcwMSZkYXRhYmFzZWlkPTEwMDEmc2VyaWFsPTE2Nzk1NjA2JmVtYWlsaWQ9anVsaWUuZm9yc3RlckBzdGF0ZS5tbi51cyZ1c2VyaWQ9anVsaWUuZm9yc3RlckBzdGF0ZS5tbi51cyZ0YXJnZXRpZD0mZmw9Jm12aWQ9JmV4dHJhPSYmJg==&amp;&amp;&amp;100&amp;&amp;&amp;http://www.mndnr.gov/fortsnelling?utm_medium=email&amp;utm_source=govdelivery">Fort Snelling State Park</a> page for more information.</p>
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		<title>Tickets available for Minnesota Governor&#8217;s Pheasant Hunting Opener banquet</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/09/16/tickets-available-for-minnesota-governors-pheasant-hunting-opener-banquet-3/</link>
		<pubDate>Mon, 16 Sep 2019 19:52:00 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fish and Wildlife]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Hunting]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Pheasant]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Wildlife]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=22286</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[9th annual event to take place at Austin Holiday Inn Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz invites all Minnesotans to join him on Friday, Oct. 11 for the 9th Annual Minnesota Governor’s Pheasant Hunting Opener Community Banquet in Austin. Celebrating the pheasant opener &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/09/16/tickets-available-for-minnesota-governors-pheasant-hunting-opener-banquet-3/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p><em>9th annual event to take place at Austin Holiday Inn</em></p>
<p>Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz invites all Minnesotans to join him on Friday, Oct. 11 for the 9th Annual Minnesota Governor’s Pheasant Hunting Opener Community Banquet in Austin.<span id="more-22286"></span></p>
<p>Celebrating the pheasant opener is a long-standing Minnesota tradition, and one that Walz is proudly carrying on in his first pheasant opener as governor.</p>
<p>“I’m excited and proud to open the pheasant season in Austin,” Walz said. “I’m grateful for the hard work and hospitality shown by our hosts in Austin, and I invite everyone to join us for this special Minnesota fall tradition.”</p>
<p>Tickets to the banquet are $35 each and can be purchased at Discover Austin, or by calling 507-437-4563. The banquet will feature a social hour, dinner, and program which will include Walz, Department of Natural Resources Commissioner Sarah Strommen, Explore Minnesota Director John Edman, and local presenters. Tickets are available until sold out.</p>
<p>The banquet is part of a weekend of festivities in Austin that will showcase the many hunting, recreational, and travel opportunities the area has to offer visitors. Austin has a population of 24,563 and is located at the junction of Interstate 90 and U.S. Highway 218 just north of the Minnesota-Iowa state line in Mower County. Explore Minnesota and the DNR are assisting Discover Austin in planning the event.</p>
<p><strong>WHAT:</strong> Minnesota Governor’s Pheasant Hunting Opener Community Banquet<br />
<strong>WHERE:</strong> Austin Holiday Inn, 1701 4th St. NW, Austin, MN 55912<br />
<strong>WHEN:</strong> Friday, Oct. 11, — 5 p.m. social hour; 6 p.m. community banquet<br />
<strong>TICKETS:</strong> $35 per person</p>
<p>In person: Discover Austin (301 North Main St., Suite 101, Austin, MN 55912)<br />
By phone: 507-437-4563</p>
<p>More information and updates on the Governor’s Pheasant Hunting Opener can be found at <a href="http://exploreminnesota.com/mngpho?utm_content=&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_name=&amp;utm_source=govdelivery&amp;utm_term=">exploreminnesota.com/mngpho</a>.</p>
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		<title>Inaugural statewide youth deer season opens Oct. 17</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/09/16/inaugural-statewide-youth-deer-season-opens-oct-17/</link>
		<pubDate>Mon, 16 Sep 2019 19:40:54 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Deer]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Hunting]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Wildlife]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=22283</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[Minnesota offers mentors an ideal way to share hunting knowledge and traditions with youth ages 10-17 during its inaugural statewide youth deer season.  The four-day season begins Thursday, Oct. 17, and concludes Sunday, Oct. 20. It coincides with statewide teacher &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/09/16/inaugural-statewide-youth-deer-season-opens-oct-17/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Minnesota offers mentors an ideal way to share hunting knowledge and traditions with youth ages 10-17 during its inaugural statewide youth deer season. <span id="more-22283"></span></p>
<p><img class="alignleft size-medium wp-image-22284" src="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/-6-225x300." alt="" width="225" height="300" srcset="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/-6-225x300. 225w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/-6-56x75. 56w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/-6-768x1024. 768w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/-6-450x600. 450w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/-6 1200w" sizes="(max-width: 225px) 100vw, 225px" />The four-day season begins Thursday, Oct. 17, and concludes Sunday, Oct. 20. It coincides with statewide teacher workshops, so many Minnesota students don’t have school during the youth season’s first two days.</p>
<p>“This is a hunting season just for kids,” said Barb Keller, big game program leader for the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. “It’s a chance for parents, relatives and trusted adults to discover, explore and practice hunting with youth in Minnesota’s fields and forests.”</p>
<p>Minnesota’s youth deer season began in 2004 in northwestern Minnesota. Over the years, it expanded to 28 deer permit areas in parts of southeastern and northwestern Minnesota and the Twin Cities metro area where deer were most abundant.</p>
<p>A 2018 statewide survey of hunters showed support for a statewide youth deer season. Deer management interest groups supported the concept, too.</p>
<p>Typically, temperatures in the middle of October are warmer than those during the regular November firearm deer season, snow has yet to set in for winter, and deer are moving more during the daylight hours. Those factors create an ideal opportunity for youth deer hunters.</p>
<p>To participate, youth must be 10-17 years old and have a deer license. An adult parent, guardian, or mentor must accompany youth ages 10-13. All youth hunters and mentors must follow blaze orange/pink clothing requirements. Adults may not hunt, unless they are in an area open during the early antlerless season.</p>
<p>Complete youth season details are available on the DNR website on the <a href="https://gcc01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.mndnr.gov%2Fhunting%2Fdeer%2Fyouth.html%3Futm_medium%3Demail%26utm_source%3Dgovdelivery&amp;data=02%7C01%7CJulie.Forster%40state.mn.us%7C1566ab76257c48dc5ecd08d73ac71495%7Ceb14b04624c445198f26b89c2159828c%7C0%7C0%7C637042499038778445&amp;sdata=eOtDVQup1hWmnbSOTn5mGWq7NfVoX9TdCqU%2Fm6X7nNA%3D&amp;reserved=0">youth deer hunting page</a>.</p>
<p>“Hunting is a pathway for understanding nature, supporting sound natural resource management and becoming a conservation advocate,” Keller said. “Creating this opportunity is one of the ways the DNR is working to preserve Minnesota’s hunting heritage.”</p>
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		<title>Rushford artist wins Migratory Waterfowl Stamp contest</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/09/16/rushford-artist-wins-migratory-waterfowl-stamp-contest/</link>
		<pubDate>Mon, 16 Sep 2019 19:39:12 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Hunting]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Waterfowl]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=22280</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[The 2020 Minnesota Migratory Waterfowl Stamp will feature a painting of a pair of snow geese by Rushford artist Michael Sieve, who won the annual waterfowl stamp contest sponsored by the Department of Natural Resources. It was Sieve’s first time &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/09/16/rushford-artist-wins-migratory-waterfowl-stamp-contest/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>The 2020 Minnesota Migratory Waterfowl Stamp will feature a painting of a pair of snow geese by Rushford artist Michael Sieve, who won the annual waterfowl stamp contest sponsored by the Department of Natural Resources. It was Sieve’s first time winning this contest. <span id="more-22280"></span></p>
<img class="size-medium wp-image-22281" src="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/-5-300x217." alt="2020 Waterfowl Stamp.  First Place:  Michaels Sieve" width="300" height="217" srcset="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/-5-300x217. 300w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/-5-75x54. 75w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/-5-768x555. 768w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/-5-600x433. 600w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/-5 979w" sizes="(max-width: 300px) 100vw, 300px" />
<p>Fifteen artists submitted entries and two advanced as finalists in the Sept. 5 contest at the DNR’s Central Office in St. Paul. The other finalist was Scot Storm from Freeport. A five-member panel of judges from the DNR, Minnesota Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service selected the winning design.</p>
<p>The $7.50 Duck Stamp is required of all Minnesota waterfowl hunters ages 18 through 64. Stamp sales generate about $700,000 per year for waterfowl habitat enhancement projects.</p>
<p>The DNR offers no prizes for the stamp contest winner, but the winning artist retains the right to reproduce the work. Each year the entries are limited to a predetermined species that breeds in or migrates through Minnesota. The eligible species for the 2021 stamp design will be the greater scaup.</p>
<p>More information about habitat stamps is available on the <a href="https://www.dnr.state.mn.us/features/stamps/index.html?utm_medium=email&amp;utm_source=govdelivery">fish and wildlife habitat stamp program page</a>.</p>
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		<title>DNR announces fall 2019 land sale</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/09/16/dnr-announces-fall-2019-land-sale/</link>
		<pubDate>Mon, 16 Sep 2019 19:35:24 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=22278</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[Save the dates for upcoming sale The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources will offer 17 parcels of land at three public oral bid auctions in October. The auctions will be held in Virginia, Wadena and St. Paul.  The properties include &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/09/16/dnr-announces-fall-2019-land-sale/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p><em>Save the dates for upcoming sale</em></p>
<p>The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources will offer 17 parcels of land at three public oral bid auctions in October. The auctions will be held in Virginia, Wadena and St. Paul. <span id="more-22278"></span></p>
<p>The properties include unimproved recreational land in Carlton, Chisago, Isanti, Kanabec, Otter Tail, Pine, St. Louis, Wabasha and Wadena counties. More information about the parcels and can be found on the <a href="http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/lands_minerals/landsale/index.html?utm_medium=email&amp;utm_source=govdelivery">DNR’s Land Sale webpage</a>.</p>
<p>The auctions are:</p>
<ul>
<li>Thursday, Oct. 10 at Miner’s Memorial Building, 821 S. 9th Ave., Virginia. Held in conjunction with St. Louis County’s tax forfeit land sale. The DNR will have its own bidder registration at the same time as the county, starting at 9 a.m. The county auction begins at 10 a.m., followed immediately by the DNR’s auction.</li>
<li>Tuesday, Oct. 29, 10 a.m. at the DNR Central Office, 500 Lafayette Road, St. Paul.</li>
<li>Wednesday, Oct. 30, 10 a.m. at the Wadena County Courthouse, 415 Jefferson St. S. Wadena.</li>
</ul>
<p>Public auction details, parcel information, and the latest updates will be posted online on the <a href="https://www.dnr.state.mn.us/lands_minerals/landsale/index.html?utm_medium=email&amp;utm_source=govdelivery">land sale page</a>. Questions can be directed to 651-259-5432, 888-646-6367 or <a href="mailto:min.landsale@state.mn.us">min.landsale@state.mn.us</a>.</p>
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		<title>Teach a kid to hunt small game during Take a Kid Hunting Weekend</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/09/16/teach-a-kid-to-hunt-small-game-during-take-a-kid-hunting-weekend-3/</link>
		<pubDate>Mon, 16 Sep 2019 19:33:40 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fish and Wildlife]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Hunting]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Pheasant]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Ruffed Grouse]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Waterfowl]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Wildlife]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=22276</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[Getting youth outdoors in pursuit of squirrels, rabbits and other small game is the focus of Take a Kid Hunting Weekend this Saturday, Sept. 21, and Sunday, Sept. 22.  During the weekend, adult Minnesota residents accompanied by a youth younger &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/09/16/teach-a-kid-to-hunt-small-game-during-take-a-kid-hunting-weekend-3/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Getting youth outdoors in pursuit of squirrels, rabbits and other small game is the focus of Take a Kid Hunting Weekend this Saturday, Sept. 21, and Sunday, Sept. 22. <span id="more-22276"></span></p>
<p>During the weekend, adult Minnesota residents accompanied by a youth younger than age 16 can hunt small game without a license, but must comply with open seasons, limits and other regulations.</p>
<p>“Small game hunting helps teach the basics and goes a long way toward getting ready for hunting bigger game like turkey or deer,” said James Burnham, recruitment, retention and reactivation coordinator for the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. “Not to mention that squirrels and rabbits can provide delicious, local food.”</p>
<p>Hunting small game provides a lower stress environment when kids are learning how to search for game sign, proper firearms handling, and accessing hunting properties. It can be more active than some types of hunting that involve lengthier periods of time sitting still and being quiet.</p>
<p>“Plus, you get to get in a good walk and have a decent conversation, so it’s less time just sitting and waiting for something to happen,” Burnham said.</p>
<p>After small game hunting, youth can bring the skills they’ve gained to the youth deer season, Thursday, Oct. 17, through Sunday, Oct. 20. That season coincides with statewide teacher workshops, so many Minnesota students don’t have school during the youth season’s first two days.</p>
<p>For more information on small game hunting and hunting regulations, visit the <a href="https://gcc01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.mndnr.gov%2Fhunting%2Fsmallgame%3Futm_medium%3Demail%26utm_source%3Dgovdelivery&amp;data=02%7C01%7CJulie.Forster%40state.mn.us%7C1566ab76257c48dc5ecd08d73ac71495%7Ceb14b04624c445198f26b89c2159828c%7C0%7C0%7C637042499038778445&amp;sdata=hFnbx8EGXkIGYeDkg%2F03Zlqksc5G%2FT2tUB%2Fo8xJPgXM%3D&amp;reserved=0">small game hunting page</a>.</p>
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		<title>Good waterfowl opener expected this weekend</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/09/16/good-waterfowl-opener-expected-this-weekend-6/</link>
		<pubDate>Mon, 16 Sep 2019 19:32:05 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fish and Wildlife]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Hunting]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Waterfowl]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=22273</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[Duck hunting is expected to be good when Minnesota’s regular waterfowl season opens a half-hour before sunrise on Saturday, Sept. 21.  “We’re continuing to see favorable counts of breeding ducks in Minnesota and North America so we hope hunters enjoy &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/09/16/good-waterfowl-opener-expected-this-weekend-6/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Duck hunting is expected to be good when Minnesota’s regular waterfowl season opens a half-hour before sunrise on Saturday, Sept. 21. <span id="more-22273"></span></p>
<p><img class="alignleft size-medium wp-image-22274" src="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/-4-300x225." alt="" width="300" height="225" srcset="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/-4-300x225. 300w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/-4-75x56. 75w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/-4-768x576. 768w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/-4-600x450. 600w" sizes="(max-width: 300px) 100vw, 300px" />“We’re continuing to see favorable counts of breeding ducks in Minnesota and North America so we hope hunters enjoy what’s shaping up to be a great season,” said Steve Cordts, Department of Natural Resources waterfowl specialist.</p>
<p>This past spring, biologists estimated the total breeding duck population in Minnesota at 14 percent above the long-term average and nearly identical to last year’s estimate of 693,000 ducks.</p>
<p>The estimated number of wetlands was 19 percent higher than last year and 23 percent above the long-term average, reflecting the wet year. Wetland numbers can vary greatly based on annual precipitation.</p>
<p>The spring estimate for Canada geese was 110,000 birds, down 32 percent from last year’s estimate; however, reproduction during the spring and summer affects how many birds hunters see in the fall. Reproduction was good this year, so there are still plenty of geese around for hunters.</p>
<p><strong>Duck seasons and limits</strong><strong><br />
</strong>The duck season structure is similar to recent years. The waterfowl seasons are based on a federal framework that applies to all states in the Mississippi Flyway. Waterfowl hunting regulations are available wherever DNR licenses are sold and <a href="https://gcc01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=mndnr.gov%2Fregulations%2Fhunting&amp;data=02%7C01%7CJulie.Forster%40state.mn.us%7C1566ab76257c48dc5ecd08d73ac71495%7Ceb14b04624c445198f26b89c2159828c%7C0%7C0%7C637042499038768445&amp;sdata=RjYjSiSfwXNPti%2FJ8IsO46aaY0oMklNDlQJ2Y3FJLJ8%3D&amp;reserved=0">available online</a>.</p>
<p>Duck season will be open for 60 days in each of the three waterfowl zones:</p>
<ul>
<li>In the north zone, duck season is Sept. 21 through Tuesday, Nov. 19.</li>
</ul>
<ul>
<li>In the central zone, duck season is Sept. 21 through Sunday, Sept. 29, closes for five days, then reopens Saturday, Oct. 5, and runs through Sunday, Nov. 24.</li>
<li>In the south zone, duck season is Sept. 21 through Sept. 29, closes for 12 days, then reopens Saturday, Oct. 12, and runs through Sunday, Dec. 1.</li>
</ul>
<p>The daily duck bag limit is six per day. The mallard bag limit is four per day, including no more than two hen mallards. The daily bag limits are three for wood duck and three for scaup; two for redheads, two for canvasbacks, two for black ducks and one for pintail.</p>
<p>The DNR will post a weekly waterfowl migration report each week during the duck season. The reports are typically posted on Thursday afternoon on the <a href="https://www.dnr.state.mn.us/hunting/waterfowl/index.html?utm_medium=email&amp;utm_source=govdelivery">waterfowl hunting page</a>.</p>
<p><strong>Goose and sandhill crane seasons</strong><strong><br />
</strong>Minnesota’s goose season will reopen in conjunction with the duck season statewide on Sept. 21, with a bag limit of three dark geese per day the entire season. Dark geese include Canada geese, white-fronted geese and brant geese. The daily bag limit for light geese is 20. Light geese include snow, blue and Ross’s geese.</p>
<p>The season for sandhill cranes opened Sept. 14, and remains open through Sunday, Oct. 20, in the northwest goose and sandhill crane zone only. The daily bag limit is one sandhill crane per day. A $3 sandhill crane permit is required in addition to a small game hunting license.</p>
<p>More information on duck, goose, sandhill crane and other migratory bird hunting is available in the 2019 Minnesota Waterfowl Hunting Regulations booklet from license vendors and online on the <a href="https://gcc01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.mndnr.gov%2Fhunting%2Fwaterfowl%3Futm_medium%3Demail%26utm_source%3Dgovdelivery&amp;data=02%7C01%7CJulie.Forster%40state.mn.us%7C1566ab76257c48dc5ecd08d73ac71495%7Ceb14b04624c445198f26b89c2159828c%7C0%7C0%7C637042499038768445&amp;sdata=YdPrCYtJT5TXvI1vJS1j8TqNcM2GvEGbKxwqHkBjpJY%3D&amp;reserved=0">waterfowl hunting page</a>.</p>
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		<title>DNR seeks comments on northern pike regulations for Mitchell Lake, Crow Wing County</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/09/13/dnr-seeks-comments-on-northern-pike-regulations-for-mitchell-lake-crow-wing-county/</link>
		<pubDate>Fri, 13 Sep 2019 14:30:57 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[chzeppel]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=22267</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[Anglers and others interested in proposed changes to northern pike regulations on Mitchell Lake, north of Fifty Lakes in Crow Wing County, are invited to attend an open house hosted by the Department of Natural Resources. The first open house &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/09/13/dnr-seeks-comments-on-northern-pike-regulations-for-mitchell-lake-crow-wing-county/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Anglers and others interested in proposed changes to northern pike regulations on Mitchell Lake, north of Fifty Lakes in Crow Wing County, are invited to attend an open house hosted by the Department of Natural Resources.<span id="more-22267"></span></p>
<p>The first open house will be on Sept. 24 from 6-8 p.m. at the Brainerd DNR Office, 1601 Minnesota Drive. The second open house will be on Sept. 25 from 6-8 p.m. at the DNR Central Office, 500 Lafayette Rd, St. Paul.  No formal presentation will be made at the open houses but fisheries staff will be on hand to provide background information, answer questions, and take public input.</p>
<p>The current northern pike regulation on Mitchell Lake was put in place in 2003 and requires a 40-inch minimum length with a possession limit of one fish.  This existing regulation, along with an increase in the number of fish that have survived from hatch to catchable size, have resulted in an overall increase in northern pike across a range of sizes.  The proposed regulation is a 24- to 36-inch protected slot limit and with a possession limit of three fish with only one over 36 inches allowed.</p>
<p>This regulation would allow harvest of smaller northern pike while protecting medium to large pike that are present in Mitchell, but are rare in other waterbodies in the area.</p>
<p>“This proposed 24- to 36-inch protected slot regulation has been successful in the Mission and Rabbit lakes in Crow Wing County,” said Marc Bacigalupi, DNR Brainerd area fisheries supervisor.  “We look forward to talking with anglers about their experiences on Mitchell Lake.  These public meetings provide an opportunity to exchange information and give us input that may not be represented in our lake surveys.”</p>
<p>Comments on this regulation can also be mailed to Marc Bacigalupi, area fisheries supervisor, DNR Brainerd area fisheries, 1601 Minnesota Drive, Brainerd, MN  56401, or sent by email to <a href="mailto:brainerd.fisheries@state.mn.us">brainerd.fisheries@state.mn.us</a><u>.</u>  Comments will be accepted through Oct. 4.</p>
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		<title>DNR seeks comments on northern pike regulations for Prairie Lake, St. Louis County</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/09/12/dnr-seeks-comments-on-northern-pike-regulations-for-prairie-lake-st-louis-county/</link>
		<pubDate>Thu, 12 Sep 2019 21:42:06 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[chzeppel]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Fishing]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Grand Rapids]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Lakes]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Region 2-NE]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=22265</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[Anglers and others interested in proposed changes to northern pike regulations on Prairie Lake, near Floodwood in St. Louis County, are invited to attend an open house hosted by the Department of Natural Resources this fall. A local open house &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/09/12/dnr-seeks-comments-on-northern-pike-regulations-for-prairie-lake-st-louis-county/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Anglers and others interested in proposed changes to northern pike regulations on Prairie Lake, near Floodwood in St. Louis County, are invited to attend an open house hosted by the Department of Natural Resources this fall.<span id="more-22265"></span></p>
<p>A local open house to receive input on Prairie Lake northern pike special regulations will be held on Oct. 3 from 6-8 p.m. at the Floodwood Fair Building, 107 W 7th Ave, Floodwood.  Fisheries staff will provide background information, answer questions, and take public input.</p>
<p>The proposed regulation change is part of a statewide review of existing special northern pike regulations. The regulation on Prairie Lake is proposed to change to a 24- to 36-inch protected slot limit and a possession limit of three fish with only one over 36 inches allowed.  The goal of the change is to allow more harvest opportunity than the current 30 inch minimum size limit, while sustaining the improved size structure of northern pike gained under the current regulation.</p>
<p>Notification of the proposed changes to special fishing regulations have been posted at the access to Prairie Lake for most of the open water fishing season.</p>
<p>“Fisheries staff spend much of their time collecting data on fish populations, which tells us if objectives spelled out in individual lake management plans are being met,” said Deserae Hendrickson, DNR Duluth area fisheries supervisor. “Angler input is important to help us capture information that may not be reflected in our data collection and anyone interested in pike management is encouraged to attend and provide their individual input.”</p>
<p>Those unable to attend a local meeting can also attend a Sept. 25 statewide open house to provide comment on this and other lakes. The Sept. 25 session will be held from 6-8 p.m. at the DNR Central Office, 500 Lafayette Rd, St. Paul.</p>
<p>Comments on these regulations can also be mailed to Duluth area fisheries, 5351 North Shore Drive, Duluth, MN  55804; or sent by email to duluth.fisheries@state.mn.us.  Questions about the meeting or regulation can be directed to the Duluth area fisheries office at 218-302-3266.  Written comments will be accepted through Oct. 13.</p>
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		<title>Grants available to help Minnesota communities fight emerald ash borer</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/09/12/grants-available-to-help-minnesota-communities-fight-emerald-ash-borer/</link>
		<pubDate>Thu, 12 Sep 2019 16:42:51 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Forestry]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=22262</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources has grant money available to help communities combat emerald ash borer and manage city-owned ash trees. Grants can help pay for tree inventories, management plans, ash removal and tree planting.  “These grants will help &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/09/12/grants-available-to-help-minnesota-communities-fight-emerald-ash-borer/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources has grant money available to help communities combat emerald ash borer and manage city-owned ash trees. Grants can help pay for tree inventories, management plans, ash removal and tree planting. <span id="more-22262"></span></p>
<p>“These grants will help communities struggling with emerald ash borer to manage their ash,” said Valerie McClannahan, DNR urban and community forestry coordinator. “The grants will also be available to help communities that are not infested prepare for the threat of EAB.”</p>
<p>Eligibility criteria and pre-application forms will be available on Friday, Sept. 13, on the DNR’s <a href="http://links.govdelivery.com:80/track?type=click&amp;enid=ZWFzPTEmbXNpZD0mYXVpZD0mbWFpbGluZ2lkPTIwMTkwOTEyLjEwMTAwNjkxJm1lc3NhZ2VpZD1NREItUFJELUJVTC0yMDE5MDkxMi4xMDEwMDY5MSZkYXRhYmFzZWlkPTEwMDEmc2VyaWFsPTE2Nzk0NjExJmVtYWlsaWQ9anVsaWUuZm9yc3RlckBzdGF0ZS5tbi51cyZ1c2VyaWQ9anVsaWUuZm9yc3RlckBzdGF0ZS5tbi51cyZ0YXJnZXRpZD0mZmw9Jm12aWQ9JmV4dHJhPSYmJg==&amp;&amp;&amp;100&amp;&amp;&amp;https://www.dnr.state.mn.us/grants/forestmgmt/managing-ash.html?utm_medium=email&amp;utm_source=govdelivery">EAB grant website</a>. Pre-applications are required and will determine which proposals advance to the final application process. Pre-applications must be emailed to <a href="mailto:ucf.dnr@state.mn.us">ucf.dnr@state.mn.us</a> by midnight on Friday, Oct. 4.</p>
<p>On average, 20 percent of community trees in Minnesota are ash, according to an estimate from a 2010 DNR survey. Minnesota communities are at risk of losing 2.65 million public and privately owned ash trees to EAB. This places a significant financial burden on cities as they manage their trees. The estimated cost to remove and replace a single city-owned ash tree is $1,000.</p>
<p>The loss of 2.65 million ash trees also presents environmental concerns for communities: it will result in an additional 1.7 billion gallons of water annually entering already stressed stormwater systems across Minnesota. Managing city-owned trees can reduce this stress as well as prevent the increase in temperatures, especially along boulevards, that the loss of canopy will cause.</p>
<p>Emerald ash borer is an invasive beetle that kills ash trees. To date, it has been discovered in 20 Minnesota counties. To see where EAB has been found in Minnesota, visit the Department of Agriculture’s <a href="http://links.govdelivery.com:80/track?type=click&amp;enid=ZWFzPTEmbXNpZD0mYXVpZD0mbWFpbGluZ2lkPTIwMTkwOTEyLjEwMTAwNjkxJm1lc3NhZ2VpZD1NREItUFJELUJVTC0yMDE5MDkxMi4xMDEwMDY5MSZkYXRhYmFzZWlkPTEwMDEmc2VyaWFsPTE2Nzk0NjExJmVtYWlsaWQ9anVsaWUuZm9yc3RlckBzdGF0ZS5tbi51cyZ1c2VyaWQ9anVsaWUuZm9yc3RlckBzdGF0ZS5tbi51cyZ0YXJnZXRpZD0mZmw9Jm12aWQ9JmV4dHJhPSYmJg==&amp;&amp;&amp;101&amp;&amp;&amp;https://mnag.maps.arcgis.com/apps/webappviewer/index.html?id=63ebb977e2924d27b9ef0787ecedf6e9&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_source=govdelivery">interactive</a> map.</p>
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		<title>DNR captures and tags silver carp in St. Croix River</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/09/12/dnr-captures-and-tags-silver-carp-in-st-croix-river/</link>
		<pubDate>Thu, 12 Sep 2019 16:41:37 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Aquatic Invasive Species]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=22259</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[Tagged fish will provide important research data The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources has implanted a small tracking device in a silver carp captured on the St. Croix River Tuesday. This is the first time the DNR has tagged a &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/09/12/dnr-captures-and-tags-silver-carp-in-st-croix-river/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p><em>Tagged fish will provide important research data</em><strong></p>
<p></strong>The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources has implanted a small tracking device in a silver carp captured on the St. Croix River Tuesday. This is the first time the DNR has tagged a silver carp, an invasive species that competes with native species for food.<span id="more-22259"></span></p>
<img class="size-medium wp-image-22260" src="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/-3-300x217." alt="tagged silver carp" width="300" height="217" srcset="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/-3-300x217. 300w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/-3-75x54. 75w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/-3-768x555. 768w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/-3-600x434. 600w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/-3 979w" sizes="(max-width: 300px) 100vw, 300px" />
<p>The tagged silver carp will provide the DNR with valuable data on the movement and habits of this invasive species in the river system. The capture and tagging of the carp was a direct result of the DNR’s tracking of a previously tagged bighead carp.</p>
<p>The DNR and a contracted commercial fishing business were tracking and attempting to net the tagged bighead carp Tuesday when they captured the silver carp 2 miles south of the I-94 bridge over the St. Croix River.</p>
<p>“We expect this tagged silver carp to provide useful information about the species’ habits, as has been the case with the previously tagged bighead carp,” said DNR invasive fish coordinator Nick Frohnauer. “Since carp tend to congregate, we’re also hopeful that the tagged silver carp will lead us to any other individual invasive carp that may be in the area, just as the tagged bighead carp has.” The tagged bighead carp has led to four invasive carp discoveries this year and two last year.</p>
<p><strong>BACKGROUND<br />
</strong>A few more invasive carp than usual have been captured in 2019, likely because persistent high water in southern Minnesota, Iowa and Illinois created prolonged “open river” conditions in which fish could move up the Mississippi River unimpeded by the river’s locks and dams. Open river conditions can benefit native species like lake sturgeon and paddlefish, which swim hundreds of miles in search of preferable habitat. Unfortunately, these conditions also allow other, non-native species to move upriver more easily.</p>
<p>Frohnauer noted that, while the DNR continues to be concerned about the potential impacts of invasive carp in Minnesota waters, individual adult fish captures do not indicate reproduction or an established population of invasive carp in the Mississippi River or elsewhere in the state. Individual invasive carp have been caught as far upstream as Mississippi River Pool 2 near the Twin Cities (bighead, grass, and silver), the King Power Plant on the St. Croix River by Oak Park Heights (bighead), and just downstream of Granite Falls in the Minnesota River (bighead).</p>
<p>Invasive carp have been progressing upstream since escaping into the Mississippi River from southern state fish farms in the 1970s. These large, filter feeding fish compete with native species and pose a threat to rivers and lakes.</p>
<p>The DNR Invasive Species Program has built partnerships with state and federal agencies, conservation groups, university researchers and commercial businesses to prevent the spread of invasive carp. The 2015 closure of the Mississippi River lock at Upper St. Anthony Falls in Minneapolis was a major accomplishment resulting from these efforts.</p>
<p>Invasive carp captures must be reported to the DNR immediately. Call 651-587-2781 or email <a href="mailto:invasivecarp.dnr@state.mn.us">invasivecarp.dnr@state.mn.us</a>. Take a photo and transport the carp to the nearest DNR fisheries office or make arrangements for it to be picked up by a DNR official.</p>
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		<title>Midge-borne virus causes death of wild deer in Stearns County  </title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/09/11/midge-borne-virus-causes-death-of-wild-deer-in-stearns-county/</link>
		<pubDate>Wed, 11 Sep 2019 15:10:01 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Deer]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Hunting]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Wildlife]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=22256</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources has confirmed the first two cases of epizootic hemorrhagic disease (EHD) in wild white-tailed deer in Minnesota. EHD is a viral disease that is spread by a biting insect called a midge.   “All of &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2019/09/11/midge-borne-virus-causes-death-of-wild-deer-in-stearns-county/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources has confirmed the first two cases of epizootic hemorrhagic disease (EHD) in wild white-tailed deer in Minnesota. EHD is a viral disease that is spread by a biting insect called a midge.  <span id="more-22256"></span></p>
<p>“All of our neighboring states have been dealing with EHD for years,” said Lou Cornicelli, DNR wildlife research manager. “So it was always a question of when it would show up in Minnesota.”</p>
<p>The DNR suspects several deer in the St. Stephen area have recently died from EHD. Tests from two of the deer were positive for EHD; other deer were too decomposed to test. The outbreak is limited to Stearns County. The disease incubates for 5-10 days, and most infected deer die within 36 hours of exhibiting symptoms.</p>
<p>“EHD is both naturally occurring and seasonal,” Cornicelli said. “Given our cold temperatures, we can expect to see a shortened period of infection as frost will kill both the virus and midge that carries it.”</p>
<p>The Minnesota Board of Animal Health confirmed EHD in two captive deer in Houston County on Sept. 5. Those cases appear unrelated to the Stearns County case. The disease first appeared in Minnesota captive deer in October 2018, when BAH confirmed it in six deer on a Goodhue County farm.</p>
<p>Wisconsin, Nebraska, Iowa, Illinois, Michigan and Ohio report EHD mortalities almost every year. In some cases, the disease can dramatically reduce a local deer population in the short-term but has a relatively small impact on the overall deer population. Iowa is experiencing an outbreak this year that has killed several hundred deer in the south-central part of the state.</p>
<p>Finding multiple dead deer near a water source is typical of an EHD die-off. Fever drives the animals to seek water, but they die from internal lesions and hemorrhages.</p>
<p>People who find a dead deer should report it to the nearest DNR area wildlife office. Contact information for each office is listed on the <a href="http://links.govdelivery.com:80/track?type=click&amp;enid=ZWFzPTEmbXNpZD0mYXVpZD0mbWFpbGluZ2lkPTIwMTkwOTExLjEwMDQyMzgxJm1lc3NhZ2VpZD1NREItUFJELUJVTC0yMDE5MDkxMS4xMDA0MjM4MSZkYXRhYmFzZWlkPTEwMDEmc2VyaWFsPTE2Nzk0MjkwJmVtYWlsaWQ9anVsaWUuZm9yc3RlckBzdGF0ZS5tbi51cyZ1c2VyaWQ9anVsaWUuZm9yc3RlckBzdGF0ZS5tbi51cyZ0YXJnZXRpZD0mZmw9Jm12aWQ9JmV4dHJhPSYmJg==&amp;&amp;&amp;100&amp;&amp;&amp;https://www.dnr.state.mn.us/areas/wildlife/index.html?utm_medium=email&amp;utm_source=govdelivery">DNR website</a>.</p>
<p>EHD is not a threat to humans or animals outside the deer family. Even so, people should not consume deer that appear to be sick or in poor health.</p>
<p>Additional information about EHD is available on the <a href="http://links.govdelivery.com:80/track?type=click&amp;enid=ZWFzPTEmbXNpZD0mYXVpZD0mbWFpbGluZ2lkPTIwMTkwOTExLjEwMDQyMzgxJm1lc3NhZ2VpZD1NREItUFJELUJVTC0yMDE5MDkxMS4xMDA0MjM4MSZkYXRhYmFzZWlkPTEwMDEmc2VyaWFsPTE2Nzk0MjkwJmVtYWlsaWQ9anVsaWUuZm9yc3RlckBzdGF0ZS5tbi51cyZ1c2VyaWQ9anVsaWUuZm9yc3RlckBzdGF0ZS5tbi51cyZ0YXJnZXRpZD0mZmw9Jm12aWQ9JmV4dHJhPSYmJg==&amp;&amp;&amp;101&amp;&amp;&amp;http://www.mndnr.gov/wildlifedisease/ehd.html?utm_medium=email&amp;utm_source=govdelivery">DNR website</a>.</p>
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