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<channel>
	<title>MN Department of Natural Resources &#8212; News Releases</title>
	<atom:link href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/feed/" rel="self" type="application/rss+xml" />
	<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us</link>
	<description>MN Department of Natural Resources -- News Releases</description>
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		<title>Zebra mussel confirmed in East Loon Lake in Otter Tail County</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/07/19/zebra-mussel-confirmed-in-east-loon-lake-in-otter-tail-county/</link>
		<pubDate>Thu, 19 Jul 2018 21:31:52 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Aquatic Invasive Species]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fish and Wildlife]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fisheries]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=21001</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[Lake is connected to two others with zebra mussels The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources has confirmed a report of a zebra mussel in East Loon Lake in Otter Tail County. East Loon Lake is between and connected to East &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/07/19/zebra-mussel-confirmed-in-east-loon-lake-in-otter-tail-county/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p><em>Lake is connected to two others with zebra mussels</em></p>
<p>The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources has confirmed a report of a zebra mussel in East Loon Lake in Otter Tail County. East Loon Lake is between and connected to East Spirit Lake and Sybil Lake, both of which were confirmed as having zebra mussels in 2016. <span id="more-21001"></span></p>
<p>A lake user contacted the DNR after finding a single adult zebra mussel in East Loon Lake, which DNR specialists confirmed through photos and the specimen itself. No additional zebra mussels were found during a follow-up survey.</p>
<p>“It’s helpful that an alert individual contacted us when they suspected they’d found a zebra mussel,” DNR assistant invasive species specialist Mark Ranweiler said. “Because they kept the zebra mussel, we were able to confirm the species identification.”</p>
<p>Whether or not a lake is listed as infested, Minnesota law requires boaters and anglers to:</p>
<ul>
<li><strong>Clean</strong> watercraft and trailers of aquatic plants and prohibited invasive species,</li>
<li><strong>Drain</strong> all water by removing drain plugs and keeping them out during transport, and</li>
<li><strong>Dispose</strong> of unwanted bait in the trash.</li>
</ul>
<p>Some invasive species are small and difficult to see at the access. To remove or kill them, take one or more of the following precautions before moving to another waterbody:</p>
<ul>
<li>Spray with high-pressure water.</li>
<li>Rinse with very hot water (120 degrees for at least two minutes or 140 degrees for at least 10 seconds).</li>
<li>Dry for at least five days.</li>
</ul>
<p>Zebra mussels can compete with native species for food and habitat, cut the feet of swimmers, reduce the performance of boat motors, and cause expensive damage to water intake pipes.</p>
<p>People should <a href="http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/invasives/ais/contacts.html?utm_content=&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_name=&amp;utm_source=govdelivery&amp;utm_term=">contact an area DNR aquatic invasive species specialist</a> if they think they have found zebra mussels or any other invasive species.</p>
<p>More information is available at <a href="http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/invasives/aquatic/index.html?utm_content=&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_name=&amp;utm_source=govdelivery&amp;utm_term=">mndnr.gov/ais</a>.</p>
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		<title>DNR open house highlights Lake Vermilion northern pike regulation</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/07/19/dnr-open-house-highlights-lake-vermilion-northern-pike-regulation/</link>
		<pubDate>Thu, 19 Jul 2018 19:11:31 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fish and Wildlife]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fisheries]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fishing]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=20996</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[Anglers can play a role in a proposed fishing regulation change for northern pike on Lake Vermilion that would simplify northern pike regulations by bringing them in line with the new statewide zone regulation starting in May 2019.  Anyone who &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/07/19/dnr-open-house-highlights-lake-vermilion-northern-pike-regulation/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Anglers can play a role in a proposed fishing regulation change for northern pike on Lake Vermilion that would simplify northern pike regulations by bringing them in line with the new statewide zone regulation starting in May 2019. <span id="more-20996"></span></p>
<p>Anyone who wants to ask questions and give input about the regulation proposal can attend an open house scheduled by the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources for 6 to 8 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 22, at the Tower Civic Center, 402 Pine St., in Tower, Minn.</p>
<p>Lake Vermilion northern pike are currently managed under a special regulation that requires all pike from 24 to 36 inches long to be released and only one fish over 36 inches is allowed in a three-fish possession limit.</p>
<p>Under the northeast pike zone regulation, all fish from 30 to 40 inches long must be released and no more than one over 40 inches is allowed to be kept in a two fish possession limit.</p>
<p>Spearers would be allowed to take any size pike but would be allowed only one fish over 26 inches in the two fish possession limit.</p>
<p>“We are interested in the public’s preference about this because either regulation will help maintain the size of pike anglers enjoy on Lake Vermilion,” said Edie Evarts, Tower area fisheries supervisor. “Northern pike have done well and average size has increased under the special regulation that began in 2003. But a shift to the statewide zone regulation would simplify regulations while still protecting a portion of pike.”</p>
<p>Public comment on the pike regulation can be submitted through Wednesday, Sept. 26.</p>
<p>Questions or comments may be directed to the Tower area fisheries office, 650 Highway 169, Tower, MN 55790, by calling 218-300-7803, or emailing <a href="mailto:edie.evarts@state.mn.us">edie.evarts@state.mn.us</a>.</p>
<p>Additionally, an open house about this proposal and other fishing regulations under review is scheduled for 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Sept. 26 at the DNR Central Office, 500 Lafayette Road in St. Paul. Staff will take comments on this proposal and other fishing regulations under review around the state.</p>
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		<title>Zebra mussels confirmed in Bay Lake, Crow Wing County</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/07/19/zebra-mussels-confirmed-in-bay-lake-crow-wing-county/</link>
		<pubDate>Thu, 19 Jul 2018 19:07:39 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[chzeppel]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Aitkin]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Brainerd]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Lakes]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Region 2-NE]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=20998</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources has confirmed zebra mussels in Bay Lake, near Deerwood in Crow Wing County. Last fall, a lakeshore owner reported finding the shell of a dead zebra mussel, but additional searches with DNR zebra mussel &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/07/19/zebra-mussels-confirmed-in-bay-lake-crow-wing-county/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources has confirmed zebra mussels in Bay Lake, near Deerwood in Crow Wing County.</p>
<p>Last fall, a lakeshore owner reported finding the shell of a dead zebra mussel, but additional searches with DNR zebra mussel detection dogs could not confirm the presence of live specimens. Recently, a guest of another lakeshore owner reported finding a live specimen that a DNR invasive species specialist confirmed to be an adult zebra mussel. Additional water sampling showed the presence of veligers and in-lake searches confirmed a reproducing population of zebra mussels in Bay Lake.</p>
<p>“Most of the new zebra mussel reports are brought to our attention by people who are out using Minnesota’s public waters in the summer months,” said DNR invasive species specialist Tim Plude. “We appreciate the vigilance of folks reporting them to the DNR, as well as the partnerships we have with lakeshore owners.”</p>
<p>Signs at lake accesses have been updated to alert boaters to the presence of zebra mussels.</p>
<p>Zebra mussels are transported over land by human activity, and lake users can prevent their spread. It’s an important reminder to follow the state’s invasive species laws:<br />
• Clean watercraft of aquatic plants and prohibited invasive species,<br />
• Drain all water by removing drain plugs and keeping them out during transport, and<br />
• Dispose of unwanted bait in the trash.</p>
<p>The DNR also recommends boaters take one or more of the following precautions before moving to another waterbody:<br />
• Spray with high-pressure water.<br />
• Rinse with very hot water (120 degrees for at least two minutes or 140 degrees for at least 10 seconds).<br />
• Dry for leave least five days.</p>
<p>When transporting water-related equipment such as boat lifts, docks, swim rafts or associated equipment, Minnesota law requires a 21-day drying time to destroy attached organisms, before placing that equipment in another lake.</p>
<p>Zebra mussels are an invasive species that can compete with native species for food and habitat, cut the feet of swimmers, reduce the performance of boat motors, and cause expensive damage to water intake pipes.</p>
<p>People should <a href="http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/invasives/ais/contacts.html?utm_content=&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_name=&amp;utm_source=govdelivery&amp;utm_term=">contact an area DNR aquatic invasive species specialist</a> if they think they have found zebra mussels or any other invasive species.</p>
<p>More information is available at <a href="http://www.mndnr.gov/AIS">www.mndnr.gov/AIS</a>.</p>
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		<item>
		<title>Outdoor skills workshop for women scheduled for Sept. 14-16</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/07/16/outdoor-skills-workshop-for-women-scheduled-for-sept-14-16/</link>
		<pubDate>Mon, 16 Jul 2018 16:47:33 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fish and Wildlife]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fishing]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Hunting]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=20993</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[Women can hike to spectacular views of autumn colors and Lake Superior on the horizon during a three-day fall workshop that teaches a variety of outdoor skills through the Becoming an Outdoors Woman program of the Minnesota Department of Natural &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/07/16/outdoor-skills-workshop-for-women-scheduled-for-sept-14-16/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Women can hike to spectacular views of autumn colors and Lake Superior on the horizon during a three-day fall workshop that teaches a variety of outdoor skills through the Becoming an Outdoors Woman program of the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. <span id="more-20993"></span></p>
<img class="size-medium wp-image-20994" src="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/-4-220x300." alt="" width="220" height="300" srcset="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/-4-220x300. 220w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/-4-55x75. 55w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/-4-439x600. 439w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/-4 711w" sizes="(max-width: 220px) 100vw, 220px" />
<p>Getting to that view includes 330 feet of elevation gain on the Superior Hiking Trail – the kind of physical and mental challenge known well to Jo Swanson, trail development director for the Superior Hiking Trail Association and the keynote speaker for the fall workshop.</p>
<p>“One of my themes is empowerment – learning to overcome fears of adventuring in the outdoors,” Swanson said. “We live in a culture of fear and people react strongly when women go on outdoors adventures, especially when they go alone. The truth is that with planning and preparation, the outdoors can be a very safe place.”</p>
<p>The fall workshop is Friday, Sept. 14, through Sunday, Sept. 16, in a new location this year at Wolf Ridge Environmental Learning Center near Finland, Minn. Attendees will hear from Swanson and Minnesota state park naturalists. Session topics include Ojibwe heritage, Voyageurs, archery, canoeing, and the animals, plants and geology of the North Woods.</p>
<p>Linda Bylander, coordinator of the Becoming an Outdoors Woman program, said that along with the new location, the workshop offers a new selection of classes this year.</p>
<p>“Women who attend the fall workshop gain a whole range of experiences in a supportive environment,” Bylander said. “We chose dates when the fall colors should provide a beautiful backdrop.</p>
<p>The workshop is designed for women ages 18 and up but girls ages 14 to 17 are welcome to attend with parents or guardians. Visit <a href="http://www.mndnr.gov/bow">mndnr.gov/bow</a> for more information and to register.</p>
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		<item>
		<title>Lake of the Woods fisheries management plan open house July 24</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/07/12/lake-of-the-woods-fisheries-management-plan-open-house-july-24/</link>
		<pubDate>Thu, 12 Jul 2018 15:35:36 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fish and Wildlife]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fisheries]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fishing]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=20989</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[A draft five-year plan that guides fisheries management activities for Lake of the Woods will be discussed at a public open house on Tuesday, July 24. The open house will be from 5 to 7 p.m. at the Lake of &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/07/12/lake-of-the-woods-fisheries-management-plan-open-house-july-24/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>A draft five-year plan that guides fisheries management activities for Lake of the Woods will be discussed at a public open house on Tuesday, July 24. The open house will be from 5 to 7 p.m. at the Lake of the Woods Ambulance garage, 111 First St. SW in Baudette. <span id="more-20989"></span></p>
<p>“This open house will let participants ask questions and submit comments. No presentation will be made so people can arrive at any time,” said Phil Talmage, Baudette area fisheries supervisor. “The open house also serves as an opportunity to meet new staff in the Baudette Area Fisheries Office.”</p>
<p>The plan outlines proposed 5-year fish population objectives and management actions for walleye, sauger, northern pike and lake sturgeon. The draft management plan was developed in partnership with the 14 member Lake of the Woods Fisheries Input Group comprised of a diverse group of stakeholders with an interest in the popular border lake.</p>
<p>A 30-day online public comment period ended July 11. Additional comments can be submitted in writing at the public open house and through Wednesday, Aug. 15. The updated Lake of the Woods Management Plan will be finalized early this fall.</p>
<p>More information about Lake of the Woods and the draft fisheries management plan can be found on the DNR website at <a href="http://www.mndnr.gov/lakeofthewoods">mndnr.gov/lakeofthewoods</a>.</p>
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		<item>
		<title>Youth can hunt deer with adult mentors during special hunts</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/07/09/youth-can-hunt-deer-with-adult-mentors-during-special-hunts-2/</link>
		<pubDate>Mon, 09 Jul 2018 15:20:23 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Deer]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Hunting]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Wildlife]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=20974</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[Youth can apply to hunt deer in select state parks and other refuge areas during 17 special deer hunts in October and November, according to the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.  “These special hunts give youth and parents or adult &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/07/09/youth-can-hunt-deer-with-adult-mentors-during-special-hunts-2/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Youth can apply to hunt deer in select state parks and other refuge areas during 17 special deer hunts in October and November, according to the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. <span id="more-20974"></span></p>
<p>“These special hunts give youth and parents or adult mentors a fantastic opportunity to hunt together,” said James Burnham, DNR hunter and angler recruitment, retention and reactivation coordinator. “They can be memorable and positive experiences for all involved.”</p>
<p>Youth can apply now through Friday, Aug. 17, to apply for the hunts. Of the 17 special hunts, 15 are firearms hunts for youth ages 12 to 15, and two are archery hunts for youth ages 12 to 17.</p>
<p>Participation in other deer hunting seasons remains an option for youth who take part in the special youth deer hunts, but any deer harvested count against the youth’s season bag limit. An adult parent, guardian or mentor must accompany the youth at all times while hunting, but only the youth may hunt. Both youth and mentor must attend a mandatory pre-hunt orientation.</p>
<p>Details about the hunts, how to apply and other youth hunting information can be found at <a href="http://www.mndnr.gov/discover">mndnr.gov/discover</a>.</p>
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		<item>
		<title>Reminder: Minnesota Twins and DNR offer free hats</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/07/09/reminder-minnesota-twins-and-dnr-offer-free-hats/</link>
		<pubDate>Mon, 09 Jul 2018 15:18:38 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fishing]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Hunting]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=20971</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[Anyone with a 2018 Minnesota fishing or hunting license can receive a free camouflage and blaze orange Twins logo cap thanks to a special ticket offer online at mndnr.gov/twins.   As part of the Minnesota DNR Days partnership with the Twins, &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/07/09/reminder-minnesota-twins-and-dnr-offer-free-hats/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Anyone with a 2018 Minnesota fishing or hunting license can receive a free camouflage and blaze orange Twins logo cap thanks to a special ticket offer online at <a href="http://links.govdelivery.com:80/track?type=click&amp;enid=ZWFzPTEmbWFpbGluZ2lkPTIwMTgwNzA5LjkyMjg5MzAxJm1lc3NhZ2VpZD1NREItUFJELUJVTC0yMDE4MDcwOS45MjI4OTMwMSZkYXRhYmFzZWlkPTEwMDEmc2VyaWFsPTE3NTI5MzYyJmVtYWlsaWQ9anVsaWUuZm9yc3RlckBzdGF0ZS5tbi51cyZ1c2VyaWQ9anVsaWUuZm9yc3RlckBzdGF0ZS5tbi51cyZmbD0mZXh0cmE9TXVsdGl2YXJpYXRlSWQ9JiYm&amp;&amp;&amp;101&amp;&amp;&amp;http://www.mndnr.gov/twins?utm_content=&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_name=&amp;utm_source=govdelivery&amp;utm_term=">mndnr.gov/twins</a>.  <span id="more-20971"></span><img class="alignleft size-medium wp-image-20972" src="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/-3-300x217." alt="" width="300" height="217" srcset="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/-3-300x217. 300w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/-3-75x54. 75w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/-3-768x556. 768w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/-3-600x434. 600w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/-3 1160w" sizes="(max-width: 300px) 100vw, 300px" /></p>
<p>As part of the Minnesota DNR Days partnership with the Twins, license holders can purchase a reserved game ticket online and receive a special Twins cap at these games:</p>
<ul>
<li>Sunday, July 15, Tampa Bay Rays, 1:10 p.m.</li>
<li>Saturday, Aug. 25, Oakland Athletics, 6:10 p.m.</li>
<li>Saturday, Sept. 8, Kansas City Royals, 6:10 p.m.</li>
</ul>
<p>Ticket prices vary by game and seat locations are either in the Field Box or Home Run Porch sections. All ticket holders under this partnership will pick up their cap at the game. Instructions for purchasing tickets are at <a href="http://links.govdelivery.com:80/track?type=click&amp;enid=ZWFzPTEmbWFpbGluZ2lkPTIwMTgwNzA5LjkyMjg5MzAxJm1lc3NhZ2VpZD1NREItUFJELUJVTC0yMDE4MDcwOS45MjI4OTMwMSZkYXRhYmFzZWlkPTEwMDEmc2VyaWFsPTE3NTI5MzYyJmVtYWlsaWQ9anVsaWUuZm9yc3RlckBzdGF0ZS5tbi51cyZ1c2VyaWQ9anVsaWUuZm9yc3RlckBzdGF0ZS5tbi51cyZmbD0mZXh0cmE9TXVsdGl2YXJpYXRlSWQ9JiYm&amp;&amp;&amp;102&amp;&amp;&amp;http://www.mndnr.gov/twins?utm_content=&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_name=&amp;utm_source=govdelivery&amp;utm_term=">mndnr.gov/twins</a>.</p>
<p>Buy fishing and hunting licenses at any DNR license agent, online with a mobile or desktop device at <a href="http://links.govdelivery.com:80/track?type=click&amp;enid=ZWFzPTEmbWFpbGluZ2lkPTIwMTgwNzA5LjkyMjg5MzAxJm1lc3NhZ2VpZD1NREItUFJELUJVTC0yMDE4MDcwOS45MjI4OTMwMSZkYXRhYmFzZWlkPTEwMDEmc2VyaWFsPTE3NTI5MzYyJmVtYWlsaWQ9anVsaWUuZm9yc3RlckBzdGF0ZS5tbi51cyZ1c2VyaWQ9anVsaWUuZm9yc3RlckBzdGF0ZS5tbi51cyZmbD0mZXh0cmE9TXVsdGl2YXJpYXRlSWQ9JiYm&amp;&amp;&amp;103&amp;&amp;&amp;http://www.mndnr.gov/buyalicense?utm_content=&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_name=&amp;utm_source=govdelivery&amp;utm_term=">mndnr.gov/buyalicense</a>, or by phone at 888-665-4236. Mobile buyers receive a text or email that serves as proof of a valid fish or game license to state conservation officers.</p>
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		<title>DNR and city seek public input on Gitchi-Gami Trail development</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/07/05/dnr-and-city-seek-public-input-on-gitchi-gami-trail-development/</link>
		<pubDate>Thu, 05 Jul 2018 16:46:27 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[State Parks]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Trails]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=20963</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources Parks and Trails Division will host an open house from 5 to 6:30 p.m. Thursday, July 12, at the Grand Marais City Hall Council Chambers to discuss and get feedback on the Grand Marais-to-Cutface &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/07/05/dnr-and-city-seek-public-input-on-gitchi-gami-trail-development/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources Parks and Trails Division will host an open house from 5 to 6:30 p.m. Thursday, July 12, at the Grand Marais City Hall Council Chambers to discuss and get feedback on the Grand Marais-to-Cutface segment of the Gitchi-Gami State Trail. <span id="more-20963"></span></p>
<p>The most recent trail plan and trail layout will be available for public review at City Hall, 15 N. Broadway, Grand Marais.</p>
<p>The new segment of the trail will be just over 3 miles long. It will start at Fall River Road in Grand Marais and go south along Lake Superior to Cutface Creek, where there’s a rest area on Hwy. 61.  Proposed amenities will include observation areas and interpretive signage. Construction is scheduled to begin in the fall of 2019, with completion anticipated by summer 2020.</p>
<p>When it’s complete, the Gitchi-Gami State Trail will extend for 86 miles from Two Harbors to Grand Marais. More than 28 miles of the trail have already been paved. The longest paved segment is the 15-mile segment from Gooseberry Falls to Beaver Bay.</p>
<p>There will be no formal presentation at the open house. Visitors can stop by anytime during the 90-minute session to ask questions and provide informal feedback to city and DNR staff.</p>
<p>For more information about the Gitchi-Gami State Trail, visit<a href="https://www.dnr.state.mn.us/state_trails/gitchigami/index.html?utm_content=&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_name=&amp;utm_source=govdelivery&amp;utm_term="> mndnr.gov/state_trails/gitchigami</a> or contact the DNR Information Center by emailing <a href="mailto:info.dnr@state.mn.us">info.dnr@state.mn.us</a> or by calling 888-646-6367 (8 a.m.-8 p.m. Monday through Friday, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturday).</p>
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		<title>Zebra mussels confirmed in Jewett Lake in Otter Tail County, Floyd Lake in Becker County</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/07/02/zebra-mussels-confirmed-in-jewett-lake-in-otter-tail-county-floyd-lake-in-becker-county/</link>
		<pubDate>Mon, 02 Jul 2018 16:59:10 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Aquatic Invasive Species]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fishing]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=20960</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[Zebra mussels have been confirmed in Jewett Lake in Otter Tail County and Floyd Lake in adjacent Becker County, according to the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. Watershed district staff alerted the DNR to the discovery of an adult zebra &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/07/02/zebra-mussels-confirmed-in-jewett-lake-in-otter-tail-county-floyd-lake-in-becker-county/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Zebra mussels have been confirmed in Jewett Lake in Otter Tail County and Floyd Lake in adjacent Becker County, according to the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.<span id="more-20960"></span></p>
<p>Watershed district staff alerted the DNR to the discovery of an adult zebra mussel attached to a native clam in Floyd Lake. DNR invasive species specialists found several adult zebra mussels in three areas of the lake.</p>
<p>Swimmers reported finding two adult zebra mussels on Jewett Lake. DNR invasive species specialists found several adult zebra mussels in three areas of the lake.</p>
<p>“It’s helpful when people recreating or working on a lake contact the DNR when they find a suspected invasive species,” DNR assistant invasive species specialist Mark Ranweiler said.</p>
<p>Whether or not a lake is listed as infested, Minnesota law requires boaters and anglers to:</p>
<ul>
<li><strong>Clean</strong> watercraft and trailers of aquatic plants and prohibited invasive species.</li>
<li><strong>Drain</strong> all water by removing drain plugs and keeping them out during transport.</li>
<li><strong>Dispose</strong> of unwanted bait in the trash.</li>
</ul>
<p>Some invasive species are small and difficult to see at the access. To remove or kill them, take one or more of the following precautions before moving to another waterbody:</p>
<ul>
<li>Spray with high-pressure water.</li>
<li>Rinse with very hot water (120 degrees Fahrenheit for at least two minutes or 140 degrees for at least 10 seconds).</li>
<li>Dry for at least five days.</li>
</ul>
<p>Zebra mussels can compete with native species for food and habitat, cut the feet of swimmers, reduce the performance of boat motors, and cause expensive damage to water intake pipes.</p>
<p>People should <a href="http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/invasives/ais/contacts.html?utm_content=&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_name=&amp;utm_source=govdelivery&amp;utm_term=">contact an area DNR aquatic invasive species specialist</a> if they think they have found zebra mussels or any other invasive species.</p>
<p>More information is available at <a href="http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/invasives/aquatic/index.html">mndnr.gov/ais</a>.</p>
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		<title>Applications open for prairie chicken hunt lottery</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/07/02/applications-open-for-prairie-chicken-hunt-lottery-3/</link>
		<pubDate>Mon, 02 Jul 2018 15:14:52 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Hunting]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=20956</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[Hunters can apply through Friday, Aug. 17, to be chosen for one of 125 permits for the 2018 Minnesota prairie chicken hunting season, according to the Department of Natural Resources.  The nine-day prairie chicken season begins Saturday, Sept. 29, and &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/07/02/applications-open-for-prairie-chicken-hunt-lottery-3/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Hunters can apply through Friday, Aug. 17, to be chosen for one of 125 permits for the 2018 Minnesota prairie chicken hunting season, according to the Department of Natural Resources. <span id="more-20956"></span></p>
<p>The nine-day prairie chicken season begins Saturday, Sept. 29, and is open only to Minnesota residents.</p>
<p>“Prairie chicken numbers are influenced by the amount of grassland habitat within the range and provide a limited, but unique, hunting opportunity in northwestern Minnesota,” said Leslie McInenly, DNR acting wildlife populations program manager.</p>
<p>Hunters will be charged a $4 application fee and may apply individually or in groups up to four. Prairie chicken licenses cost $23. Apply at any DNR license agent; the DNR License Center, 500 Lafayette Road, St. Paul; online at <a href="http://links.govdelivery.com:80/track?type=click&amp;enid=ZWFzPTEmbWFpbGluZ2lkPTIwMTgwNzAyLjkxOTYwMTIxJm1lc3NhZ2VpZD1NREItUFJELUJVTC0yMDE4MDcwMi45MTk2MDEyMSZkYXRhYmFzZWlkPTEwMDEmc2VyaWFsPTE3NTI3OTMxJmVtYWlsaWQ9anVsaWUuZm9yc3RlckBzdGF0ZS5tbi51cyZ1c2VyaWQ9anVsaWUuZm9yc3RlckBzdGF0ZS5tbi51cyZmbD0mZXh0cmE9TXVsdGl2YXJpYXRlSWQ9JiYm&amp;&amp;&amp;101&amp;&amp;&amp;http://www.mndnr.gov/buyalicense?utm_content=&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_name=&amp;utm_source=govdelivery&amp;utm_term=">mndnr.gov/buyalicense</a> or by telephone at 888-665-4236. An additional fee is charged for orders placed online or by phone.</p>
<p>The hunt takes place in 11 prairie chicken quota areas in west-central Minnesota between St. Hilaire in the north and Breckenridge in the south. Up to 20 percent of the permits in each area will be issued to landowners or tenants of 40 acres or more of prairie or grassland property within the permit area for which they applied. The season bag limit is two prairie chickens per hunter. Based on hunter surveys, the DNR estimates that 97 hunters harvested 86 prairie chickens during the 2017 hunt. Results of spring booming ground surveys will be available later this summer.</p>
<p>Licensed prairie chicken hunters will be allowed to take sharp-tailed grouse while legally hunting prairie chickens, but prairie chicken hunters who want to take sharptails must meet all regulations and licensing requirements for taking sharp-tailed grouse. Sharptails and prairie chickens look similar and sharp-tailed grouse hunting is normally closed in this area of the state to protect prairie chickens that might be taken accidentally.</p>
<p>Applications are available wherever Minnesota hunting and fishing licenses are sold and application procedures and a permit area map are available at <a href="http://links.govdelivery.com:80/track?type=click&amp;enid=ZWFzPTEmbWFpbGluZ2lkPTIwMTgwNzAyLjkxOTYwMTIxJm1lc3NhZ2VpZD1NREItUFJELUJVTC0yMDE4MDcwMi45MTk2MDEyMSZkYXRhYmFzZWlkPTEwMDEmc2VyaWFsPTE3NTI3OTMxJmVtYWlsaWQ9anVsaWUuZm9yc3RlckBzdGF0ZS5tbi51cyZ1c2VyaWQ9anVsaWUuZm9yc3RlckBzdGF0ZS5tbi51cyZmbD0mZXh0cmE9TXVsdGl2YXJpYXRlSWQ9JiYm&amp;&amp;&amp;102&amp;&amp;&amp;http://www.mndnr.gov/hunting/prairiechicken?utm_content=&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_name=&amp;utm_source=govdelivery&amp;utm_term=">mndnr.gov/hunting/prairiechicken</a>.</p>
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		<title>Ruffed grouse counts down, sharp-tailed grouse down too</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/07/02/ruffed-grouse-counts-down-sharp-tailed-grouse-down-too/</link>
		<pubDate>Mon, 02 Jul 2018 15:03:36 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fish and Wildlife]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Hunting]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Ruffed Grouse]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Wildlife]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=20952</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[Minnesota’s ruffed grouse spring drumming counts were down 29 percent statewide this year compared to last year, according to a survey conducted by the Department of Natural Resources.  “Surveys indicate the peak occurred last year,” said Charlotte Roy, DNR grouse &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/07/02/ruffed-grouse-counts-down-sharp-tailed-grouse-down-too/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Minnesota’s ruffed grouse spring drumming counts were down 29 percent statewide this year compared to last year, according to a survey conducted by the Department of Natural Resources. <span id="more-20952"></span></p>
<p><img class="alignleft size-medium wp-image-20954" src="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/-2-300x258." alt="" width="300" height="258" srcset="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/-2-300x258. 300w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/-2-75x65. 75w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/-2 575w" sizes="(max-width: 300px) 100vw, 300px" />“Surveys indicate the peak occurred last year,” said Charlotte Roy, DNR grouse project leader. “Grouse populations tend to rise and fall on a decade-long cycle and counts this year are pointing to the peak lasting only one year this cycle. This has occurred before, but it’s always nice when the cycle stays high a little longer.”</p>
<p>Drumming is a low sound produced by males as they beat their wings rapidly and in increasing frequency to signal the location of their territory. Drumming displays also attract females that are ready to begin nesting. Ruffed grouse populations are surveyed by counting the number of male ruffed grouse heard drumming on established routes throughout the state’s forested regions.</p>
<p>Drumming counts are an indicator of the ruffed grouse breeding population. The number of birds present during the fall hunting season also depends upon nesting success and chick survival during the spring and summer.</p>
<p>“If production of young birds is low during the summer months, hunters may see fewer birds than expected based on counts of drumming males in the spring,” Roy said. “Conversely, when production of young is high, hunters may see more birds in the fall.”</p>
<p>For the past 69 years, DNR biologists have monitored ruffed grouse populations. This year, DNR staff and cooperators from 16 organizations surveyed 122 routes across the state.</p>
<p>The 2018 survey results for ruffed grouse were 1.5 drums per stop statewide. The averages during 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016 and 2017 were 0.9, 1.1, 1.1, 1.3 and 2.1 respectively. Counts vary from about 0.6 drums per stop during years of low grouse abundance to about 2.0 during years of high abundance.</p>
<p>Results this year follow an increase from 2016 to 2017. In the northeast survey region, which is the core of Minnesota’s grouse range, counts were 1.7 drums per stop; in the northwest there were 1.0 drums per stop; in the central hardwoods, 0.9 drums per stop; and in the southeast, 0.9 drums per stop.</p>
<p><strong>Sharp-tailed grouse counts down</strong></p>
<p>To count sharp-tailed grouse, observers look for males displaying on traditional mating areas, which are called leks or dancing grounds.</p>
<p>Comparisons of the same leks counted in both years indicate that counts per lek were down compared to last year in the northwest and statewide. Declines in the east-central region were not significant, likely because fewer leks were counted compared to last year, and loss of small leks does not reduce the index.</p>
<p>This year’s statewide average of 9.3 sharp-tailed grouse per lek was similar to the long-term average since 1980. The 2009 average of 13.6 was as high as during any year since 1980. During the last 25 years, the sharp-tailed grouse index has been as low as seven birds counted per dancing ground.</p>
<p>The DNR’s 2018 grouse survey report and grouse hunting information can be found at <a href="http://links.govdelivery.com:80/track?type=click&amp;enid=ZWFzPTEmbWFpbGluZ2lkPTIwMTgwNzAyLjkxOTYwMTIxJm1lc3NhZ2VpZD1NREItUFJELUJVTC0yMDE4MDcwMi45MTk2MDEyMSZkYXRhYmFzZWlkPTEwMDEmc2VyaWFsPTE3NTI3OTMxJmVtYWlsaWQ9anVsaWUuZm9yc3RlckBzdGF0ZS5tbi51cyZ1c2VyaWQ9anVsaWUuZm9yc3RlckBzdGF0ZS5tbi51cyZmbD0mZXh0cmE9TXVsdGl2YXJpYXRlSWQ9JiYm&amp;&amp;&amp;100&amp;&amp;&amp;http://www.mndnr.gov/hunting/grouse?utm_content=&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_name=&amp;utm_source=govdelivery&amp;utm_term=">mndnr.gov/hunting/grouse</a>.</p>
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		<title>DNR urges caution on swollen lakes and rivers</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/06/28/dnr-urges-caution-on-swollen-lakes-and-rivers/</link>
		<pubDate>Thu, 28 Jun 2018 19:43:49 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fish and Wildlife]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fisheries]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fishing]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Water Safety]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=20946</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[Anglers, boaters and anyone who recreates on or near areas where recent rainfall has raised water levels should exercise extreme caution – or stay away altogether until the water recedes, according to the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. Lakes and &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/06/28/dnr-urges-caution-on-swollen-lakes-and-rivers/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Anglers, boaters and anyone who recreates on or near areas where recent rainfall has raised water levels should exercise extreme caution – or stay away altogether until the water recedes, according to the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. Lakes and rivers in several counties throughout the state currently have no-wake restrictions due to high water, and conservation officers recommend boaters stay off flooded portions of the Minnesota River and its tributaries.<span id="more-20946"></span></p>
<p><img class="alignleft size-medium wp-image-20948" src="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/-17-225x300." alt="" width="225" height="300" srcset="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/-17-225x300. 225w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/-17-56x75. 56w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/-17-450x600. 450w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/-17 480w" sizes="(max-width: 225px) 100vw, 225px" />As of earlier this week, for example, docks were underwater on many lakes in the St. Peter area, parks and boat landings along the Minnesota River were underwater, and no-wake regulations were in effect on portions of the St. Croix River. In addition to inundating river banks, the recent rainfall has downed trees and swept natural and man-made objects into the water, creating hazards for boaters, swimmers and others. High water also can cover obstructions such as concrete pilings that boaters might not see until it’s too late.</p>
<p>“The amount of water flowing through many river systems right now means the current is fast, strong and unpredictable, which can be problematic even for experienced paddler and swimmers,” said Lisa Dugan, DNR recreation safety outreach coordinator. “People should avoid places where there’s a high-water alert and keep in mind that wearing a life jacket provides the best chance of surviving a fall into dangerous water.”</p>
<p>In addition, people should tell someone where they will be and when they plan to return.</p>
<p>Updated river level reports for Minnesota are at <a href="http://mndnr.gov/river_levels?utm_content=&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_name=&amp;utm_source=govdelivery&amp;utm_term=">mndnr.gov/river_levels</a>. However, people should be aware that conditions can change quickly. For more information on the state’s 35 water trails, see <a href="http://mndnr.gov/watertrails?utm_content=&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_name=&amp;utm_source=govdelivery&amp;utm_term=">mndnr.gov/watertrails</a>.</p>
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		<title>Boaters and anglers must take steps to prevent aquatic invasive species spread</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/06/28/boaters-and-anglers-must-take-steps-to-prevent-aquatic-invasive-species-spread/</link>
		<pubDate>Thu, 28 Jun 2018 19:42:34 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Aquatic Invasive Species]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fish and Wildlife]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fisheries]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fishing]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=20944</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[The upcoming Independence Day holiday brings busier lake accesses, and people will be hurrying to family gatherings and celebrations. It is important for all lake and river users to take a few minutes to clean, drain, dispose—every time.  “Nearly all &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/06/28/boaters-and-anglers-must-take-steps-to-prevent-aquatic-invasive-species-spread/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>The upcoming Independence Day holiday brings busier lake accesses, and people will be hurrying to family gatherings and celebrations. It is important for all lake and river users to take a few minutes to clean, drain, dispose—every time. <span id="more-20944"></span></p>
<p>“Nearly all boaters and anglers understand and follow Minnesota’s clean, drain, dispose laws to prevent spreading aquatic invasive species,” said Heidi Wolf, Minnesota Department of Natural Resources invasive species unit supervisor. “People can prevent the spread of invasive species like zebra mussels, starry stonewort and Eurasian watermilfoil by always cleaning and draining watercraft and disposing of bait in the trash.”</p>
<p>Minnesota law requires boaters and anglers to take these steps every time they leave a lake or river:</p>
<ul>
<li><strong>Clean</strong> watercraft and trailers of aquatic plants and prohibited invasive species.</li>
<li><strong>Drain</strong> all water by removing drain plugs and keeping them out during transport.</li>
<li><strong>Dispose</strong> of unwanted bait in the trash.</li>
</ul>
<p>Some invasive species are small and difficult to see at the access. To remove or kill them, take one or more of the following precautions before moving to another waterbody:</p>
<ul>
<li>Spray with high-pressure water.</li>
<li>Rinse with very hot water (120 degrees Fahrenheit for at least two minutes or 140 degrees for at least 10 seconds).</li>
<li>Dry for at least five days.</li>
</ul>
<p>People should <a href="http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/invasives/ais/contacts.html?utm_content=&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_name=&amp;utm_source=govdelivery&amp;utm_term=">contact an area DNR aquatic invasive species specialist</a> if they think they have found an invasive species.</p>
<p>More information is available at <a href="http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/invasives/aquatic/index.html?utm_content=&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_name=&amp;utm_source=govdelivery&amp;utm_term=">mndnr.gov/ais</a>.</p>
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		<title>DNR names 2017 ATV safety instructor of the year</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/06/28/dnr-names-2017-atv-safety-instructor-of-the-year/</link>
		<pubDate>Thu, 28 Jun 2018 19:41:13 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[OHV]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Trails]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=20942</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources has named Gale Bradford, of Wright in Carlton County, as its 2017 ATV safety instructor of the year. Bradford, who is the lead ATV safety coordinator for the Evergreen PAC ATV club, has been &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/06/28/dnr-names-2017-atv-safety-instructor-of-the-year/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources has named Gale Bradford, of Wright in Carlton County, as its 2017 ATV safety instructor of the year. Bradford, who is the lead ATV safety coordinator for the Evergreen PAC ATV club, has been involved with the club for 11 years and been an ATV safety instructor for more than seven. <span id="more-20942"></span></p>
<p><img class="alignleft size-medium wp-image-20950" src="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/-18-300x180." alt="" width="300" height="180" srcset="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/-18-300x180. 300w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/-18-75x45. 75w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/-18-768x462. 768w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/-18-600x361. 600w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/-18 1056w" sizes="(max-width: 300px) 100vw, 300px" />Bradford stepped into the role after her mentor, Rita Butterfield (the 2009 ATV safety instructor of the year), passed away unexpectedly. Bradford has a passion for youth ATV training and is committed to continuing the work of her mentor.</p>
<p>“Gale’s dedication to ATV safety is impressive,” said Conservation Officer Amber Ladd, who patrols the McGregor area and nominated Bradford for the award. “She goes above and beyond to make sure youth riders who want to take safety training have the opportunity to do so.”</p>
<p>Last summer, for example, Bradford’s club had one class that grew unexpectedly large. Rather than turn away students, she organized more volunteers and set up two sets of courses. Bradford’s club last summer certified more than 100 students, which is more than it ever had. The club offers courses in Aitkin and Carlton counties.</p>
<p>DNR conservation officers work closely with the nearly 1,000 volunteer ATV safety instructors throughout the state who deliver ATV safety training certification. For details on safety courses and training, see <a href="http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/safety/vehicle/atv/index.html?utm_content=&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_name=&amp;utm_source=govdelivery&amp;utm_term=">mndnr.gov/safety/vehicle/atv/index.html</a>. For more information on ATV regulations in the state, see <a href="https://www.dnr.state.mn.us/regulations/ohv/index.html?utm_content=&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_name=&amp;utm_source=govdelivery&amp;utm_term=">mndnr.gov/regulations/ohv/index.html</a></p>
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		<title>Brad Parsons named state fisheries chief</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/06/26/brad-parsons-named-state-fisheries-chief/</link>
		<pubDate>Tue, 26 Jun 2018 16:22:18 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fish and Wildlife]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fisheries]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fishing]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Mille Lacs]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=20938</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[Brad Parsons, a 31-year fisheries veteran and current central region fisheries manager for the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, has been selected as the new fisheries chief for the DNR. His new duties begin Wednesday, July 25.  “Brad brings a &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/06/26/brad-parsons-named-state-fisheries-chief/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Brad Parsons, a 31-year fisheries veteran and current central region fisheries manager for the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, has been selected as the new fisheries chief for the DNR. His new duties begin Wednesday, July 25. <span id="more-20938"></span></p>
<img class="size-medium wp-image-20939" src="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/-16-214x300." alt="" width="214" height="300" srcset="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/-16-214x300. 214w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/-16-54x75. 54w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/-16-429x600. 429w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/-16 700w" sizes="(max-width: 214px) 100vw, 214px" />
<p>“Brad brings a breadth of valuable experience to this important job,” said DNR Commissioner Tom Landwehr. “His years working his way up as a researcher in the field and then serving as regional fisheries manager will help us manage the state’s fisheries in ways that positively serve citizens, natural resources and local economies.”</p>
<p>Parsons, a St. Paul Park resident, has been the DNR’s central region fisheries manager since 2010. In addition to managing the region’s eight fisheries offices, he has played a key role in management issues on Lake Mille Lacs, and the St. Croix and Mississippi rivers. He also is the agency’s point person with the citizen-based Walleye Workgroup.</p>
<p>Parsons began his career at the DNR researching a range of topics including walleye populations, angler harvest and attitudes, wetland ecology and predator-prey interactions. As fisheries manager for the central region he was responsible for an area including Minnesota’s lake country, two major rivers, three major metropolitan areas and trout streams in the southeastern part of the state.</p>
<p>Parsons will oversee a $34 million annual fisheries section budget and a staff of 286 full-time and part-time employees. With personnel based in four regional offices, 29 area offices and 15 hatcheries, the fisheries section carries out research and management programs affecting state fish species and habitat.</p>
<p>Fishing is big business in Minnesota. Direct angler expenditures in Minnesota total $2.4 billion and support 35,000 jobs, according to a 2011 U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service survey. About 28 percent of Minnesotans go fishing, double the national average.</p>
<p>Parsons is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point and has an advanced degree in fisheries from the University of Wyoming. He is the author or co-author of numerous peer-reviewed publications and technical reports. He replaces Don Pereira, who retired on June 8.</p>
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		<title>DNR upgrades outdoor recreation maps for mobile devices</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/06/25/dnr-upgrades-outdoor-recreation-maps-for-mobile-devices/</link>
		<pubDate>Mon, 25 Jun 2018 19:42:10 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[State Parks]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Trails]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=20929</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[Navigating Minnesota’s woods and waters with a mobile device is now easier than ever with new digital maps available from the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. Cartographers in the Parks and Trails Division have recently upgraded nearly all of the &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/06/25/dnr-upgrades-outdoor-recreation-maps-for-mobile-devices/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Navigating Minnesota’s woods and waters with a mobile device is now easier than ever with new digital maps available from the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.<span id="more-20929"></span></p>
<p><img class="alignleft size-medium wp-image-20931" src="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/-13-225x300." alt="" width="225" height="300" srcset="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/-13-225x300. 225w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/-13-56x75. 56w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/-13-450x600. 450w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/-13 720w" sizes="(max-width: 225px) 100vw, 225px" />Cartographers in the Parks and Trails Division have recently upgraded nearly all of the maps for Minnesota state parks, state water trails, off-highway vehicle (OHV) trails and public water access sites to geospatial (location-referenced) PDF files (or GeoPDFs for short). State trail and snowmobile trail maps will be available in about a month.</p>
<p>“Our new GeoPDF maps are part of our ongoing efforts to improve the visitor experience,” said Erika Rivers, director of the DNR’s Parks and Trails Division. “Knowing exactly where you are at any given time takes away the worry about getting lost, so you can focus instead on having fun outdoors.”</p>
<p>The GeoPDF maps are best read with Avenza Maps, a GeoPDF reader app, which is available for free from the Google Play Store (for Android devices) or the App Store (for iPhones). Internet access is needed to install the app and map files, but once they are installed, they do not need Internet access or cell phone service to function.</p>
<p>“The app relies solely on a device’s built-in GPS receiver to track your movement,” Rivers said. “Your location is represented on the map by a small blue dot, which moves as you move.”</p>
<p>Instructions on how to download the application and map can be found on the <a href="https://www.dnr.state.mn.us/mobile/geopdf/index.html">DNR website</a>.</p>
<p>For more information, visit the <a href="https://www.dnr.state.mn.us/mobile/geopdf/index.html">DNR website</a> or contact the DNR Information Center by emailing <a href="mailto:info.dnr@state.mn.us">info.dnr@state.mn.us</a> or by calling 888-646-6367 (8 a.m.-8 p.m. Monday through Friday, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturday).</p>
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		<title>Breeding duck and Canada goose numbers improved from last year</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/06/25/breeding-duck-and-canada-goose-numbers-improved-from-last-year/</link>
		<pubDate>Mon, 25 Jun 2018 19:34:38 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Waterfowl]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Wildlife]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=20927</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[Population counts showed good results for several species of ducks that nest in Minnesota, according to the results of the annual Department of Natural Resources spring waterfowl surveys.  “Mallard, blue-winged teal and Canada goose counts were all improved from last &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/06/25/breeding-duck-and-canada-goose-numbers-improved-from-last-year/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Population counts showed good results for several species of ducks that nest in Minnesota, according to the results of the annual Department of Natural Resources spring waterfowl surveys. <span id="more-20927"></span></p>
<p><img class="alignleft size-medium wp-image-20933" src="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/-14-300x217." alt="" width="300" height="217" srcset="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/-14-300x217. 300w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/-14-75x54. 75w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/-14-768x554. 768w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/-14-600x433. 600w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/-14 960w" sizes="(max-width: 300px) 100vw, 300px" />“Mallard, blue-winged teal and Canada goose counts were all improved from last year,” said Steve Cordts, DNR waterfowl specialist. “The survey is designed for mallards and our breeding mallard population remains above its long-term average.”</p>
<p>This year’s mallard breeding population was estimated at 295,000, which is 38 percent above last year’s estimate of 214,000 breeding mallards and 30 percent above the long-term average measured each year since 1968.</p>
<p>The blue-winged teal population is 191,000 this year, 20 percent above last year’s estimate and 10 percent below the long-term average.</p>
<p>The combined populations of other ducks such as ring-necked ducks, wood ducks, gadwalls, northern shovelers, canvasbacks and redheads is 207,000, which is 21 percent lower than last year and 15 percent above the long-term average.</p>
<p>The estimate of total breeding duck abundance (excluding scaup) is 693,000, which is 9 percent higher than last year and 12 percent above the long-term average.</p>
<p>The estimated number of wetlands was 1 percent lower than last year and 4 percent above the long-term average. Wetland numbers can vary greatly based on annual precipitation.</p>
<p>The survey is used to estimate the number of breeding ducks or breeding geese that nest in the state rather than simply migrate through. In addition to the counts by the DNR, the continental waterfowl population estimates will be released by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service later this summer.</p>
<p><strong>DNR survey methods</strong><br />
The same waterfowl survey has been done each year since 1968 to provide an annual index of breeding duck abundance. The survey covers 40 percent of Minnesota and includes much of the state’s best remaining duck breeding habitat.</p>
<p>A DNR waterfowl biologist and pilot count all waterfowl and wetlands along established survey routes by flying low-level aerial surveys from a fixed-wing plane. The survey is timed to begin in early May to coincide with peak nesting activity of mallards. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service provides ground crews who also count waterfowl along some of the same survey routes. These data are then used to correct for birds not seen by the aerial crew.</p>
<p><strong>Canada geese</strong><br />
This year’s Canada goose population was estimated at 162,000 geese, similar to last year’s estimate of 152,000 geese and 2 percent above the long-term average.</p>
<p>“We had very unusual weather conditions this spring, with the mid-April blizzard and record late ice-outs. April temperatures were the third coldest on record and May temperatures were the fourth warmest on record,” Cordts said. “This likely impacted geese more than ducks, with an extremely late, and probably reduced, goose hatch.”</p>
<p>The 2018 Minnesota waterfowl report is available at <a href="http://www.mndnr.gov/hunting/waterfowl">mndnr.gov/hunting/waterfowl</a>.</p>
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		<title>Wildlife Drive opening at Roseau River Wildlife Management Area</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/06/25/wildlife-drive-opening-at-roseau-river-wildlife-management-area-3/</link>
		<pubDate>Mon, 25 Jun 2018 19:32:57 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fish and Wildlife]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fishing]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Wildlife]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=20925</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[The 27-mile Wildlife Drive through the Roseau River Wildlife Management Area, located 20 miles northwest of Roseau, will be open to vehicular travel Saturday, July 14, through Sunday, July 22, and weekends thereafter through Sunday, Aug. 12. The drive traverses &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/06/25/wildlife-drive-opening-at-roseau-river-wildlife-management-area-3/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>The 27-mile Wildlife Drive through the Roseau River Wildlife Management Area, located 20 miles northwest of Roseau, will be open to vehicular travel Saturday, July 14, through Sunday, July 22, and weekends thereafter through Sunday, Aug. 12. The drive traverses wetland, woodland, brushland and farmland habitats, providing visitors ample opportunity to view wildlife.<span id="more-20925"></span></p>
<p>The Roseau River WMA is one of the viewing stops along the Pine to Prairie Birding Trail, which consists of 45 sites spanning a 223-mile corridor from pine to prairie in the northwestern part of the state. These sites offer some of the most spectacular birding in the state, along with scenic beauty and friendly communities.</p>
<p>About 149 bird species breed within the Roseau River WMA. Yellow rails and horned grebes are a few of the rare breeding species found within the area’s vast wetlands. Along the drive, visitors also may encounter trumpeter swans, loons, white pelicans, sandhill cranes, great blue herons, eagles, a variety of ducks and other water birds, sedge wrens, yellow warblers, Nelson’s sharp-tailed sparrows, black bears, deer, beaver, otter, mink, red fox, gray wolf and the occasional moose.</p>
<p>Aside from excellent wildlife viewing, the WMA “pools” offer spectacular year-round opportunities to fish for northern pike. Visitors typically fish along the dike roads or near the water control structures. When the dike roads are closed to motorists, visitors can bike to Pool 1 West or Pool 2 from the parking areas. During the waterfowl hunting season only, motorboats of 10 horsepower or less may be used on the Roseau River WMA.</p>
<p>The Wildlife Drive can be easily accessed at the main dike road, located 1-3/4 miles south of the WMA headquarters on Roseau County Road 3. Only motor vehicles licensed for use on public highways are legally permitted to operate on this road. Motorists are urged to use caution due to narrow roads, soft shoulders, deep ditches and two-way traffic. The speed limit on all WMA roads is 20 mph. The wildlife drive may be closed due to inclement weather or road construction.</p>
<p>For more information, contact or stop by the Roseau River WMA office to pick up a bird list, maps, fishing regulations and additional information at 27952 400th St., Roseau, MN 56751; call 218-463-1130; or visit <a href="http://www.mndnr.gov/wmas">mndnr.gov/wmas</a></p>
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		<title>Bears and birdfeeders – a recipe for conflict</title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/06/25/bears-and-birdfeeders-a-recipe-for-conflict/</link>
		<pubDate>Mon, 25 Jun 2018 19:31:34 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Bear]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Hunting]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Wildlife]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=20922</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[Many homeowners enjoy feeding birds but in bear country the practice often comes with unintended consequences, according to the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. Wildlife managers and conservation officers know that the majority of bear-related calls involve bears destroying birdfeeders &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/06/25/bears-and-birdfeeders-a-recipe-for-conflict/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Many homeowners enjoy feeding birds but in bear country the practice often comes with unintended consequences, according to the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.<span id="more-20922"></span></p>
<p><img class="alignleft size-medium wp-image-20923" src="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/-12-300x240." alt="" width="300" height="240" srcset="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/-12-300x240. 300w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/-12-75x60. 75w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/-12-600x480. 600w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/-12 700w" sizes="(max-width: 300px) 100vw, 300px" />Wildlife managers and conservation officers know that the majority of bear-related calls involve bears destroying birdfeeders after homeowners underestimate how attractive bears find birdfeeders as a food source.</p>
<p>“Bears use a feeding strategy called ‘high-grading’ where they seek out rich patches of concentrated food, and skip over places with low food density,” said Dave Garshelis, DNR bear research project leader. “They also have excellent memories about where they’ve found good sources of food,” “A birdfeeder is a bountiful source of high-calorie food.”</p>
<p><strong>All about the calories</strong></p>
<p>A well-stocked birdfeeder could supply more than 10,000 calories in one place with little effort. Compared to the energy it would take to obtain the same number of calories from scattered patches of wild berries, nuts or insects, bears find it much more efficient to feed at a birdfeeder, especially if the food there is continually replenished.</p>
<p>In late summer, bears transition into a state of rapid weight gain that prepares them for six months of hibernation. During this time bears’ caloric needs increase and they can gain three to five pounds of body fat every day, a feeding pattern they continue until shrinking day length and disappearing foods signals them to begin hibernating.</p>
<p>“If a bear found an easy meal at your birdfeeder or trash can, chances are it will remember how to find your yard again. And you can plan on that bear and possibly others coming back,” Garshelis said.</p>
<p><strong>One bear could mean several bears</strong></p>
<p>Bears have an innate preference for wild foods, but if frequently rewarded with highly-concentrated human foods, they may grow to prefer that, and then seek out such foods. Mothers then pass this feeding behavior on to their offspring. In a controlled feeding trial, researchers observed that most bears chose black oil sunflower seeds above acorns once they had the chance to try them.</p>
<p>Bears so conditioned sometimes become very bold. Some have been known to open unlocked car doors, enter open windows and patio doors of homes, push through screen doors, enter livestock pens, raid gardens and stir compost piles – anywhere food is left unattended and unsecured. Such bears become hard to scare away, because they are not only intent on getting the human-related foods, they have experienced no negative consequences from being near people. When behavior escalates to this point, people often become fearful of bears and perceive them as a safety threat.</p>
<p>The DNR does not trap and relocate bears because it is nearly impossible to find a release site in Minnesota where a food-conditioned, traveling bear wouldn’t find another house to frequent. Relocating a bear can also put it in conflict with other resident bears, or disrupt its ability to find natural food sources in a new location. The DNR discontinued the practice of trapping and relocating bears in 1999, and relies instead on the public removing attractants.</p>
<p><strong>Avoid creating a problem</strong></p>
<p>DNR wildlife managers and conservation officers recorded 700 to 900 bear complaints per year by the public in each of the past three years – a slight increase over the past decade. Homeowners most commonly reported damage to birdfeeders and trash cans, and an associated fear of bears being too close to their house.</p>
<p>Homeowners are advised to remove the source of the attractant to solve the problem. For example, the solution might be as easy as taking in birdfeeders in the late afternoon. In most cases, removing the food source removes the problem but it may take the bear a few days to leave the area. This is a simple solution, requiring a slight modification in human behavior in order to change the bear’s behavior, or better yet, to prevent a bear from becoming food conditioned in the first place, and possibly saving its life.</p>
<p>Homeowners can sometimes become frustrated with that simplistic advice and perceive it as a lack of action on the part of wildlife staff. But with relocation not an option, the remaining option is killing the animal – a result wildlife managers and most of the public prefer to avoid.The DNR offers practical tips about avoiding bear conflicts at home and while camping at <a href="http://www.mndnr.gov/livingwith_wildlife/bears">mndnr.gov/livingwith_wildlife/bears</a>.</p>
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		<title>DNR seeks artwork for Minnesota Trout and Salmon Stamp </title>
		<link>http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/06/25/dnr-seeks-artwork-for-minnesota-trout-and-salmon-stamp/</link>
		<pubDate>Mon, 25 Jun 2018 19:23:33 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[juforste]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[DNR News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Fishing]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Page]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/?p=20918</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[Artists can submit entries for the contest that decides what artwork will be featured on the 2019 Minnesota Trout and Salmon Stamp, according to the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. Entries will be accepted from Monday, July 16, to 4 &#8230; <a href="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/06/25/dnr-seeks-artwork-for-minnesota-trout-and-salmon-stamp/">Full Story</a>]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Artists can submit entries for the contest that decides what artwork will be featured on the 2019 Minnesota Trout and Salmon Stamp, according to the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. Entries will be accepted from Monday, July 16, to 4 p.m. Friday, July 27.<span id="more-20918"></span></p>
<img class="size-medium wp-image-20919" src="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/-11-300x217." alt="" width="300" height="217" srcset="http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/-11-300x217. 300w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/-11-75x54. 75w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/-11-768x554. 768w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/-11-600x433. 600w, http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/-11 1000w" sizes="(max-width: 300px) 100vw, 300px" />
<p>Trout or salmon must be the primary focus of the design, though other fish species may be included in the design if they are used to depict common interaction between species or are common inhabitants of Minnesota’s lakes and rivers. Brown trout designs are not eligible this year.</p>
<p>Artists are not allowed to use any photographic product as part of their finished entries. Winning artists can issue limited edition prints of the artwork and retain proceeds. Judging will take place Thursday, Aug. 2, at DNR headquarters, 500 Lafayette Road in St. Paul.</p>
<p>Anglers can purchase the trout and salmon stamp validation with their fishing license for an additional $10. For an extra 75 cents, purchasers can receive the pictorial stamp. It also is available for purchase as a collectible for $10.75. Revenue from stamp sales is dedicated to trout and salmon management and habitat work.</p>
<p>For more information and contest guidelines, visit <a href="http://www.mndnr.gov/stamps">mndnr.gov/stamps</a>, or call the DNR Information Center at 651-296-6157 or 888-646-6367.</p>
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