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	<title>MN Department of Natural Resources &#8212; News Releases</title>
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	<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us</link>
	<description>MN Department of Natural Resources -- News Releases</description>
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		<title>Tagged bighead carp leads DNR to 2 others in St. Croix River</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/05/17/tagged-bighead-carp-leads-dnr-to-2-others-in-st-croix-river/</link>
		<pubDate>Thu, 17 May 2018 16:24:05 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Aquatic Invasive Species]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Asian Carp]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=20805</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources captured two bighead carp May 11 during a search on the St. Croix River to recapture a tagged bighead carp they have been tracking as part of an invasive carp pilot project.  The carp &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/05/17/tagged-bighead-carp-leads-dnr-to-2-others-in-st-croix-river/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p class="gdp" style="margin: 0in 0in 7.5pt 0in;"><span style="font-family: 'Calibri',sans-serif; color: black;">The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources captured two bighead carp May 11 during a search on the St. Croix River to recapture a tagged bighead carp they have been tracking as part of an invasive carp pilot project. </span><span id="more-20805"></span></p>
<p class="gdp" style="margin: 0in 0in 7.5pt 0in;"><span style="font-family: 'Calibri',sans-serif; color: black;"><img class="alignleft size-medium wp-image-20806" src="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/-15-300x225." alt="" width="300" height="225" srcset="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/-15-300x225. 300w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/-15-75x56. 75w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/-15-768x576. 768w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/-15-600x450. 600w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/-15 958w" sizes="(max-width: 300px) 100vw, 300px" />The carp were captured in Anderson Bay on the St. Croix River. One was a 46-inch, 39-pound mature male, and the second was a 43-inch, 46-pound mature female. Neither fish showed indications that they had spawned this year. They were removed from the water and euthanized, and further lab analyses will provide more detailed and useful information about the fish.</span></p>
<p class="gdp" style="margin: 0in 0in 7.5pt 0in;"><span style="font-family: 'Calibri',sans-serif; color: black;">“We may not have immediately captured these two if the tagged carp hadn’t, in effect, led us to them,” DNR invasive fish coordinator Nick Frohnauer said. “Tagging is another proactive step Minnesota is taking to prevent the spread of invasive species.” </span></p>
<p class="gdp" style="margin: 0in 0in 7.5pt 0in;"><span style="font-family: 'Calibri',sans-serif; color: black;">The capture of the two bighead carp, an invasive species, is the result of the pilot project to track tagged invasive carp to learn more about their range, habitat preferences and other behaviors. </span></p>
<p class="gdp" style="margin: 0in 0in 7.5pt 0in;"><span style="font-family: 'Calibri',sans-serif; color: black;">Because of the signal from a small implanted transmitter, DNR Fisheries staff know the location of the tagged carp. While high water can complicate a capture operation, Fisheries staff, along with U.S. Fish and Wildlife staff and commercial anglers, are resuming efforts to recapture the tagged carp this week. </span></p>
<p class="gdp" style="margin: 0in 0in 7.5pt 0in;"><span style="font-family: 'Calibri',sans-serif; color: black;">The DNR is permitted to track up to two invasive carp in the St. Croix or Mississippi River at any given time. Anyone who catches a bighead, grass or silver carp must report it to the DNR immediately. Call 651-587-2781 or email </span><a href="mailto:invasivecarp.dnr@state.mn.us"><span style="font-family: 'Calibri',sans-serif; color: #0062b2;">invasivecarp.dnr@state.mn.us</span></a><span style="font-family: 'Calibri',sans-serif; color: black;">. Take a photo and transport the carp to the nearest fisheries office or make arrangements for it to be picked up by a DNR official.</span></p>
<p class="gdp" style="margin: 0in 0in 7.5pt 0in;"><span style="font-family: 'Calibri',sans-serif; color: black;">Individual bighead carp were first captured in Minnesota in 1996 and 2003, with more frequent reports in recent years as the DNR’s response and public awareness have grown. Invasive carp initially escaped into the Mississippi River from southern fish farms where they were used to control algae. These large fish compete with native species and pose a threat to rivers and lakes. </span></p>
<p class="gdp" style="margin: 0in 0in 7.5pt 0in;"><span style="font-family: 'Calibri',sans-serif; color: black;">No breeding populations have been detected in Minnesota waters. Individual bighead and silver carp have been caught in the Mississippi, St. Croix and Minnesota rivers.</span></p>
<p class="gdp" style="margin: 0in 0in 7.5pt 0in;"><span style="font-family: 'Calibri',sans-serif; color: black;">More information about invasive carp is available at </span><a href="http://www.mndnr.gov/invasivecarp?utm_content=&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_name=&amp;utm_source=govdelivery&amp;utm_term="><span style="font-family: 'Calibri',sans-serif; color: #0062b2;">www.mndnr.gov/invasivecarp</span></a><span style="font-family: 'Calibri',sans-serif; color: black;">.</span></p>
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		<title>Red flag warning issued</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/05/15/red-flag-warning-issued/</link>
		<pubDate>Tue, 15 May 2018 18:32:07 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Forestry]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Wildfire]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=20801</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[Extreme conditions for wildfire Most of the north half of Minnesota is under very high fire danger today, including a red flag warning issued by the National Weather Service for the following counties:  Polk (west), Kittson, Roseau, Lake Of The &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/05/15/red-flag-warning-issued/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Extreme conditions for wildfire</p>
<p>Most of the north half of Minnesota is under very high fire danger today, including a red flag warning issued by the National Weather Service for the following counties: <span id="more-20801"></span></p>
<p>Polk (west), Kittson, Roseau, Lake Of The Woods, Marshall (west), Marshall (east), Beltrami (north), Pennington, Red Lake, Polk (east), Clearwater (north), and Koochiching.</p>
<p>A red flag warning means the area is experiencing extreme weather conditions that are ideal for wildfire, including dry vegetation and gusty winds. Do not burn while the red flag warning remains in effect and check any burning done recently to ensure the fire is out. Any spark could become a wildfire under red flag conditions.</p>
<p>The red flag warning expires at 8 p.m.</p>
<p>Monitor <a href="mndnr.gov/burnrestrictions">mndnr.gov/burnrestrictions</a>, and follow <a href="http://links.govdelivery.com:80/track?type=click&amp;enid=ZWFzPTEmbWFpbGluZ2lkPTIwMTgwNTE1Ljg5Nzc3NjkxJm1lc3NhZ2VpZD1NREItUFJELUJVTC0yMDE4MDUxNS44OTc3NzY5MSZkYXRhYmFzZWlkPTEwMDEmc2VyaWFsPTE3NTE4MDI0JmVtYWlsaWQ9anVsaWUuZm9yc3RlckBzdGF0ZS5tbi51cyZ1c2VyaWQ9anVsaWUuZm9yc3RlckBzdGF0ZS5tbi51cyZmbD0mZXh0cmE9TXVsdGl2YXJpYXRlSWQ9JiYm&amp;&amp;&amp;100&amp;&amp;&amp;https://twitter.com/mnforestry?utm_content=&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_name=&amp;utm_source=govdelivery&amp;utm_term=">@mnforestry</a> on Twitter, for up-to-date information about the fire conditions statewide.</p>
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		<title>New firewood rules aim to protect Minnesota forests</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/05/14/new-firewood-rules-aim-to-protect-minnesota-forests/</link>
		<pubDate>Mon, 14 May 2018 17:06:36 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Forestry]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[State Forests]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[State Parks]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=20799</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[Campers and other visitors planning to have campfires at state parks, state forests and other public lands managed by the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources need to be aware of new firewood rules beginning this year.  New rules were needed, &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/05/14/new-firewood-rules-aim-to-protect-minnesota-forests/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Campers and other visitors planning to have campfires at state parks, state forests and other public lands managed by the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources need to be aware of new firewood rules beginning this year.  New rules were needed, because quarantine boundaries instituted for gypsy moth and emerald ash borer made the former rules problematic.  <span id="more-20799"></span></p>
<p>Under the new rules, firewood approved for use on DNR-managed lands includes:</p>
<ul>
<li>Firewood sold at the specific Minnesota state park or recreation area where it will be used.</li>
<li>Non-ash firewood that was (1) purchased from a vendor and (2) harvested in the same Minnesota county as the DNR unit where it will be used.</li>
<li>Firewood that was (1) purchased from a vendor, (2) harvested in Minnesota and (3) certified to be pest free by the Minnesota Department of Agriculture or the USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.</li>
<li>Additional types of acceptable firewood listed at <a href="http://links.govdelivery.com:80/track?type=click&amp;enid=ZWFzPTEmbWFpbGluZ2lkPTIwMTgwNTE0Ljg5NzE3MTExJm1lc3NhZ2VpZD1NREItUFJELUJVTC0yMDE4MDUxNC44OTcxNzExMSZkYXRhYmFzZWlkPTEwMDEmc2VyaWFsPTE3NTE3Njc4JmVtYWlsaWQ9anVsaWUuZm9yc3RlckBzdGF0ZS5tbi51cyZ1c2VyaWQ9anVsaWUuZm9yc3RlckBzdGF0ZS5tbi51cyZmbD0mZXh0cmE9TXVsdGl2YXJpYXRlSWQ9JiYm&amp;&amp;&amp;107&amp;&amp;&amp;http://www.mndnr.gov/firewood?utm_content=&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_name=&amp;utm_source=govdelivery&amp;utm_term=">www.mndnr.gov/firewood</a>.</li>
</ul>
<p>“One of our biggest challenges has been communicating that firewood sold at a Minnesota state park or recreation area is approved for use at that specific unit, but it may not be approved for use at other Minnesota state parks and recreations areas,” said Ed Quinn, natural resource program supervisor for the Parks and Trails Division at the DNR. “If you have leftover firewood, be sure to check with park staff to determine whether it can be taken to any other campgrounds.”</p>
<p>When purchasing firewood, be sure the bundle label includes the county of harvest. If the wood is certified, the bundle label will also feature the logo of either the Minnesota Department of Agriculture or the USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.  Save the receipt, because it will be needed to show proof of purchase and labeled bundles to DNR staff upon request.  Individuals bringing non-approved firewood onto DNR lands are subject to confiscation of their firewood and a $100 penalty.</p>
<p>“Invasive species negatively impact forest ecosystems, scenic views and visitor experiences,” said Quinn. “That’s why it’s so important for everyone to do their part and bring only firewood approved for each specific campground or picnic area they visit.”</p>
<p>For more information, visit <a href="http://links.govdelivery.com:80/track?type=click&amp;enid=ZWFzPTEmbWFpbGluZ2lkPTIwMTgwNTE0Ljg5NzE3MTExJm1lc3NhZ2VpZD1NREItUFJELUJVTC0yMDE4MDUxNC44OTcxNzExMSZkYXRhYmFzZWlkPTEwMDEmc2VyaWFsPTE3NTE3Njc4JmVtYWlsaWQ9anVsaWUuZm9yc3RlckBzdGF0ZS5tbi51cyZ1c2VyaWQ9anVsaWUuZm9yc3RlckBzdGF0ZS5tbi51cyZmbD0mZXh0cmE9TXVsdGl2YXJpYXRlSWQ9JiYm&amp;&amp;&amp;108&amp;&amp;&amp;http://www.mndnr.gov/firewood?utm_content=&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_name=&amp;utm_source=govdelivery&amp;utm_term=">www.mndnr.gov/firewood</a> or contact the DNR Information Center by emailing <a href="mailto:info.dnr@state.mn.us">info.dnr@state.mn.us</a> or by calling 888-646-6367 (8 a.m.-8 p.m. Monday through Friday, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturday).</p>
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		<title>Apply to hunt elk in Minnesota</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/05/14/apply-to-hunt-elk-in-minnesota-2/</link>
		<pubDate>Mon, 14 May 2018 17:05:23 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Hunting]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Wildlife]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=20797</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[Help manage elk populations Hunters have through Friday, June 15, to apply for one of 22 elk licenses offered this year by the Department of Natural Resources. Elk hunting is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for Minnesota residents.  “A number of antlerless-only &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/05/14/apply-to-hunt-elk-in-minnesota-2/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p><em>Help manage elk populations</em></p>
<p>Hunters have through Friday, June 15, to apply for one of 22 elk licenses offered this year by the Department of Natural Resources. Elk hunting is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for Minnesota residents. <span id="more-20797"></span></p>
<p>“A number of antlerless-only elk licenses are being offered this year for the Kittson-Central herd to reduce that population,” said Erik Thorson, DNR acting big game program leader. “Our latest survey counted 75 elk in this herd, which is above the population goal of 50 to 60 identified in the elk management plan.”</p>
<p>Licenses will be available for three elk seasons in Kittson County’s central zone and just the first season in the northeast zone. The Grygla area elk zone will not be open to hunting in 2018 because that area’s elk population remains below the population goal.</p>
<p>The first 2018 elk season (A) runs from Saturday, Sept. 8, to Sunday, Sept. 16, in both open elk hunt zones. Two either-sex licenses and five antlerless-only elk licenses will be available in the Kittson County central zone (zone 20) and two bulls-only licenses will be available in the Kittson County northeast zone (zone 30).</p>
<p>The second 2018 elk season (B) runs from Saturday, Sept. 22, to Sunday, Sept. 30. One either-sex license and six antlerless-only elk licenses will be available in just the Kittson County central zone. The third 2018 elk season (C) runs from Saturday, Oct. 6, to Sunday, Oct. 14. One either-sex license and five antlerless-only elk licenses will be available in the Kittson County central zone.</p>
<p>Hunters may apply individually or in parties of two at any DNR license agent, the DNR License Center at 500 Lafayette Road in St. Paul, <a href="http://links.govdelivery.com:80/track?type=click&amp;enid=ZWFzPTEmbWFpbGluZ2lkPTIwMTgwNTE0Ljg5NzE3MTExJm1lc3NhZ2VpZD1NREItUFJELUJVTC0yMDE4MDUxNC44OTcxNzExMSZkYXRhYmFzZWlkPTEwMDEmc2VyaWFsPTE3NTE3Njc4JmVtYWlsaWQ9anVsaWUuZm9yc3RlckBzdGF0ZS5tbi51cyZ1c2VyaWQ9anVsaWUuZm9yc3RlckBzdGF0ZS5tbi51cyZmbD0mZXh0cmE9TXVsdGl2YXJpYXRlSWQ9JiYm&amp;&amp;&amp;103&amp;&amp;&amp;http://www.mndnr.gov/buyalicense?utm_content=&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_name=&amp;utm_source=govdelivery&amp;utm_term=">mndnr.gov/buyalicense</a> or by telephone at 888-665-4236. There is a nonrefundable application fee of $4 per hunter and applicants should use Code 625. The license fee is $287. Hunters will have to select a zone and season when applying. Hunting information including maps of the elk hunting zones is at <a href="http://links.govdelivery.com:80/track?type=click&amp;enid=ZWFzPTEmbWFpbGluZ2lkPTIwMTgwNTE0Ljg5NzE3MTExJm1lc3NhZ2VpZD1NREItUFJELUJVTC0yMDE4MDUxNC44OTcxNzExMSZkYXRhYmFzZWlkPTEwMDEmc2VyaWFsPTE3NTE3Njc4JmVtYWlsaWQ9anVsaWUuZm9yc3RlckBzdGF0ZS5tbi51cyZ1c2VyaWQ9anVsaWUuZm9yc3RlckBzdGF0ZS5tbi51cyZmbD0mZXh0cmE9TXVsdGl2YXJpYXRlSWQ9JiYm&amp;&amp;&amp;104&amp;&amp;&amp;http://www.mndnr.gov/hunting/elk?utm_content=&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_name=&amp;utm_source=govdelivery&amp;utm_term=">mndnr.gov/hunting/elk</a>.</p>
<p>Although the northwestern Minnesota radio-collared elk research is ending this summer, the DNR will use research findings to inform management decisions.</p>
<p>Applicants should be aware that license purchasers will be required to attend a mandatory orientation session prior to their hunt, register their elk in person and provide biological samples from any harvested animals.</p>
<p>More information on Minnesota’s current elk herd and ongoing studies exploring the feasibility of reintroducing elk to northeastern Minnesota in the future can be found at <a href="http://links.govdelivery.com:80/track?type=click&amp;enid=ZWFzPTEmbWFpbGluZ2lkPTIwMTgwNTE0Ljg5NzE3MTExJm1lc3NhZ2VpZD1NREItUFJELUJVTC0yMDE4MDUxNC44OTcxNzExMSZkYXRhYmFzZWlkPTEwMDEmc2VyaWFsPTE3NTE3Njc4JmVtYWlsaWQ9anVsaWUuZm9yc3RlckBzdGF0ZS5tbi51cyZ1c2VyaWQ9anVsaWUuZm9yc3RlckBzdGF0ZS5tbi51cyZmbD0mZXh0cmE9TXVsdGl2YXJpYXRlSWQ9JiYm&amp;&amp;&amp;105&amp;&amp;&amp;http://www.mndnr.gov/elk?utm_content=&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_name=&amp;utm_source=govdelivery&amp;utm_term=">mndnr.gov/elk</a> and <a href="http://links.govdelivery.com:80/track?type=click&amp;enid=ZWFzPTEmbWFpbGluZ2lkPTIwMTgwNTE0Ljg5NzE3MTExJm1lc3NhZ2VpZD1NREItUFJELUJVTC0yMDE4MDUxNC44OTcxNzExMSZkYXRhYmFzZWlkPTEwMDEmc2VyaWFsPTE3NTE3Njc4JmVtYWlsaWQ9anVsaWUuZm9yc3RlckBzdGF0ZS5tbi51cyZ1c2VyaWQ9anVsaWUuZm9yc3RlckBzdGF0ZS5tbi51cyZmbD0mZXh0cmE9TXVsdGl2YXJpYXRlSWQ9JiYm&amp;&amp;&amp;106&amp;&amp;&amp;http://elk.umn.edu?utm_content=&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_name=&amp;utm_source=govdelivery&amp;utm_term=">elk.umn.edu</a>.</p>
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		<title>Minnesota Twins and DNR offer free hats</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/05/14/minnesota-twins-and-dnr-offer-free-hats/</link>
		<pubDate>Mon, 14 May 2018 17:04:04 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fish and Wildlife]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fishing]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Hunting]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=20794</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[Anyone with a 2018 Minnesota fishing or hunting license can receive a free camouflage and blaze orange Twins logo cap thanks to a special ticket offer online at mndnr.gov/twins, with games on select dates from May through September.  “That fishing &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/05/14/minnesota-twins-and-dnr-offer-free-hats/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Anyone with a 2018 Minnesota fishing or hunting license can receive a free camouflage and blaze orange Twins logo cap thanks to a special ticket offer online at <a href="http://www.mndnr.gov/twins">mndnr.gov/twins</a>, with games on select dates from May through September. <span id="more-20794"></span></p>
<p><img class="alignleft size-medium wp-image-20795" src="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/-14-300x217." alt="" width="300" height="217" srcset="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/-14-300x217. 300w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/-14-75x54. 75w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/-14-768x556. 768w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/-14-600x434. 600w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/-14 1160w" sizes="(max-width: 300px) 100vw, 300px" />“That fishing and hunting license has a lot of meaning – not only as a gateway to adventure but also as a way to support conservation,” said Jenifer Wical, marketing coordinator with the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. “Thank you to everyone who buys a license and we hope you enjoy this special offer from us and the Minnesota Twins.”</p>
<p>As part of the Minnesota DNR Days partnership with the Twins, license holders can purchase a reserved game ticket and receive a special Twins cap at these games:</p>
<ul>
<li>Sunday, May 20, Milwaukee Brewers, 1:10 p.m.</li>
<li>Saturday, June 2, Cleveland Indians, 3:10 p.m.</li>
<li>Sunday, June 24, Texas Rangers, 1:10 p.m.</li>
<li>Sunday, July 15, Tampa Bay Rays, 1:10 p.m.</li>
<li>Saturday, Aug. 25, Oakland Athletics, 6:10 p.m.</li>
<li>Saturday, Sept. 8, Kansas City Royals, 6:10 p.m</li>
</ul>
<p>Ticket prices vary by game and seat locations are either in the Field Box or Home Run Porch sections. All ticket holders under this partnership will pick up their cap at the game. Instructions for purchasing tickets are at <a href="http://www.mndnr.gov/twins">mndnr.gov/twins</a>.</p>
<p>Buy fishing and hunting licenses at any DNR license agent, online with a mobile or desktop device at <a href="http://www.mndnr.gov/buyalicense">mndnr.gov/buyalicense</a>, or by phone at 888-665-4236. Mobile buyers receive a text or email that serves as proof of a valid fish or game license to state conservation officers.</p>
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		<title>Walleye egg take a success despite squeeze of late ice-out</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/05/10/walleye-egg-take-a-success-despite-squeeze-of-late-ice-out/</link>
		<pubDate>Thu, 10 May 2018 18:52:29 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fish and Wildlife]]></category>
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		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=20790</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[This spring’s late ice-out meant a shorter window of time for the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources to take walleye eggs for annual fish stocking but despite a two-week late start the agency collected enough eggs to meet stocking goals.  &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/05/10/walleye-egg-take-a-success-despite-squeeze-of-late-ice-out/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>This spring’s late ice-out meant a shorter window of time for the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources to take walleye eggs for annual fish stocking but despite a two-week late start the agency collected enough eggs to meet stocking goals. <span id="more-20790"></span></p>
<p><img class="alignleft size-medium wp-image-20791" src="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/-13-300x225." alt="" width="300" height="225" srcset="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/-13-300x225. 300w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/-13-75x56. 75w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/-13-768x576. 768w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/-13-600x450. 600w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/-13 1280w" sizes="(max-width: 300px) 100vw, 300px" />“Our crews put in some extra-long days to handle the high numbers of fish this year,” said Chris Kavanaugh, northeast region fisheries manager. “Their work will benefit anglers who fish many of the more than 1,000 lakes stocked with walleyes by DNR.”</p>
<p>This year’s 10 egg-take operations met their goal of collecting 4,100 quarts of eggs. With each quart containing an estimated 120,000 eggs, that’s about 492 million walleye eggs and is comparable to the average taken in past years.</p>
<p>The DNR operates the largest walleye hatchery operation in the United States, and stocks 1,050 managed lakes on a rotating schedule that is prescribed by individual lake management plans.</p>
<p>After taking eggs and fertilizing them with walleye milt, the eggs are taken to hatcheries where they take about three weeks to hatch in specialized jars. Two-thirds of the fry are stocked directly into lakes within a few days of hatching. Roughly one-third of the fry hatched each year by the DNR are kept in rearing ponds throughout the summer and are stocked as fingerlings in the fall. It takes 3 to 4 years for a walleye to reach keeper size in Minnesota – about 14 to 15 inches.</p>
<p>A vast majority of the walleye caught by Minnesota anglers come from waters where the fish reproduce naturally – about 260 larger walleye lakes and in large rivers. But because of stocking, walleye can be found in an additional 1,050 Minnesota lakes spread throughout the state. This year’s walleye fishing season opens Saturday, May 12.</p>
<p>“Without good water quality, natural habitat and a healthy prey base, even aggressive stocking measures won’t improve walleye fishing on a lake that can’t support it,” Kavanaugh said.</p>
<p>In this season of egg-take operations Cut Foot Sioux near Deer River and Pike River near Tower experienced large numbers of fish in the traps after the first day and both operations were able to meet their goals in three days instead of the normal 6 to 8 days.</p>
<p>Spawning is a naturally stressful activity for fish. Egg take operations are staffed 24 hours a day so dissolved oxygen levels in the water and crowding can be monitored to minimize fish losses.</p>
<p>Fish spawning is triggered by day length and water temperature. The Pike River site has dark water that warms more quickly when the sun shines. Once the ice went out, water temperatures rose and the fish responded very quickly.</p>
<p>This year’s late ice-out could offer a silver lining for future fish numbers and anglers. Later ice-outs followed by consistently rising daily temperatures can be beneficial to developing a strong year class of walleyes. Consistently warming temperatures help create a surge in the zooplankton that provide an important food source for newly hatched fish.</p>
<p>The DNR’s fish hatchery operations are primarily funded by the Game and Fish Fund through fishing license revenues. Anglers can further support walleye management activities by purchasing a walleye stamp when they purchase a fishing license. They and fishing licenses are available for purchase at <a href="http://www.mndnr.gov/buyalicense?utm_content=&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_name=&amp;utm_source=govdelivery&amp;utm_term=">mndnr.gov/buyalicense</a>.</p>
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		<title>Lake Sarah egg take finished for 2018, genetic experiment continues</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/05/10/lake-sarah-egg-take-finished-for-2018-genetic-experiment-continues/</link>
		<pubDate>Thu, 10 May 2018 18:43:07 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
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		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=20786</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[Research continues into southern Minnesota’s premiere walleye fishery For decades, Murray County’s Lake Sarah has been southern Minnesota’s premiere walleye fishery, but it could also hold the key to how Department of Natural Resources fisheries crews stock walleyes for decades &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/05/10/lake-sarah-egg-take-finished-for-2018-genetic-experiment-continues/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p><em>Research continues into southern Minnesota’s premiere walleye fishery</em></p>
<p>For decades, Murray County’s Lake Sarah has been southern Minnesota’s premiere walleye fishery, but it could also hold the key to how Department of Natural Resources fisheries crews stock walleyes for decades to come in southwest Minnesota. <span id="more-20786"></span></p>
<p><img class="alignleft size-medium wp-image-20787" src="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/-12-284x300." alt="" width="284" height="300" srcset="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/-12-284x300. 284w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/-12-71x75. 71w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/-12-768x813. 768w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/-12-567x600. 567w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/-12 810w" sizes="(max-width: 284px) 100vw, 284px" />DNR stocking programs are an important piece to the state’s overall fisheries management. It’s how DNR fisheries staff augment existing populations or help establish fisheries that didn’t previously exist. Fisheries crews introduce fingerlings, which are yearling fish that are just a few inches long, or newly-hatched fry to lakes throughout the state.</p>
<p>While many other lakes require stocking programs to enhance the fish population, Lake Sarah’s walleye fishery hasn’t needed outside help in more than a quarter-century. As anglers enjoyed reeling in walleye over the years, DNR scientists began investigating why this fishery supported itself while many others needed stocking to supplement the walleye population.</p>
<p>In the last decade, DNA testing revealed a unique strain of walleye genetics that were unique to Lake Sarah. Those genes can be traced back to the Waterville hatchery, which stocked Lake Sarah with walleyes from the Cannon River watershed and other southern Minnesota sources back in the late 1980s and early 1990s.</p>
<p>“We’re using this lake to hopefully create other fisheries just like Lake Sarah,” said Ryan Doorenbos, DNR Windom area fisheries supervisor. “This could be the key to self-sustaining walleye fisheries throughout the southern part of the state.”</p>
<p>That’s significant, according to assistant regional fisheries manager Brian Schultz, because a self-sustaining walleye population is preferable, especially in a region that was once thought to have scarce habitat suitable for natural walleye reproduction.</p>
<p>“Our stocking programs are important,” said Schultz. “But, natural reproduction is always preferred whenever possible, so if we have fewer lakes that require stocking, it’s an added benefit of cost savings each year.”</p>
<p>This year’s take on Lake Sarah yielded 136 quarts of walleye eggs during the first week of May. Those eggs were sent to the DNR fisheries hatchery in Waterville. While some of the walleye fry hatched there will be headed back to Lake Sarah, most of them will be used to augment the walleye populations in other southern Minnesota lakes, with the hope of creating a naturally reproducing walleye fishery elsewhere.</p>
<p>Fisheries crews take genetic samples of each walleye parent used in the Lake Sarah egg take. Those genetic samples will be compared to future generations of walleye brood in stocked lakes elsewhere, and will ultimately reveal whether the unique walleye strain is successful outside of Lake Sarah. While this is the fourth year DNR staff have used Lake Sarah walleye, anglers shouldn’t expect immediate results in another lake.</p>
<p>“It may be several more years, or even a decade before a significant walleye population is found elsewhere,” Schultz said. “A walleye is able to reproduce at three to four years old in the southern part of the state, so this is a project that will take some time.”</p>
<p>It’s still unknown exactly what’s behind Lake Sarah’s success, but the hope is that research will eventually reveal whether it’s a unique aspect to Lake Sarah’s aquatic habitat or simply a hardy trait hidden in the walleye strain’s genes. Either scenario will help DNR fisheries crews in their quest to create better walleye fisheries throughout the state’s southern region, which will also produce better opportunities for anglers, too.</p>
<p>For more about DNR’s work in the Windom area, visit the <a href="http://mndnr.gov/areas/fisheries/windom/index.html">Windom area fisheries page</a>.</p>
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		<title>Camping season begins May 11 at Lake Vermilion-Soudan Underground Mine State Park</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/05/10/camping-season-begins-may-11-at-lake-vermilion-soudan-underground-mine-state-park/</link>
		<pubDate>Thu, 10 May 2018 18:32:16 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
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		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=20783</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[The campground at Minnesota’s newest state park will open Friday, May 11, according to the Department of Natural Resources.  With electricity and Wi-Fi at all 33 campsites and three large group camps with screened picnic shelters and modern shower buildings, &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/05/10/camping-season-begins-may-11-at-lake-vermilion-soudan-underground-mine-state-park/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>The campground at Minnesota’s newest state park will open Friday, May 11, according to the Department of Natural Resources. <span id="more-20783"></span></p>
<p><img class="alignleft size-medium wp-image-20784" src="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/-11-300x169." alt="" width="300" height="169" srcset="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/-11-300x169. 300w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/-11-75x42. 75w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/-11-768x432. 768w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/-11-600x338. 600w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/-11 1109w" sizes="(max-width: 300px) 100vw, 300px" />With electricity and Wi-Fi at all 33 campsites and three large group camps with screened picnic shelters and modern shower buildings, Vermilion Ridge Campground at Lake Vermilion-Soudan Underground Mine State Park in northeastern Minnesota will be a popular destination this summer.</p>
<p>Although the campground partially opened for the fall color season from Sept. 12 to Oct. 21, the official grand opening is yet to come.</p>
<p>“Weekends booked up quickly when we started taking reservations last fall, but there are still many openings in the group camps and on weeknights for those who want to stay overnight at the park this summer,” said Jim Essig, the park manager. “And, of course, there’s lots to do here besides camp.”</p>
<p>A ribbon-cutting celebration at 11 a.m. Thursday, June 7, will kick off a weekend of special activities, to include:</p>
<ul>
<li>A nature cart (10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.) and campfire program (8:30- 10:30 p.m.) Thursday, June 7.</li>
<li>A night sky program (8:30-10:30 p.m.) Friday, June 8.</li>
<li>A geology walking tour (9:30-11 a.m.) and Canoeing 101 (1-3 p.m., call 218-300-7005 for reservations) on Saturday, June 9.</li>
</ul>
<p>Visitors can enjoy fishing and boating on Lake Vermilion, having a picnic with a view of Armstrong Bay, taking an underground mine tour, finding the geocache hidden in the park (GPS units available at the park), attending interpretive programs, and hiking or biking a freshly paved segment of the Mesabi Trail into town.</p>
<p>Reservations are required for camping and recommended for the underground mine tours. To reserve a spot, visit <a href="http://www.mndnr.gov/reservations">www.mndnr.gov/reservations</a> or call 866-857-2757.</p>
<p>For more information, visit the <a href="http://www.mndnr.gov/vermilionsoudan">Vermilion-Soudan</a> page or call the DNR Info Center: 888-646-6367 (8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday-Friday, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday).</p>
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		<title>Cold water can be a killer; DNR urges opening-day anglers to be prepared</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/05/10/cold-water-can-be-a-killer-dnr-urges-opening-day-anglers-to-be-prepared/</link>
		<pubDate>Thu, 10 May 2018 18:27:39 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
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		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=20781</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[It remains to be seen how the fish cooperate on Saturday’s fishing opener, but one thing is clear: With the ice having just left most lakes, the water will be cold, according to the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.   That &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/05/10/cold-water-can-be-a-killer-dnr-urges-opening-day-anglers-to-be-prepared/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>It remains to be seen how the fish cooperate on Saturday’s fishing opener, but one thing is clear: With the ice having just left most lakes, the water will be cold, according to the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.  <span id="more-20781"></span><br />
That means anglers and anyone else who head onto the water should take extra precautions to prevent their trip from turning into a disaster.</p>
<p>“Falling into cold water causes an involuntary gasp and water inhalation, and even people who are strong swimmers can become incapacitated quickly,” said Lisa Dugan, DNR boat and water safety outreach coordinator. “Wearing a life jacket gives people a fighting chance if they fall into frigid water.”</p>
<p>More than 30 percent of all boating fatalities in Minnesota take place in cold water, and in nearly all instances victims were not wearing life jackets. But it isn’t enough just to have a life jacket in the boat – people need to wear them.</p>
<p>Falls overboard and capsizing are the most common causes of boating fatalities. And while wearing a life jacket is the one action that’s most likely to help boaters survive a fall into cold water, there are other steps anglers can take to help ensure they return to shore at the end of the day.</p>
<p>Anglers should head out with a friend or, at the very least, let people know where they are headed and what time they plan to return. Additionally, anglers can reduce their chances of tripping and falling into the water by keeping the floor of the boat free of coolers, tackle boxes and rods and reels.</p>
<p>“Nobody wants to step on and break an expensive fishing rod but trying to avoid doing so could lead anglers to lose their balance and fall overboard,” Dugan said. “Better to store extra rods in a rod locker or some other spot where they won’t be a potential hazard.”</p>
<p>For more tips on staying safe in cold water, go to the <a href="http://www.mndnr.gov/safety/boatwater/cold-water.html">cold water</a> page.</p>
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		<title>Drop the drone during fire season</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/05/10/drop-the-drone-during-fire-season/</link>
		<pubDate>Thu, 10 May 2018 18:22:27 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
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		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=20779</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[Now that spring wildfire season is here, the Department of Natural Resources reminds recreational drone pilots to ground their gear during wildfires.  Flying a drone over a wildfire isn’t just dangerous, it’s illegal: Federal law prohibits interfering with firefighting operations, &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/05/10/drop-the-drone-during-fire-season/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Now that spring wildfire season is here, the Department of Natural Resources reminds recreational drone pilots to ground their gear during wildfires. <span id="more-20779"></span></p>
<p>Flying a drone over a wildfire isn’t just dangerous, it’s illegal: Federal law prohibits interfering with firefighting operations, and that includes flying a drone over a wildfire.</p>
<p>“Drones can collide with firefighting aircraft, which can cause a serious or fatal injury,” said DNR wildfire section manager Paul Lundgren. “If we see a drone over a wildfire, we have to land our firefighting aircraft until we get the drone out of there—and that costs us precious time in suppressing the wildfire.”</p>
<p>This happened recently during a wildfire in Little Falls: DNR pilots had to land firefighting helicopters because a drone was buzzing overhead.</p>
<p>The reason drones pose such a problem is because they fly at roughly the same altitude as wildfire suppression aircraft—and even a small drone can cause a fire-fighting helicopter to crash if the drone makes contact with the aircraft.</p>
<p>For more information about drones and wildfires, log onto the <a href="http://www.nifc.gov/drones/outreach.html">National Interagency Fire Center</a>.</p>
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		<title>Spring is a good time to review dock and dock platform regulations</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/05/10/spring-is-a-good-time-to-review-dock-and-dock-platform-regulations/</link>
		<pubDate>Thu, 10 May 2018 18:17:19 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
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		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=20777</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[Before installing or investing in a new dock or dock platform, lake home and cabin owners should check to ensure it will meet state requirements, the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources said. Lake service provider businesses should review the regulations, &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/05/10/spring-is-a-good-time-to-review-dock-and-dock-platform-regulations/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Before installing or investing in a new dock or dock platform, lake home and cabin owners should check to ensure it will meet state requirements, the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources said. Lake service provider businesses should review the regulations, to ensure the equipment they sell or install is in compliance.  <span id="more-20777"></span></p>
<p>“The current dock and dock platform regulations have been in existence for many years, but not everyone is familiar with them,” said Jack Gleason, DNR public waters hydrologist.</p>
<p>“Residents might assume that if another lakeshore owner has a dock with a large platform, it meets the rules for the state,” Gleason said. “Sometimes, that isn’t the case. We want residents to understand the requirements before they purchase and install dock sections, rather than telling them later that they need to remove an already-installed structure.”</p>
<p>Dock and dock platform size are regulated to provide a balance between the protection and use of public waters. Extensive dock systems may shade out important aquatic plants and eliminate critical habitat where fish spawn, feed, grow and find shelter from predators.</p>
<p>A dock may not be more than 8 feet wide and may not be combined with other similar structures to create a wider dock.</p>
<p>A modest platform at the lake end of a dock is allowed under certain conditions. A single, temporary platform up to 120 square feet measured separately from the access dock, or 170 square feet including the area of the adjacent access dock, is allowed if the following conditions exist:</p>
<ul>
<li>The access dock must be 5 feet wide or less, and</li>
<li>The dock must be on a lake with a shoreland classification of general development or recreational development.</li>
</ul>
<p>Docks must not be a hazard to navigation, health or safety and must allow the free flow of water. A dock should not close off part of the lake to other users. Docks must also comply with any local ordinances.</p>
<p>A document about state dock requirements is available on the <a href="https://files.dnr.state.mn.us/publications/waters/shoreline_alterations_water_access.pdf">DNR website</a>. Also find <a href="https://files.dnr.state.mn.us/waters/area_hydros.pdf">DNR hydrologists</a> who can assist lake home owners with questions.</p>
<p>The DNR website also contains links to other helpful information for lakeshore owners about shoreline erosion control and restoration projects to help improve water quality and fish and wildlife habitat.</p>
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		<title>Minnesota anglers and boaters need to pay attention to aquatic invasive species laws</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/05/10/minnesota-anglers-and-boaters-need-to-continue-to-pay-attention-to-aquatic-invasive-species-laws/</link>
		<pubDate>Thu, 10 May 2018 18:15:09 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Aquatic Invasive Species]]></category>
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		<category><![CDATA[Fish and Wildlife]]></category>
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		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=20775</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[This weekend’s fishing opener comes with a reminder for Minnesotans to continue to follow the laws to prevent the spread of aquatic invasive species, according to the Department of Natural Resources.  Last year, compliance surpassed 97 percent at more than &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/05/10/minnesota-anglers-and-boaters-need-to-continue-to-pay-attention-to-aquatic-invasive-species-laws/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>This weekend’s fishing opener comes with a reminder for Minnesotans to continue to follow the laws to prevent the spread of aquatic invasive species, according to the Department of Natural Resources. <span id="more-20775"></span></p>
<p>Last year, compliance surpassed 97 percent at more than 450,000 watercraft inspections.<br />
DNR Enforcement officers are seeing a steady increase in the number of people who know and follow aquatic invasive species laws.</p>
<p>“Nearly all Minnesota anglers and boaters are taking the three simple steps: clean, drain, dispose,” said DNR Enforcement Operations Manager Jackie Glaser. “It’s not only the best way to prevent the spread of aquatic invasive species, but it’s also the law in Minnesota.”</p>
<p>Boaters and anglers are reminded to:</p>
<ul>
<li><strong>Clean</strong> aquatic plants and debris from watercraft,</li>
<li><strong>Drain</strong> lake or river water and keep drain plugs out during transport,</li>
<li><strong>Dispose</strong> of unwanted bait in the trash, not in the water.”</li>
</ul>
<p>In addition to these steps, especially after leaving infested waters, the DNR recommends that anglers:</p>
<ul>
<li>Spray boat and trailer with high-pressure water;</li>
<li>Rinse boat and trailer with hot water (120° for two minutes; or 140° for 10 seconds); or</li>
<li>Dry boat and equipment for at least five days.</li>
</ul>
<p>More information is available on the <a href="http://www.mndnr.gov/AIS">aquatic invasive species</a> page.</p>
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		<title>New round of shooting range grants available</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/05/10/new-round-of-shooting-range-grants-available/</link>
		<pubDate>Thu, 10 May 2018 18:07:36 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
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		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=20770</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources has announced the availability of $330,000 in shooting range grants to build or improve trap, skeet, rifle, pistol or five-stand shooting ranges in the state. The application period opens May 15 and closes June &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/05/10/new-round-of-shooting-range-grants-available/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources has announced the availability of $330,000 in shooting range grants to build or improve trap, skeet, rifle, pistol or five-stand shooting ranges in the state. The application period opens May 15 and closes June 29. <span id="more-20770"></span></p>
<p>“There’s been a surge in interest in shooting sports in Minnesota and across the United States, and these grants have helped shooting ranges throughout the state expand, improve or upgrade their facilities and give more and more people a place to shoot,” said Chuck Niska, DNR shooting range program coordinator.</p>
<p>Shooting clubs that allow members of the public to shoot at reasonable times and for a reasonable fee are eligible for the grants, which require a one-to-one match.</p>
<p>There are two levels of grants available: <a href="https://www.dnr.state.mn.us/grants/recreation/rangedev3.html?utm_content=&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_name=&amp;utm_source=govdelivery&amp;utm_term=">Small grants</a>, which are between $2,500 and $25,000, and <a href="https://www.dnr.state.mn.us/grants/recreation/rangedev4.html?utm_content=&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_name=&amp;utm_source=govdelivery&amp;utm_term=">large grants</a>, which are above $25,000. All grantees must verify current female participation data and show an intent to improve future diversity opportunities.</p>
<p>The $330,000 that’s available is from a $2 million appropriation the state Legislature made in 2015 to help recreational shooting clubs develop or improve shooting sports facilities for public use, with an emphasis on enhancing participation opportunities for youth.</p>
<p>So far, those grant dollars have been used as part of 60 projects throughout the state. Additionally, the DNR in 2014 used an appropriation from the Legislature to fund 102 grants totaling more than $1.6 million.</p>
<p>“Shooting sports are alive and well in Minnesota and we continue to see strong interest among shooting range operators who want to improve their facilities and make them available to even more people,” Niska said.</p>
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		<title>20 candidates begin training to join state conservation officer ranks</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/05/10/20767/</link>
		<pubDate>Thu, 10 May 2018 18:06:21 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Enforcement]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=20767</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[The 18th class of candidates to take part in the Department of Natural Resources’ Conservation Officer Academy has begun training at Camp Ripley. This year’s class includes 20 recruits with diverse backgrounds.  The officer candidates began training at Camp Ripley &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/05/10/20767/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p class="gdp" style="margin: 0in 0in 7.5pt 0in;"><span style="font-family: 'Calibri',sans-serif; color: black;">The 18th class of candidates to take part in the Department of Natural Resources’ Conservation Officer Academy has begun training at Camp Ripley. This year’s class includes 20 recruits with diverse backgrounds. </span><span id="more-20767"></span></p>
<p class="gdp" style="margin: 0in 0in 7.5pt 0in;"><span style="font-family: 'Calibri',sans-serif; color: black;"><img class="alignleft size-medium wp-image-20768" src="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/-10-300x114." alt="" width="300" height="114" srcset="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/-10-300x114. 300w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/-10-75x29. 75w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/-10-768x292. 768w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/-10-600x228. 600w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/-10 1080w" sizes="(max-width: 300px) 100vw, 300px" />The officer candidates began training at Camp Ripley on May 2 and will continue there until Aug. 14, learning about topics ranging from fish and wildlife laws to patrol procedures, rules of evidence to fish and wildlife investigation. Upon graduation, they’ll spend several months field training with experienced officers. The candidates will be stationed Dec. 4.</span></p>
<p class="gdp" style="margin: 0in 0in 7.5pt 0in;"><span style="font-family: 'Calibri',sans-serif; color: black;">“Conservation officers play a vital role in protecting natural resources and public safety in Minnesota,” said Rodmen Smith, director of the DNR Enforcement Division. “I’m confident this class of recruits will continue our proud tradition of enforcing natural resources and focusing on education and outreach as we serve the citizens of Minnesota.”</span></p>
<p class="gdp" style="margin: 0in 0in 7.5pt 0in;"><span style="font-family: 'Calibri',sans-serif; color: black;">Attendees of this year’s Academy bring with them a wide variety of experiences. Some have a traditional law enforcement background while others took part in a program called CO PREP, which provides candidates before the Academy with law enforcement training such that they’re eligible for Peace Officer Standards and Training certification. </span></p>
<p class="gdp" style="margin: 0in 0in 7.5pt 0in;"><span style="font-family: 'Calibri',sans-serif; color: black;">The Enforcement Division also is accepting applications through May 23 for CO PREP candidates for a planned Academy in 2019. More information on CO PREP and the application process is available on the <a style="-ms-word-break: break-all; word-break: break-word; -webkit-hyphens: none; -moz-hyphens: none; hyphens: none;" href="https://www.dnr.state.mn.us/enforcement/jobs/hiring.html?utm_content=&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_name=&amp;utm_source=govdelivery&amp;utm_term="><span style="color: #0062b2;">DNR website</span></a>.</span></p>
<p class="gdp" style="margin: 0in 0in 7.5pt 0in;"><span style="font-family: 'Calibri',sans-serif; color: black;">There are 155 conservation officer field stations in Minnesota. Each station covers about 650 square miles.</span></p>
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		<title>Lawmakers need to approve  urgent funding for DNR facilities</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/05/09/lawmakers-need-to-approve-urgent-funding-for-dnr-facilities/</link>
		<pubDate>Wed, 09 May 2018 19:20:35 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[State Parks]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Trails]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=20764</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[By Tom Landwehr Let’s imagine if you didn’t do routine maintenance on your house. The furnace tune up you missed turns into a broken heating system. The damp spot in your basement becomes a moldy, unhealthy mess. The small leak &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/05/09/lawmakers-need-to-approve-urgent-funding-for-dnr-facilities/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p><em>By Tom Landwehr</em></p>
<p>Let’s imagine if you didn’t do routine maintenance on your house.</p>
<p>The furnace tune up you missed turns into a broken heating system. The damp spot in your basement becomes a moldy, unhealthy mess. The small leak in your roof becomes a larger leak, ruining your furniture and your belongings inside. <span id="more-20764"></span></p>
<p>The Department of Natural Resources faces these maintenance issues daily – some small, some very large. All across the state, we have to do maintenance on buildings, forest roads and bridges, state trails, restrooms, boat accesses, and sewer systems. These are buildings and facilities used by thousands of Minnesotans, out-of-state visitors, and our staff – every day.  Last year more than 10 million people visited a Minnesota state park.</p>
<p>Unfortunately, due to lack of funding, the DNR’s maintenance program is far behind in keeping up with this maintenance, which jeopardizes your outdoor experiences and those visitors who rely on Minnesota for a world-class experience.</p>
<p>Unfortunately, too, the Minnesota Legislature is woefully behind in funding the DNR’s maintenance needs and hasn’t heeded Gov. Mark Dayton’s pleas to fix what we have.  As part of his 2018 Public Works bill, Dayton is asking the Legislature to invest $130 million in urgently needed improvements to the DNR’s buildings and other infrastructure. The House of Representatives this session has proposed $30 million for the DNR’s natural resources asset preservation; the Senate has not released its bonding proposal.</p>
<p>The DNR has been working – and talking publicly – about these issues for some time. You may have read about it in the media. The DNR has issued several plans for fixing its infrastructure, and according to a recently completed facility assessment, the agency has more than $35 million of building components that are in unacceptable or poor condition.</p>
<p>The DNR also has hundreds of millions of dollars of other investments needed over the next decade to prevent asset failures like the broken water line at Jay Cooke State Park near Duluth, one of the many urgent maintenance needs the agency faces.</p>
<p>Repair costs increase about 8 percent annually, so addressing these problems now saves the state money over the long term.</p>
<p>The 10-year capital needs report shows 192 of the agency’s inventory of 2,700 buildings are in crisis or unacceptable condition, and 520 are in poor condition. Some DNR forest road or trail bridges are weight restricted due to structural deterioration over time – meaning logging trucks and grooming vehicles can’t use them.</p>
<p>Other types of infrastructure needed to support DNR recreation programs also require repair. The DNR needs to make critical repairs to its fish hatcheries, including one near Lanesboro that supplies thousands of trout for anglers. Many water control structures – used at wildlife management areas to maintain water levels for waterfowl – are more than four decades old and need to be fixed.</p>
<p>More than 100 miles of state trails are in need of repairs; some are in such poor condition that bicyclists avoid crumbling and rutted sections entirely.  The agency is hoping to secure bonding funds for resurfacing, culvert and bridge replacements, and accessibility improvements for the Sakatah, Root River, Gateway, Willard Munger, and Blufflands state trails.</p>
<p>As I’ve said before, some of these fixes are for basic services for people—access to clean drinking water and functional bathrooms—that are now not being met at DNR facilities. Most people would agree that it’s unacceptable to have substandard facilities in a state whose $13 billion tourism economy is based on high-quality outdoor recreation opportunities.</p>
<p>Time is running out in this legislative session. Please urge your lawmakers to take action on a bonding bill that supports outdoors recreation and jobs for Minnesotans.</p>
<p><em>Landwehr is commissioner of the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.</em></p>
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		<title>Annual fishing closure near Pike River hatchery in effect to protect spawning fish</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/05/08/annual-fishing-closure-near-pike-river-hatchery-in-effect-to-protect-spawning-fish/</link>
		<pubDate>Tue, 08 May 2018 18:22:21 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[chzeppel]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Fisheries]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fishing]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Opener]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Region 2-NE]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Tower]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=20760</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[Anglers heading to Lake Vermilion will notice fishing closure signs for the Pike River near the seasonal Pike River hatchery operation. The temporary closure is enacted each spring from April 1 to May 30 to protect concentrations of spawning walleye that &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/05/08/annual-fishing-closure-near-pike-river-hatchery-in-effect-to-protect-spawning-fish/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Anglers heading to Lake Vermilion will notice fishing closure signs for the Pike River near the seasonal Pike River hatchery operation. The temporary closure is enacted each spring from April 1 to May 30 to protect concentrations of spawning walleye that may be vulnerable to over-harvest. <span id="more-20760"></span></p>
<p>The fishing closure extends from the Pike River Dam to the mouth of the river where it enters Pike Bay.  Signs are posted at the closed area.</p>
<p>Pike Bay on Lake Vermilion is <strong>not</strong> closed to fishing.</p>
<p>The protected slot requires that all walleyes from 20 to 26 inches be immediately released. Special regulations for pike require that all pike from 24 to 36 inches be immediately released.</p>
<p>Closures apply to fishing only; travel is permitted through these areas.</p>
<p>Questions can be directed to the DNR fisheries office in Tower at 218-300-7803, or to Edie Evarts, Tower area fisheries supervisor, at <a href="mailto:edie.evarts@state.mn.us">edie.evarts@state.mn.us</a>.</p>
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		<title>DNR considering changes to  walleye regulations on Leech Lake</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/05/08/dnr-considering-changes-to-walleye-regulations-on-leech-lake/</link>
		<pubDate>Tue, 08 May 2018 17:47:36 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fish and Wildlife]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fisheries]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fishing]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=20758</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[A proposal to allow anglers on Leech Lake in northwestern Minnesota more opportunity to keep walleye starting in 2019 will be up for consideration by the Department of Natural Resources.  “We’ve met or exceeded all of our walleye management objectives &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/05/08/dnr-considering-changes-to-walleye-regulations-on-leech-lake/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>A proposal to allow anglers on Leech Lake in northwestern Minnesota more opportunity to keep walleye starting in 2019 will be up for consideration by the Department of Natural Resources. <span id="more-20758"></span></p>
<p>“We’ve met or exceeded all of our walleye management objectives on Leech Lake in large part due to very consistent production of young walleyes over the past 10 years,” said Doug Schultz, DNR area fisheries supervisor. “For this reason we will be discussing potential relaxation of walleye regulations and asking for public comments on a proposal immediately after our fall survey work wraps up this September.”</p>
<p>Anglers will see yellow signs at public water accesses around Leech Lake on opening day, Saturday, May 12, notifying the public of the upcoming proposal. Details about a formal public comment period during the fall and ways to provide comment to the DNR on the proposal will be provided in the future.</p>
<p>The current regulation requires immediate release of all walleye 20 to 26 inches long with a possession limit of four fish, one of which can be longer than 26 inches. Any potential change would be effective for the 2019 fishing season, and such a change may be temporary based on future assessments of the fishery.</p>
<p>Find more information on the <a href="http://mndnr.gov/leechlake/index.html">Leech Lake management page</a>.</p>
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		<title>DNR&#8217;s big vision: a weekend full  of accessible outdoor adventures</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/05/08/dnrs-big-vision-a-weekend-full-of-accessible-outdoor-adventures/</link>
		<pubDate>Tue, 08 May 2018 15:51:42 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[State Parks]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Trails]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=20756</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[Department of Natural Resources Commissioner Tom Landwehr has a big vision for capital investment this year: to create a whole weekend of accessible infrastructure at one of Minnesota’s most visited state’s parks. The target of his ambition is William O’Brien &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/05/08/dnrs-big-vision-a-weekend-full-of-accessible-outdoor-adventures/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Department of Natural Resources Commissioner Tom Landwehr has a big vision for capital investment this year: to create a whole weekend of accessible infrastructure at one of Minnesota’s most visited state’s parks. The target of his ambition is William O’Brien State Park, located about 45 minutes northeast of St. Paul along the beautiful St Croix River. <span id="more-20756"></span></p>
<p>The park is known for its close-to-home camping, paddle-sports and bird-watching in the summer months, and for its hiking and cross country ski trails in the winter. If the Minnesota Legislature supports Landwehr’s vision, which was included in Gov. Mark Dayton’s bonding proposal earlier this year, a person using a wheelchair or other mobility device could:</p>
<ul>
<li>Explore core hiking trails within the park to watch the wildlife, geocache and enjoy St Croix River overlooks.</li>
<li>Camp or lodge at a site with accessible camping pads, fire rings and picnic tables located in a place that has wheelchair accessibility to all necessary amenities, like drinking water sources and bathrooms.</li>
<li> Picnic and play in a day-use area that has wheelchair accessible picnic shelters, pathways, bathrooms, and a nature play area.</li>
<li>Learn about Minnesota’s oak savanna habitat and the critters that call it home in a visitor center with accessible features and naturalist exhibits.</li>
<li> Enjoy water recreation through an accessible paddle sports launch area and fishing pier.</li>
</ul>
<p>“We want to create a whole weekend of outdoor fun that can be accessed seamlessly by all Minnesotans regardless of their physical abilities,” said Landwehr, who has advocated strongly during his administration for improving access for veterans and children, in particular. “We can start by providing a comprehensive, accessible outdoor recreation experience at one state park to demonstrate how it could look at other state parks and public lands.”</p>
<p>As the DNR upgrades its facilities through renovation and new construction projects to meet federal and state accessibility standards, this often results in stand-alone accessible features within a park. For example, at William O’Brien State Park, a newer ranger station near the park entrance, which was built after the 1990 passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), is accessible by visitors with wheelchairs. Other areas of the park, such as the older visitor center and facilities at the picnic and river access areas are not.</p>
<p>“The rehabilitation approach to accessibility has resulted in a patchwork of accessible buildings and recreation features throughout Minnesota’s outdoor recreation system,” Landwehr said. “Here, we’d like to create a seamless experience for people with varying physical abilities. Ultimately, we’d like to model this approach at William O’Brien so we can do this at several more of Minnesota’s most iconic natural areas.”</p>
<p>The Minnesota Council on Disability (MCD) has been advising the DNR on where accessibility improvements are needed and advocating for funding to make those improvements happen. Dayton included $10 million for the project in his statewide capital investment plan. The investment would take care of the needs at William O’Brien, as well as provide additional funding for some planning and design of accessibility improvements at other state parks across the state.</p>
<p>“This is a quality of life issue for people with disabilities,” said Joan Willshire, executive director of the MCD. “We know that outdoor recreation improves people’s lives in so many important ways. This investment in our state park facilities expands the reach of those outdoor recreation benefits to so many more Minnesotans. We’d love to see it expanded statewide.”</p>
<p>The MCD is advocating for $20 million to improve accessibility at Minnesota state parks over the next biennium, and has worked with legislators to author additional legislation supporting this big vision (HF3549 and SF2963).</p>
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		<title>Angler breaks state record for golden redhorse</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/05/07/angler-breaks-state-record-for-golden-redhorse/</link>
		<pubDate>Mon, 07 May 2018 19:18:59 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fish and Wildlife]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fisheries]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fishing]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Opener]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=20752</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[Angler Ethan Rasset has broken the state record for golden redhorse in the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources’ certified weight category.  Rasset caught the 4-pound, 8-ounce redhorse on the Otter Tail River after setting out April 7 with his fishing &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/05/07/angler-breaks-state-record-for-golden-redhorse/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Angler Ethan Rasset has broken the state record for golden redhorse in the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources’ certified weight category. <span id="more-20752"></span></p>
<p><img class="alignleft size-medium wp-image-20753" src="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/-9-202x300." alt="" width="202" height="300" srcset="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/-9-202x300. 202w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/-9-51x75. 51w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/-9-768x1139. 768w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/-9-404x600. 404w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/-9 1208w" sizes="(max-width: 202px) 100vw, 202px" />Rasset caught the 4-pound, 8-ounce redhorse on the Otter Tail River after setting out April 7 with his fishing buddies to lure some roughfish like carp into biting. His rod was rigged with a green artificial twister-tail bait with 15-pound test line when the fish hit in the early afternoon.</p>
<p>“I had to make one last cast into a spot where I knew there was a deep hole,” Rasset said. “I thought it was a greater or silver redhorse at first because of its size, but as I got it closer to shore and I saw it flicker I knew it was a big golden.”</p>
<p>Rasset took the fish to a store in Moorhead to get the fish weighed on a certified scale, where two observers witnessed the weighing. Two fisheries experts from the Fergus Falls DNR office confirmed that the species of the fish was in fact a golden redhorse.</p>
<p>The golden redhorse has been a popular record fish in the past few years with new state records broken in four of the last five years. In 2014, the record was set at 4 pounds, was broken in 2016 with a 4-pound 4-ounce fish; broken again in 2017 with a 4-pound 7-ounce fish; and now the new state record is Rasset’s golden redhorse weighing 4 pounds 8 ounces and measuring 22-1/2 inches in length and 12-3/4 inches in girth.</p>
<p>There are two kinds of Minnesota state records: one for catching and keeping the biggest fish in each species based on certified weight; and the other for the length of a caught and released muskellunge, northern pike, lake sturgeon or flathead catfish.</p>
<p>The DNR announces new state records in news releases, on social media and on the DNR website. Find current records and guidelines for each type of state record at <a href="http://www.mndnr.gov/recordfish">mndnr.gov/recordfish</a>.</p>
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		<title>Removing lake plants could require a permit</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/05/07/removing-lake-plants-could-require-a-permit-3/</link>
		<pubDate>Mon, 07 May 2018 19:16:57 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=20749</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[Lakeshore property owners are reminded that a permit may be required to remove aquatic plants, according to the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.  “We need plants to have healthy lakes and strong fish populations, it’s as simple as that,” said &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/05/07/removing-lake-plants-could-require-a-permit-3/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Lakeshore property owners are reminded that a permit may be required to remove aquatic plants, according to the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. <span id="more-20749"></span></p>
<p><img class="alignleft size-medium wp-image-20750" src="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/-8-300x169." alt="" width="300" height="169" srcset="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/-8-300x169. 300w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/-8-75x42. 75w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/-8-768x432. 768w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/-8-600x337. 600w" sizes="(max-width: 300px) 100vw, 300px" />“We need plants to have healthy lakes and strong fish populations, it’s as simple as that,” said Jon Hansen, DNR aquatic plant management consultant. “So each year we remind folks to let them grow but if they are set on removing plants, please check regulations to see if they need a permit.”</p>
<p>Aquatic plants provide food and shelter for fish, ducks and other wildlife. They stabilize the lake bottom, which helps maintain water clarity. These plants also protect shorelines from erosion by absorbing energy from waves and ice.</p>
<p>Additionally, the DNR is getting questions about devices that generate water current to blast muck and plants away.</p>
<p>“We refer to these devices as hydraulic jets and even though you can buy one, they cannot be used in any way that disturbs the bottom of the lake or uproots plants,” Hansen said.</p>
<p>Specific regulations govern what situations require permits for aquatic plant removal. Aquatic plant regulations and a guide to aquatic plants can be found at <a href="http://www.mndnr.gov/shorelandplants">mndnr.gov/shorelandplants</a>. To apply for a permit, visit the DNR’s permitting and reporting system at <a href="http://www.mndnr.gov/mpars">mndnr.gov/mpars</a>.</p>
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